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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, don't laugh. I've had plum, cherry, and "old" apple trees, but never brand new apple tree's.

I just bought 2 , 5 ft granny smith apple tree's. My simple question is.........How long until they will produce apples? :eek:

Thanks,
mljjranch
 

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Just living Life
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OH.. that is not a silly question at all. I would never laugh at that.

Is your tree Dwarf , Semi- Dwarf, or full sized?
Depending on your Clime, soil, and the tree itself, most will start producing in 3 to 4 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks bergere. :)

The tree's are full size, and we live in Oregon. Not sure about the soil. The only thing that I noticed different was that they appear to be grafted onto a different root system, by the way the tree is growing from the root. (or maybe that is normal, lol)

I kind of had a feeling it wouldn't be for a few years, but I know my mom bought one of those little miniture apple tree's for her patio and the first year she was getting little apples on it, so I wasn't sure about the big tree's.

mljjranch
 

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I think it has to do with the variety, as well as age. I have a Beverly Hills tht I have yet to get any fruit from and I've had it for a couple years, was in a 20Gal pot when I bought it. I bought an Anna variety the year after and that same year I got fruit - same size. Now the Anna tree is bigger than the BH, and it already blossomed and have fruits starting. The BH is just starting to get the buds for either leaves or fruit. Funny thing, though, the BH is hybridized for warmer CA weather and the other is not.
 

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My apple trees, which were very small (less than knee-high) when I got them, started producing after 6 and 7 years. Those are the standards.

The dwarfs, which I planted later, began producing after only 2 years.

I have had a semi-dwarf for 4 years. It hasn't produced yet, but I'm hoping this will be the year.
 

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We have lived here 12 years now and probably 10 years ago I started with several beautiful, Stark semi-dwarfs. The deer frequent that area as it is a ways from the house and dog. I have yet to have one produce, well then again, most of them have been eaten or rubbed. So, 4 years ago I planted one granny smith and it was huge last year with some blossoms, no fruit though. I do expect fruit this fall. Along with the semi-dwarf I had planted one standard peach tree because I couldn't get a s-d and they don't get as big as the apples anyhow. It has produced for 4-5 years now, but if the crows get there first they win. Last year this tree had hundreds of med-size peaches one day (day before I planned to pick them at their just ripenest) and the next day there were only a few left and they had been pecked at. That's what you get for having a side job. The deer have met their match with the standards though. They just grow faster than they can completely destroy them. The s-ds also took a hit with the locust a few years back. Has anyone else had bad experience with the s-ds?
 

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The only thing that I noticed different was that they appear to be grafted onto a different root system, by the way the tree is growing from the root. (or maybe that is normal, lol)
mljjranch,

You have a grafted fruit tree. That is the normal method of fruit tree propagation. Just make sure that when you plant the tree that the graft or bud union (the lump about 4-6 inches above the root stock) will be about 2-3 inches above the soil surface (after soil settling). If the graft gets into the soil, the varietal section above the graft will initiate roots and you won't get the same kind of tree your expecting.

Also, for the first 4 years, make sure you wrap the trunk of the fruit tree up to about 24" with some sort of non-binding rabbit guard. Even higher if you get a lot of snow. During a hard winter the little buggers will "girdle" your trees and kill'em dead!
 

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I'm so glad this thread got started. I just got my bare-root whips in (Macintosh semi-dwarf) in zone 6, and they go in on Tuesday.

I was thinking of using pipe insulation (the kind that looks like the foam 'noodles' kids use in pools these days) because it has a slit up one side and I bet it's a pretty good insulator with out weird weather here just north of Pittsburgh.

Can anyone think of why that may not be a good idea? I plan to wrap tape around them too, b/c I expect the slit up the side of the foam to invite all kinds of problems.

Jeanne
 

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oakhillhubbards said:
I'm so glad this thread got started. I just got my bare-root whips in (Macintosh semi-dwarf) in zone 6, and they go in on Tuesday.

I was thinking of using pipe insulation (the kind that looks like the foam 'noodles' kids use in pools these days) because it has a slit up one side and I bet it's a pretty good insulator with out weird weather here just north of Pittsburgh.

Can anyone think of why that may not be a good idea? I plan to wrap tape around them too, b/c I expect the slit up the side of the foam to invite all kinds of problems.

Jeanne
I'm not sure what effect (good or bad) the foam insulation around the trunk will have on the health of the tree. I do know that foam won't offer a barrier to a rabbit's teeth. It may also harbor insects and allow a snug place for them to overwinter. It may impart an unbalanced temperature differential to the trunk as compared to the rest of the tree. It is possible that the tree may then not go into dormancy when it should or it may come out of dormancy too early in the spring. You might try one tree and experiment with it. I'm sure I would not risk my entire new orchard.

I do know for sure that wrapping tape around the foam insulation is a bad idea. Healthy fruit trees grow very fast and will quickly strangle themselves with the tape. A couple times a season, I even have to loosen the spiral plastic tree protectors that Stark Bros. Nursery sells. They're suppose to unwind as the trunk expands in girth, but sometimes they will stick.
 
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