skinny and stunted

Discussion in 'Goats' started by bluefish, Mar 29, 2006.

  1. bluefish

    bluefish Wait................what?

    Messages:
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    Jan 27, 2006
    Location:
    Montana
    I have two goats that don't get that fat bellied ruminant look. My third one does and he's been growing. My other two used to last summer when they were out on pasture but they've been mostly on hay over the winter. They eat a lot but always look kind of thin and they haven't grown much over the winter. One is two years and one is a year old. The healthy one is also two. I've wormed then and checked and checked for lice. Any ideas?

    Kathryne
     
  2. witchysharon

    witchysharon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Oct 9, 2004
    A big rumen is a healthy rumen....try giving the skinny goats some probiotics. Probiotics help rumen development and function and help maintain a healthy and more stable rumen environment which benefits fiber digesting microorganisms for better forage utilization.

    Probiotics
    http://www.jefferslivestock.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=2&pf_id=0029521

    More Probiotics
    http://www.jeffersequine.com/ssc/products.asp?CID=1&BrowseList=339&dept_id=882

    I buy "All-Pro Biotic" from Jeffer's since it also contains yeast.

    Nutritional Yeast enhances digestion, increases feed intake and weight gain.

    I get #3 - VITA YEAST-20 from Springcreek

    http://www.springcreekgoatsupplies.com/HealthFoodStore.htm
     

  3. cowgirlracer

    cowgirlracer Well-Known Member

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    Mar 13, 2006
    Location:
    Wyoming & building a homestead in Kentucky
    Are you feeding grass hay or some with alfalfa in it. We got a load of grass hay last year, and our goats all slimmed right down. Not what we wanted, winter was coming. We got some alfalfa hay and mixed it to use up the grass hay, they filled back out. Now we only get grass/alfalfa mix hay. :cute:

    cgr
     
  4. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Jun 28, 2003
    Location:
    Southeast Iowa
    Check for eyelid and gum color - if it isn't bright red, your wormer may not be working, either. Did you run a fecal check with a follow up after de-worming? Sounds like something isn't quite working right there if they are thin. How about their minerals? Do they have access to free-choice loose minerals?

    If it's simply a weight issue and all other values are equal, then up the caloric intake and offer grain, slowly...always increase or change diets very slowly with goats and other ruminant animals. But double check that the worms aren't the problem by running a fecal and then evaluate the quality of the hay they have, how much they are eating and what other options they have for ruphage, nutrition and minerals.

    -Sarah
     
  5. bluefish

    bluefish Wait................what?

    Messages:
    2,257
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Location:
    Montana
    Aside from being thin, they seem happy and healthy. They do get a so so quality grass hay but they have free choice minerals and they get a mix of grain and alfalfa pellets everyday. They are wethers so I don't really want them on alfalfa hay. It just seems strange to me to have one doing so well on the diet and two not doing so well. I'll try the fecal test thing. I hadn't thought of double checking. Should have I guess. I'll try the probiotics too. Thanks for all the suggestions!

    Kathryne