Should I take this cow?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JanO, May 30, 2005.

  1. JanO

    JanO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have an opportunity to get a 7 year old Holstien/Hereford cross cow for only about $400-$500. She's a former FFA project, gentle, and a super milk producer. She would make a great cow for my kids to learn about livestock on. (niether one of them have spent much time around cattle, and they think I'm nuts because I want to go back to what I grew up with.)

    I'm thinking that she would make a good nurse cow to raise some calves on..she could probably raise 3 at a time (maybe 4) and I could get at least a dozen or more raised off her and sold in a year. Anyway, my delima is that she is currently dry, and has just recently been rebred so she wouldn't freshen again until next spring at the earliest. Which means I would have to feed her for a year before I saw anything come back to me. On the other hand, I only have the space for one or 2 good cows and a few calves at a time. She definatly is the type of cow that I want as far as temperment and production. She seems to be an easy keeper too, but because of her size I know that she's going to take a lot of feed in the winter. She's got the size of a holstien, but the build of a hereford. I just don't know if this is going to be a good investment or not, which surprises me because I usually don't have to wonder when it comes to my animals and money. :bash:
     
  2. evermoor

    evermoor Well-Known Member

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    A good house cow is hard to find, esp at that price. Being crossed with the hereford should make her pretty hardy an a easy keeper. Make sure she is confirmed pregnant unless you have access to a bull or AI. After reading some of the other post about how hard it was to find their cow this on sounds pretty good if you can hold her over till next year.
     

  3. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    Whether you have pasture for summer, or have to feed hay year-round, and whether you put up your own hay or have to buy it, would be the deciding factors, I would think.

    The cow herself sounds like a great deal! :)
     
  4. JanO

    JanO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You both brought up good points... I'd be ok as far as pasture goes until Nov. or early Dec.. Maybe even longer depending on the elements. I don't think I'd have to buy and feed strictly hay for very long so that is a factor. I think as long as I know she is bred and I can get a calf out of her within the year she would work out. I dont' think I could carry her much longer then that though. I'm not going to only have her to feed, but a second cow as well that is in milk... but since I don't plan on putting any calves on either of them until next spring it shouldnt' be too difficult make one contribute to the feed bill of the other. Assuming I get enough shares out of the milking cow to cover some of the cost.

    Oh, what the heck, I think I'll get her. Worse case it won't work out and I'll have to sell her. :p
     
  5. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    I would want to know why she is presently dry. Didn't she have a calf this spring? If not, why?
     
  6. JanO

    JanO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    OD the way it was explained to me she calved last year. When she was sold to the people that have her now she was in milk but had not been bred back. But, due to their own ingorance they let her dry up by not milking her regularly. (They only milked her when they needed the milk, not daily as it should have been done. She probably didn't get milked out either.) She didn't get mastitis, but she did dry up pretty quick according to them. When they figured out what was going on they tried to put a calf on her to nurse but by then she was pretty much done with it all. That was just a couple months ago from what I gather. :rolleyes: I told them that I wanted assurence that she was at least bred back before I would buy her. If they are being truthful I should have a calf from her in early Feb. I do want a vet check first just to be sure.
     
  7. ihedrick

    ihedrick Can't stop thinkin'

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    If they didn't know much about milking her daily and then tried to stick a calf on her...what do they know about breeding her? I would want some type of proof based on your previously posted concerns. Would you take a chance that she isn't bred? I don't know much about cows, but that's my two cents worth.