sick calf

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Unregistered-1427815803, May 23, 2004.

  1. I have a sick calf! He is a jersey bull calf, born april 30. He was on mom for a bit so he got colostrum. Our 4-h dairy leader brought him to us, first he got scours and i was told to put him on the powdered tetracycline, one teaspoon in his bottle for about 5-7 days. i have been doing that, now all of a sudden he has this dry cough, kind of heaving. He is on goats milk, but there wasn't any weight gain so i started adding one cup of replacer to his goats milk, he is doing better as i see some covering over his ribs. As for the dry cough, the dairy leader says it' s prob bec of the goat milk (?) or bec i had him on wood shavings. He says he does not recommend that bedding for calves....then why on earth didn't he tell me that when he put the calf in the barn with me???! I guess my question is, should i give him a dose of LA 200, even tho he's on the powder antiobiotic? He is laying down and just doesn't look good, he looked fine this morning. I have two other calves who are thriving on goats milk, as a matter of fact i have always raised them on goats milk with good results. I"m having trouble believing that that is what his problem is...
     
  2. SHELBY

    SHELBY Well-Known Member

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    Does he have a temp???? Is he still scouring???? How much does he weigh???? How much are you feeding and how often????

    After my calves lose their cords they are bedded in sawdust...I bed in straw until that time...Sawdust if it is not kiln dired holds to much bacteria that is probably why he said that....

    As for the cough...Did he maybe catch a draft??? Did he possibly suck down the milk the wrong way??? If he had something like shipping fever that was causing the scours then he may have got a secondary infection causing the cough....Of the tetracycline is not enough to take care of the infection in the first place...You can give him the LA-200 and see how he does...For scours though usually the best way to control them is to make sure you are not overfeeding and give sulfa Sustain 3 is a great one to use....

    You have to take alot into consideration when diagnosing and treating these little buggers....
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Some calves will try eating thier bedding, the cough is probably just that. No fever, or is his temp low? If its high or over 102.5 by a degree or more the tetracycline might not be what he needs. He might need an anti-inflamitory or steriod and perhaps a different antibiotic. Just too hard to say from here!! Normally an oral antibiotic would work on a respritory infection too, and LA200 is really the same thing as what he's had. If his temperature is low I'd wonder if he isn't constipated from the "enriched" milk.
     
  4. i have not taken a temp, no scouring...he was when he first got here, that's why the antiobiotic in his bottle. I know he tried to eat his bedding bec i dug it out of his mouth....tonight when i went to the barn to milk, he jumped right up and eagerly drank all his milk. Geez, two hours before he looked terrible. He's a jersey calf, small, i don't know maybe he weighs 80 lb? I am feeding him one a half bottles twice a day. i was feeding him one, then the dairy leader said he needed more to up him half a bottle. he wasn't gaining any weight at all, just looked like a bag of bones. If he still looks down in the morn i'll take his temp.
    Has anyone ever had/heard of a calf disagreeing with goats milk?
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Disagreeing with the change yes, goats milk in patrticular no. Adding the powder to the milk could cause constipation and he'd look sickish until it passes. Just a guess though.
     
  6. Thank you for your suggestions, the little guy is his regular bouncy self so i guess he was constipated.
    Now i have another question....Our 4-h leader told me to keep him penned up in the barn for at least a month. I have a beautiful pasture with lots of sunshine and shade, i wanted to put him out there of a day for exercise and whatnot. I feel terrible keeping him locked in a stall all day, just seems like it can't be good for him to not exercise or get sunshine. He says that if he starts eating grass he will not eat his other food, do you agree with this?
     
  7. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Please do not reley on this man for advise any more he keeps selling you bum steers (sorry, couldn,t resist). Jersey calves are notoriously hard to start. I would get a QUALITY replacer, not the cheap stuff, and follow the feeding instructions to the T. If he scours try a gut active antibiotic, like neomiacin. (sp?)
     
  8. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Definitely get the little guy outside and give him fresh air and let him nibble on grass. Don't let him get too much grass at first or that could cause problems, too...but gradually give him more and more time to eat the grass...how else is he supposed to develop his rumen, and learn how to graze like a normal cow? I agree - don't take any advice form this guy...sounds like he has no clue...

    Sarah
     
  9. Oh i won't be taking any advice from him, he is the nicest man but like i said, he won't tell you the same thing twice. I have raised calves in the past on goats milk, and put them immediately on pasture. This calf is for 4-h so i thot well maybe care of those were different. But more and more it just sounded ridiculous. He also told me to keep him on calf starter for a year!
    Why are jersey's hard to start? Another thing he told me is to not to begin weaning him from milk until he was eating 5 lb of grain a day, is that correct? thank you guys so much
     
  10. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I should have said they are hard to start off the cow, I raised one on the cow, along with a holstien calf, and in 8 months he outweighed mama. I think it is because bottle calves are more suseptible to disease combined with the fact that jersey calves are so small, the don't have a big reserve of body mass if they start to lose condition
     

  11. Hi I got my dad a baby jersey bull for father's day. I went crazy looking for baby calves until I found a dairy farm near where we live about 1hr away. I thought it was going to be something nice but my mom and sister said it was the most upsetting thing they've ever experienced! the baby bull was only a day old! but I guess they felt forced to bring him home so that we can at least give him a chance at life!! we were told to give him colostrum for the first week and we did.

    But he has had diahrea is this normal since he can't have anything solid yet? We've started to feed him Uni Milk. We've also given him Pedialite to keep him hydrated. You think Goat milk would help?

    He seems to be doing good he walks around smelling leaves and flowers. poor thing I really hope he makes it What advice can you give us?

    we are first timers!!
     
  12. angus_guy

    angus_guy Well-Known Member

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    I raise holstein bottle calves and the 5 lbs of grain a day is correct for holsteins it usually happens around 45 days
    I keep my calves in small lot 10,000 sq ft until weined but they always have access to good hay.
    I raise in the winter because summer is hard on calves in general but esp bottle calves ( warm humid days are a perfect breeding ground for bacteria)
    I only feed (qty-1) 2 qt bottle per calf per feeding any more and increase the number of feedings. Also, the nipples should not "pour" the milk down his throat calf salivation aids in the digestion so change the nipples when they begin to tear.
    Also keep the water in front of the calfs
     
  13. angus_guy

    angus_guy Well-Known Member

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    Woops was not finished .........

    for scours isolate......LA-200 ...... stop the replacer.....swithch to electrolytes 3x a day for 48 hours .......... give probycin and replacer at next feeding


    key to scours is to keep the elctrolytes in him and isolate