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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am working with a 27 day old Nigerian Dwarf kid. He is one of four, all healthy at birth.

The short version is this: He has been sick for ten days. 4 different antibiotics have been tried at this point, none have managed symptoms for longer than a day (two days TOPS).

Symptoms include:
  • high temp (104.7 at highest),
  • very droopy ears
  • lethargy,
  • sleeping/standing away from the herd consistently,
  • intermittent nursing,
  • teeth grinding,
  • stands EXTREMELY still for extended periods of time (think a tiny baby goat statue),
  • no playing or frolicking with siblings.
  • He has not been poopy.
The long version:
At 18 days old, I began to notice a general droopiness about him. He seemed lethargic, his ears were drooping, I rarely saw him nurse, and he would just stand in place, extremely still for long periods of time (to the point where I repeatedly wondered if he had fallen asleep standing up), while all of his siblings ran and played around him. He did not have a temperature at this time. By 8 pm that evening, he had a temp of 104.2. Started him on Excenel for 5 days.

After a couple of days with no temp but continued droopiness and lethargy, his temp started spiking again (103.6-104.4), switched to Nuflor, couple more days of droopiness, spiked again, tried Drax/Dex (intended to be given twice, several days apart). The last med seemed to have better results, with some playfulness returning, and lower temps, but a few days before his next dose, all symptoms returned full force and the temp spiked AGAIN. We gave the second dose a couple of days early, which dropped the temp, but the very next day (today, 10 days after originally seeing symptoms) he spiked a 104.1. He was given a cocktail of Pen-G, B Complex, and Banamine at 10 am. This dropped him to a 103.2 for a few hours, but by 3:30 pm, he was temped at a 104.7.

He has been receiving a bottle of his mother's milk, because he seems to not be consistently nursing. and several of the times I have seen him try, his mom has moved away from him (can't explain, she doesn't kick off or move from the others consistently).

I am new to goats and anything farm-related, but I fall in love fast, and this little buckling has my heart. But also, to alleviate concern, the people I work with, and those who are administering meds and making those calls are VERY experienced but are officially at a loss as to how to proceed. Any help is appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wondered about that, but there has been no diarrhea or abnormal poop (that's honestly the one symptom he HASN'T had, haha), and we put a sample under the microscope and saw nothing abnormal.
 

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I am working with a 27 day old Nigerian Dwarf kid. He is one of four, all healthy at birth.

The short version is this: He has been sick for ten days. 4 different antibiotics have been tried at this point, none have managed symptoms for longer than a day (two days TOPS).

Symptoms include:
  • high temp (104.7 at highest),
  • very droopy ears
  • lethargy,
  • sleeping/standing away from the herd consistently,
  • intermittent nursing,
  • teeth grinding,
  • stands EXTREMELY still for extended periods of time (think a tiny baby goat statue),
  • no playing or frolicking with siblings.
  • He has not been poopy.
The long version:
At 18 days old, I began to notice a general droopiness about him. He seemed lethargic, his ears were drooping, I rarely saw him nurse, and he would just stand in place, extremely still for long periods of time (to the point where I repeatedly wondered if he had fallen asleep standing up), while all of his siblings ran and played around him. He did not have a temperature at this time. By 8 pm that evening, he had a temp of 104.2. Started him on Excenel for 5 days.

After a couple of days with no temp but continued droopiness and lethargy, his temp started spiking again (103.6-104.4), switched to Nuflor, couple more days of droopiness, spiked again, tried Drax/Dex (intended to be given twice, several days apart). The last med seemed to have better results, with some playfulness returning, and lower temps, but a few days before his next dose, all symptoms returned full force and the temp spiked AGAIN. We gave the second dose a couple of days early, which dropped the temp, but the very next day (today, 10 days after originally seeing symptoms) he spiked a 104.1. He was given a cocktail of Pen-G, B Complex, and Banamine at 10 am. This dropped him to a 103.2 for a few hours, but by 3:30 pm, he was temped at a 104.7.

He has been receiving a bottle of his mother's milk, because he seems to not be consistently nursing. and several of the times I have seen him try, his mom has moved away from him (can't explain, she doesn't kick off or move from the others consistently).

I am new to goats and anything farm-related, but I fall in love fast, and this little buckling has my heart. But also, to alleviate concern, the people I work with, and those who are administering meds and making those calls are VERY experienced but are officially at a loss as to how to proceed. Any help is appreciated.
Goat polio/listeriosis maybe. Why switching antibiotics frequently?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Goat polio/listeriosis maybe. Why switching antibiotics frequently?
We would remain consistent on meds and see improvement and then suddenly he would relapse as if he had never taken any at all, so we would switch to try and get one to stick. I was posting without the med log in front of me, so some of the dates may not be accurate, but I tried to get the gist of it. When he would have a downtick (which has been quite frequent) it legitimately appeared as if he was on borrowed time, so different meds would be introduced. Honestly, he may still be on borrowed time and I am just not willing to accept it. I have not worked with goats very long, so I haven't experienced losing one yet. This happens to be a kid that I bonded with soon after his birth, so while any death would be difficult, this would be a particularly miserable "first farm loss" to deal with haha.
 

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Hola,

First I'd give him injectable and oral parasite medication. Ivermectin and albendazol or whatever. But there are lung parasites that don't make critters cough and intestinal parasites that don't make them poop all over the place. Plus all the other ones I don't know about.

Second, i know this isn't your current mindset, but little male goats are generally meat. You don't want them mating with their sisters and cousins (we ain't that far out in the country ha ha) and drinking all the milk. We usually ate them at around a month, just a little time to fill out. Very yummy.

I'd stop the antibiotics cuz they're not working (viral?), try a round of parasite meds and use injectable analgesic like ketoprofen to control the fever. That has a very short meat restriction period so if the dude survives the antibiotic and parasite med restriction time you can decide if you want to eat him. Like the tenderest beef ever.

Farm animals are very fun and rewarding but the hits are harder too. You'll get used to it. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hola,

First I'd give him injectable and oral parasite medication. Ivermectin and albendazol or whatever. But there are lung parasites that don't make critters cough and intestinal parasites that don't make them poop all over the place. Plus all the other ones I don't know about.

Second, i know this isn't your current mindset, but little male goats are generally meat. You don't want them mating with their sisters and cousins (we ain't that far out in the country ha ha) and drinking all the milk. We usually ate them at around a month, just a little time to fill out. Very yummy.

I'd stop the antibiotics cuz they're not working (viral?), try a round of parasite meds and use injectable analgesic like ketoprofen to control the fever. That has a very short meat restriction period so if the dude survives the antibiotic and parasite med restriction time you can decide if you want to eat him. Like the tenderest beef ever.

Farm animals are very fun and rewarding but the hits are harder too. You'll get used to it. Good luck
Oh, he definitely won't be eaten. The farm I work for has some very high ranking milkers and established bloodlines, so bucklings are either sold for breeding purposes or wethered and live out a rather pampered life on the property. It's definitely not a traditional farm setting in that sense haha.
 

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Hola,

First I'd give him injectable and oral parasite medication. Ivermectin and albendazol or whatever. But there are lung parasites that don't make critters cough and intestinal parasites that don't make them poop all over the place. Plus all the other ones I don't know about.

Second, i know this isn't your current mindset, but little male goats are generally meat. You don't want them mating with their sisters and cousins (we ain't that far out in the country ha ha) and drinking all the milk. We usually ate them at around a month, just a little time to fill out. Very yummy.

I'd stop the antibiotics cuz they're not working (viral?), try a round of parasite meds and use injectable analgesic like ketoprofen to control the fever. That has a very short meat restriction period so if the dude survives the antibiotic and parasite med restriction time you can decide if you want to eat him. Like the tenderest beef ever.

Farm animals are very fun and rewarding but the hits are harder too. You'll get used to it. Good luck
I agree to a point on stopping antibiotic treatment. However, an immediate response to antibiotics should not be expected, and I really dont think it is healthy nor very safe to just throw every antibiotic at the poor kid and hope something works. With that said, continued doses of a broad soectrum antibiotic may be helpful.... so long as the OP sticks to the treatment and administers a full course.

And I would also give the little guy some BoSe (because why not, nothing else is working) and large doses of b vitamins.
 

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I lost a favorite doe to pneumonia. She would rally and fade with each round of antibiotics. We put her out of her misery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I lost a favorite doe to pneumonia. She would rally and fade with each round of antibiotics. We put her out of her misery.
Oh I am so sorry 😭. That has been one of my fears is that we are just prolonging his suffering. But my (incredibly patient) coworkers, as well as the wonderful woman who owns the farm have been sending me updates last night and today while I can't be there, and it seems he is easily taking the bottle and has held steady at 103.1 since about 6:30 last night. So I am genuinely praying we have turned a corner. I just wish I knew what was causing it// if it could have been prevented.
 
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