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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am fairly new to sheep as well as this forum but I've sure learned lots since joining both worlds!

I have a small flock of six suffolk and suffolk cross ewes as well as a suffolk ram and two lambs.

One of the first ewes that was given to me this summer , Granny, is an older girl. She has all her teeth still but it is guessed that she is about 7-8 years old. When I got her she was very thin and had a snuffly nose. I dewormed her with ivermectin and she came around very well. She has a huge appetite, loves any and all treats especially pumpkin! She is the loudest of the bunch, demanding food every time she sees me.

Two days ago I noticed a swelling on the under-right of her neck, and it has become much larger now. I got a hold of her and felt it and it is hard, about the size of a softball. She hasn't otherwise appeared sick until today - she has a snotty nose. She is still very active and is even more demanding about getting her treats.

I have read about bottle jaw, which seems to be a soft swelling correct? This is definitely a hard swelling. She was last dewormed with ivermectin in August, and she probably had never been dewormed before that.

I have some panacur, should I try that?

There has been some changes for the flock over the past two weeks - I moved them to a different pen and started flushing them with oats/barley/corn. They have also been eating pumpkin every day.

Any ideas what is going on with Granny? What should I do?
 

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Check her temperature (102.5f +- is normal) check her over for other lumps. Could be an abcess so feel for softer spots on the lumps and you can try to lance it. Careful where you try this you want to catch and dispose of any puss. If it's hard puss or cheesey texture (white) it could be CL. Doesn't really sound like worms though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Ross... I read up on CL as well as looked up pictures. It looks like that could be a possibility considering the location, hardness, size, and how quickly it appeared :(

At the moment I don't have a separate pen to put her in, but will try to devise one tomorrow to keep her separate. I am thinking since she is aged, not very thrifty, and has this lump that perhaps she should be culled?

I have not noticed any lumps or bumps on the others, but will take a good look tomorrow.

My ram was scheduled to be put in with the girls this week... would it be best to wait now?
 

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Get her to a vet and have it tested for CL. If it is CL, get rid of her. You don't want to deal with that if you don't have to. It can get in the soil, on equipment and fence posts from them rubbing, and can even be spread to another farm by your shearer.
If it is bottle jaw, it will go away with deworming. Your vet can do a fecal exam and see what she needs.
 

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I would advise you to isolate this ewe until you can get a vet result on the swelling. If it is CL, and the abcess ruptures, the bacteria is said to live in the soil for up to 50 years! You don't need it.
Whether or not you value this "granny" ewe enough to have the veterinary expense, if there is a possibility that it could be CL, you need to know for the sake of the rest of the flock - they could also be carrying it. If she tests positive, (and I'm hoping she doesn't) then you will want to test the rest of the flock. If she is negative, you can rest easier knowing!
We had this happen right after shearing to one of our "grannies" - a nine-year-old gummer that we had just brought in as part of a flock purchase. It looked like a puncture wound - but it was in the right spot for CL. (Make sure your shearers disinfect their equipment between flocks! Ours does, but we had neglected to ask at the time - and I was afraid I had made a grieveous mistake!)
We isolated her, had it tested (it takes ten agonizing days for a culture) and thankfully, it was negative. She is all better, presented us with a sweet ewe lamb only a couple of weeks later, and there have been no other abcesses in the flock.
I hope you have the same happy outcome!
 
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