Should I worry about fencing with bulls

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by DOlthaus, May 29, 2006.

  1. DOlthaus

    DOlthaus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Location:
    Ohio
    I have two Simental bulls on about 5 acres. Part is regular field fence topped with barbed wire the rest is field fence with one strand electric. The "boys" are about a year and a half old and have started to spend time in the lower pasture looking and bawling towards the next farm down the road. They have cows.

    I know that bulls have a reputation for pushing fence down. Do I have to worry even with electric fence?

    Thanks for your help
     
  2. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

    Messages:
    8,818
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Location:
    S.E.Alabama
    never had a bull, but i had a 350lb boer billy that could bust through cattle pannels if he wanted to get to the girls, and there was hot wire on the inside of the cattle pannels, i would emagin that a 1000lb or more bull could get out alot easyer if he really wanted to, i would be sure to have the best fence i could have to keep them in, i doubt that the neahbors would take too kindly to two strange bulls comeing over to visit their cows, unless they just want some free accedental breedings,
    if they have bulls though it could be a fight and thats not good
     

  3. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

    Messages:
    3,841
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Location:
    KS
    This sounds like a trainwreck about to happen, LOL. Would strongly urge you to not allow those bulls into area with one strand of electric fence. When ready to mount, a young bull raging with hormones will gladly endure pain of electric shock for a few moments to reach neighbor's cows.
    A good measure would be to reaarange your fencing layout so there is an area of real estate(no man's land) between the bull's territory and any neighboring cow's or heifers. If this is not feasible, think in terms of building a good fence or eliminating bulls from the environment.
    If you take no action, things will get ugly,LOL.
     
  4. john in la

    john in la Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    219
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Location:
    louisiana
    3 ways to stop a bull from getting to the neighbors cows.
    cut him
    move him
    or restrain him in a 8' high pipe bull yard.
     
  5. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

    Messages:
    3,841
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Location:
    KS
    ***Hey John, Don't Sugar Coat It, Come out and say what you really think,LOL, .....LOL. ..........(enjoyed that one)................
     
  6. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,441
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    If you don't want trouble with your neighbors put in a tight, heavy fence. Nothing makes a farmer madder than having an unvited bull visit his cows. Also bulls can turn dangerous any time. You don't want a lawsuit over one of your bulls harming someone.
     
  7. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,649
    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    Hill Country, Texas
    AI is soooo Much easier than owning bulls. Much better semen available too. My Beefmaster cow was just bred to the first Million Dollar Angus Bull. Cost me $30.00. All Bull Calves are cut around here and eaten 18 months later.
     
  8. milkinpigs

    milkinpigs Dairy/Hog Farmer

    Messages:
    508
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2005
    Location:
    Catlett Creek Hog Farm Unit 1
    Use 2 strands of barb wire as your hot wires, not smooth wire or tape and make sure it's HOT!!! We've held brangus bulls that would eat your lunch that way. Be sure to flag all youe hot wires and they learn quick.
     
  9. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    660
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Location:
    Effingham, Illinois 5b
    I had the gentlest nicest Registered Texas Longhorn bull. You could pull a stock trailer out in the pasture and he'd come over and jump right in....he knew he was going to see more girls. I built 5 foot fenced lot for him to keep him away from the girls. He just backed up and jumped the fence. :cowboy: I've seen a Charolais bull go over an 8 foot heavy duty fence. :D
     
  10. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    It's quite common for beef calf producers to start breeding their cows around June 1st. Unless you have better things to do with your bulls, this would be the time to SELL.
     
  11. DOlthaus

    DOlthaus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Location:
    Ohio
    Just a follow-up about my bull raising experience. I took all your advice to heart and after nightly prayer that the boys stay inside the fence AND a lot of worry. I got both to the butcher.

    They turned out great! Lean but good taste and tender. What I learned is that it sure isn't worth the worry to keep bulls around! We will either cut them or buy them cut the next time.

    Thanks for all your advice.
     
  12. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

    Messages:
    10,854
    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Zone 7
    You could do as I do. I have so many cows that the bull has lost interest in anything that is not under his nose. The neighbors heifer had to come visit him.
     
  13. francismilker

    francismilker Udderly Happy! Supporter

    Messages:
    2,853
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I agree with UpNorth. I add though, a young bull is like a sixteen year old boy, he can smell a heifer for miles and a long walk down a dark road to get to a cow is not going to bother him for a minute! He's got other things than the distance on his mind.