Siberian Pea Shrub

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by minnikin1, Jul 27, 2006.

  1. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Is anyone growing this?

    It has so many uses, I thought this would be a great homestead plant!
    Along with being used as a poultry food crop, it has lots of benefits. Heres a clip I found-

    Edible Uses:
    The seeds of siberian pea-shrub are edible cooked. Small but produced in abundance, there are 4 - 6 seeds per pod. Having a bland flavor, it is best used in spicy dishes. The raw seed has a mild pea-like flavor. The seed contains 12.4% of a fatty oil and up to 36% protein, and it has been recommended as an emergency food for humans. More than just an emergency food, this species has the potential to become a staple crop in areas with continental climates. The young pods can be eaten cooked and used as a vegetable.

    Medicinal Uses:
    The whole plant, known as ning tiao, is used in the treatment of cancer of the breast, and the orifice to the womb, and for dysmenorrhea and other gynecological problems.

    Other Uses:
    A fibre obtained from the bark is used for making cordage. A blue dye is obtained from the leaves. The plant can be grown as a hedge. It is quite wind-resistant and can also be planted in a shelterbelt. The plant has an extensive root system and can be used for erosion control, especially on marginal land. Because of its nitrogen-fixing capacity, it is valued as a soil-improving plant.
     
  2. kasilofhome

    kasilofhome Well-Known Member

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    so how do I find it? You got my attention
     

  3. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/

    I just ordered some seeds for it from this place.

    I'm not sure how it will do in our area; I've been reading some conflicting info.
    They say it prefers dry and sandy soils , but I also saw it does ok in heavy clay,
    And clay doesn't get too much heavier than ours..

    I originally saw it recommended on the Ohio State Forest Garden site - I had never heard of it before that.