silage for goats?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by marvella, Nov 25, 2004.

  1. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    a coworker asked me to post this. he wanted to know if you could save grass clippings all summer, say in plastic trash bags or something, until it turns into silage, and therefore has a higher nutrient content. i had no idea, had never noticed it being addressed on here. makes sense to me. does anyone know? thanks in advance.:)
     
  2. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    I've read that silage is great, and goats will eat it.. as long as it hasn't molded :eek:
     

  3. LuckyGRanch

    LuckyGRanch Well-Known Member

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    Silage and goats is a very scary combination unless you are very well versed in silage and how it's made, know when it's going bad, etc. Goats are very susceptible to Listerosis and I think it's silage that has a higher incidence of it.

    As far as grass clippings in bags...... :no: :no: :no: !!! And this is coming from someone who has upwards of 100 goats and I'm always looking for cheaper ways to feed my goats and will try just about anything. :eek:
     
  4. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    OK, i got a no, and an i don't see why not.:) anybody else?

    thanks so far!!!! coworker is pretty knowledgable about farm life. worked as farm hand on organic farm in CT for several years.
     
  5. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

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    The problem here is that goats are as susceptible to moldy feed as horses, unlike cattle which are fairly tolerant. And silage tends to go moldy rather quickly once it hits the air, so it would take a skillful manager to handle the feeding to goats, so that unspoiled silage was always being fed.

    Plus, plastic (even the heavy weight stuff they use in haylage bags) tends to form pinhole leaks in it, allowing air into the silage/haylage, which causes spoilage. Plastic bags would be even less sturdy, and more problematic.
     
  6. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    gotcha.:) see it's me that knows nothing about silage.

    i'll pass it along.

    thanks!!
     
  7. M&G-Nubians

    M&G-Nubians Member

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    I'm trying it and would recommend trying it to anyone. I use contractor bags and suck as much air out as I can using a shop vac. Seal the bags and stack. Wait about 25 days before using. If they start loosing the vaccum - you have a problem and will get mold. Only put as much clippings as can be consumed within about three days. Once oxygen is reentroduced to the clippings mold will begin. DO NOT use any of the molding portion. Try to keep sticks that can puncture the bags out. Walk your yard before mowing. Good luck