skin and bones cattle near road

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by silvergirl, Nov 16, 2006.

  1. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

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    Hi, there,
    There is a mud field near where I live that holds about thirty head of young cattle. These guys are skin and bone... ribs sticking out... and their hay racks are empty... day after day... I know the farmers around here had a tough time putting up hay this summer - there was not enough rain for good growth, and even the co-op is out of good hay... but it is breaking my heart to drive past these young steer every day... If I can find out who owns them, what should I offer for a couple of them... I know it wouldn't make a big difference - the others would still be starving - but I could help at least a few... (Animal control around here wouldn't do anything, so there's no point in suggesting it... animals don't have protection in this county, not horses, cattle, dogs or cats..)

    We have a roughly fenced paddock - and not much growing out there - I know they'd churn it to mud in no time, but I can afford hay at least... and it would be better than what they have - no shelter, no feed, nothing.

    Can anyone suggest what would be a reasonable price for one or two of these young fellows?
    silvergirl
     
  2. montysky

    montysky Well-Known Member

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    Silvergirl, are you talking Beef or Dairly? and what breed x etc. but onto the owner do bad you can't horse whip people. The owner if he can't feed them but wheels on them and take to the sale barn, period.
     

  3. genebo

    genebo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Did you stop to think how much hay you could buy for the price of a couple of those steers? 60 round bales? That much hay could maybe bring all 30 of the steers closer to good health.

    Hay isn't impossible to find in NC this year. I still see it being advertised for sale at reasonable prices. Maybe the farmer has fallen on hard times, and could use some help feeding them. He could be laid up and can't hire anyone to feed them.

    I went to buy hay from a man. While there, I saw the scrawniest, saddest looking horse I'd ever seen, in with some dogs that looked just as bad. They were in an enclosure that looked like it had just been thrown together.

    I jumped on him.

    He told me that he'd just rescued the horse and dogs from a bad situation. He'd only had time to throw together an enclosure to hold them. He had gotten them just ahead of the animal control, which was going to euthanize them, and he didn't have time to do the enclosure properly.

    Things aren't always what they seem. Let's hope that the story of the 30 steers turns out well.

    Genebo
    Paradise Farm
     
  4. Vere My Sone

    Vere My Sone Well-Known Member

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    you don't live in my county
    they'll run over you to get to what "they" think is a neglected animal....
    tresspass, destroy private property, threaten with lawsuits, all before they even investigate---which is why I don't put my jersey by the road
    and was extremely worried when my daughter brought 2 camp horses home who needed to gain a little weight
    they're crazy, I tell ya

    they really harassed a friend of mine because he has longhorn/shorthorn/dairy crosses
    and they were so idiotic about it, demanding he feed them fresh, this years hay--and this was March, and they were knee deep in peanut hay--wanting to know if they had water--as he was standing beside a 7 ACRE pond--then having the gaul to ask if he fed his poultry that was running around loose

    back when we had Floyd, and were being begged for anybody with boats to help rescue people

    my neighbor had his place over-run with 5 boats going across his property, creating wakes onto his house (which the flood had come up to the last brick of his foundation) to resue 3 small dogs from the persons land behind him.....

    GRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!

    I'll repeat myself.....they're crazy, I tell ya
     
  5. cindy04

    cindy04 Well-Known Member

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    Contact the ASPCA! They can point you in the right direction. Local law enforcement officials have to help. You must be aggressive. Let them know that you will take it to the state level if they will not do anything. MAYBE, JUST MAYBE some one is sick, injured or worse and can't get to these steers.
    Strange thing do happen, and some times their just rotten people.

    Good luck and keep us posted
    Cindy
    Don't forget to take pictures, you may need them.
     
  6. Karin L

    Karin L Bovine and Range Nerd

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    You know what I find wierd about that situation? Is that they're by a road for all to see who go by.

    They're in trouble if there's no feed available for the length of time that you said. Obviously if the farmer doesn't have enough feed, why keep the thirty head to starve when he could sell all of them ASAP?? It doesn't matter if they're dairy or beef, if there's no signs of hay available AT ALL for days and days (like no fresh left overs on the ground from previous feeding time (it should be pretty obvious even if it's muddy)) and they're showing no signs of improvement, or no signs of anyone taking care of them, then your alarm bells should REALLY be going off.

    I think this sounds like a case of neglect, IMHO. :flame:
     
  7. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

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    This farmer uses the same fields year after year. This is not a new situation. The cows never look good - they just don't usually look this bad. He rotates two fields near the road, and when he takes the corn off one at the end of one season, he turns out the young cows, and feeds them hay while the field on the side is growing the next crop of corn. They eat stale hay all summer long, no green growth at all. I don't honestly know how he lives with himself, or how he can even stay in business with the condition of his animals... he can't be selling them for much in the state he keeps them in... and, like I said, they never look good... this year is particularly bad, though, and it makes me ill to drive past... no other route, though - it is the main four way... and animal control in this county is notorious. truly. I could tell you stories that would turn your stomach, so I won't... I've been in animal rescue (cats/dogs) for years. The NC ASPCA is powerless - I know the lady who is head of it, have worked with her in the past, and she is a great person but has no authority to make anything happen locally, no matter how bad it gets. I know how much she cares and how hard it is for her to be able to do nothing, particularly in our county.

    They are almost certainly beef cattle, but of no breed I recognize - I know they are not dairy like Holstein or Jersey, or general purpose like Charlais (sp), and they are definitely not Angus, Brahman, or Highland - I'd recognize those breeds... so what might generic, bony, beef cattle bring at the market? I don't know if I can even afford to buy one or two, but if I had an idea at least, maybe I could do something...
    silvergirl
     
  8. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    If one were to haul those calves to a market with plenty of hay likely they would sell quite well. The buyer would know they could put pounds on them fairly cheaply.
     
  9. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    Although I'd probably feel sorry for them I'd mind my own business. I don't like anyone in mine, so I try not to get mixed up with others unless its lending a helping hand if they ask for it.

    We've got enough "Big Brother" crap as is already don't you think?

    GR
     
  10. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

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    You would be surprised to know how often people say that. I knew of a man who had several neglected, starving horses that he'd had since they were young. When authorities were called, he said the same thing, that he had rescued them and was trying to nurse them back to health. Fortunately his daughter had a lot of character and came forward to say that wasn't true. You're right, things aren't always what they seem.
     
  11. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I agree 100%, I was wondering if i was the only one with those sentiments as i read this thread, though lik eyou say i would feel really bad for the starving cows also.
     
  12. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Seems to me like a business oppertunity. If the cattle are healthy, they will gain like crazy on good feed. I'd buy them, put them on good hay for a couple weeks, then ship them to a custom feedlot in KS. Some feedlots will finance you, at least for the feed bill. At current beef prices you would make a mint if you buy them right.
     
  13. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

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    I started a new job today - haven't worked for someone else in years so this is a big stretch for me and I have to admit I am pretty tired... if anyone goes ahead and reads every post I've ever made, I hope they excuse this one because I am pretty disgusted at some of the feedback on here... so, we have enough big brother stuff going on, do we? and you all would rather folks keep their noses out of your business, would you? well, I hope your cattle aren't dragged from your fields with chains around their stiff legs on a regular basis... and please god you have the neighbors you deserve in a community that fits you.

    BTW I originally asked what would be a fair market price for stick thin steers, and no one has responded with a dollar figure or information onwhere I could get a dollar figure. I didn't plan on jumping all over this farmer - as cruel as I believe him to be or as stupid as I think he is for wasting such a god-given blessing as these animals could be. I was planning on offering him a fair price for as many as I could afford to purchase, house and feed. For those of you that have responded with some degree of caring, understanding, and information, I apologize for the brusque tone of this post.
    silvergirl
     
  14. NWMO

    NWMO Well-Known Member

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    Would vary.....and without knowing what type of cattle they are nor an approximate size/age, it would be nearly impossible to make a truly educated guess.....call the gentleman and ask.....and maybe then you can gather some additional information to help us know if the asking price would be fair/reasonable.

    And while posting to a forum, people across the country don't feel the degree of sympathy/anger that you have at the situation.....so the other posters are simply expressing their thoughts, nothing more, nothing less.
     
  15. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    THIRD THAT.

    MIND YOUR OWN DARN BIZ! When you own his land and cows...than you can decide how to manage his assets.
     
  16. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    This thread illustrates the different attitudes people have toward livestock. Generally speaking, people who make a living off livestock or who grew up tending stock see animals as just that, animals. People who come into it late or who have semi-pet livestock tend to anthropomorphize. Such people tend to overfeed, over-vet and over-attach-to their livestock.

    No stockman would willingly starve his animals, but research has shown that when short of feed a stockman may let his animals lose fully a third of their weight without harm to them. When conditions improve the animals put the weight right back on. Without seeing these cattle it would be hard to judge the owner. Even if he is somehow at fault there may be extenuating circumstances. He may need help, not condemnation.

    A few years back a friend got all excited when he saw a range cow beside the road having difficulty calving. Cow stayed there for a full day and he called the humane society and charged the owner with cruelty for not tending the cow. The owner of course did not even know his range cow was calving. Lawsuit followed, friend lost and paid damages for defaming the cattleman. Most of us would have either stopped and pulled the calf ourselves or called the owner and told him where the cow was.
    Ox
     
  17. montysky

    montysky Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Silvergirl for not replying sooner, I just don't get here everyday. Onto the price of the steers. Okay I am in Montana so Not a dead on judging of going rate and not seeing them. But I feel a honest fair price would be 91-95 dollars per CWT. also buy two or more.
     
  18. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    If you can make a guess on weight and breed call your area livestock barn a day before their regular auction and ask to speak to one of the owners. They can likely give you a range off the top of your head. I do agree with Montysky if they went through the ring locally they would likely be in the 91-99 cwt range. One buyer might take them all as he might know of someone in another area with ample hay looking for thin cattle. When fattened they might bring a lower price. However, cheap weight gain would likely offset drop in cwt price.
     
  19. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

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    Ken, montysky, oxankle - thank you. I appreciate your feedback.
    silvergirl
     
  20. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pulled prices for Lexington KY, for today probably .93-.95 for feeders. However, you indicate these were in rough shape, I get the impression that his stock is more than just under weight. I'd start at .85.

    That said put me in the mind my own business camp. His critters, not mine. I will agree he's a fool if he's running them into the ground, don't agree with it but it's his loss.