Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just moved to a new home that is on 1/3 acre (home is smack dab in the middle of it, so half the property is the front yard... not sure how effectively I can garden there).

It has a good-sized back yard. But... there are a total of 22 oak trees on the property. 3 of them are dead and part of another is dying, I just called a tree removal service who is supposed to come out tomorrow and remove those 3.5 trees and grind the stumps, for $500.

Being that it's winter, I can't quite tell where there will be any sunny spots in the yard when the trees are in leaf. I'm wondering if I should have other trees taken down so I can have more sunny spots? (There is one tree that's alive but totally covered with ivy for a good 25-30' up the trunk, maybe I could have that one taken out?)

I'm planning on doing square foot gardening so I won't need huge amounts of area to garden...

The guy right behind me has a lovely, sunny yard with only 1 tree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
Is the front yard sunny? Or full of trees also? With any of the raised bed techniques and such, You can certainly garden in the front yard. As long as kept tidy, most neighbors are very happy to see constructive gardening.
What direction is the front of the house? If towards the south, you may be able to get in some gardening in your back yard without having to remove anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The house faces the west... the back yard is on the east side of the house.

There are 9 oak trees in the front yard. About half of them are grouped together in different spots, and one is right in the middle of the yard.

I could probably do some square-foot style gardening in some small planters around the front yard. Especially if I mixed it in with some ornamentals!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,573 Posts
Oh, I wouldn't cut big oaks if they are healthy. They add value to your property. Wait until Spring and locate the sunny spots in your yard and then plan where your beds will be. There are lots of vegetables that are ornamental on their own and are quite pretty for front yard beds.
 

·
Just howling at the moon
Joined
·
6,586 Posts
You don't want to take down so many that you don't have shade on the house in the summer. That could really increase your air conditioning bill.

I garden in my front yard, back yard and both side yards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
Are there trees on the south side of the house? If not, I would think you might be able to do pretty well with a garden in the front or back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You keeping the wood for firewood?
Definitely. They'll cut it into 18-20" lengths and it's up to DH or I to split it further.

I'll leave the living trees for now. I'm sure I'll find something to grow, even if it's just in one 4'x4' planter.

Here is what my backyard looks like now (kinda cloudy and gloomy outside at the moment). The trees are kind of tall, there are very few branches closer than 15' or so to the ground. THe two near the center of the front pic (and the one that you can barely see the edge of) are the onesthat will be cut down. Yes, I know I REALLY ought to rake those leaves up and compost them! That'll be a task for next week, when it warms up a bit.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
okay, I searched around and found a couple sites that said leafy vegetables (lettuce, cabbage, mustard greens, etc) are shade-tolerant, and that if they have a couple hours of sun in the morning, then being shaded the rest of the day can help them survive the intense sumer heat/sun. I think every part of the yard will be getting varying amounts of sun throughout the day, it's not like the shade of a building or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
Wow, that is a lot of trees. YOu might have to wait until summer is here to know where you will have enough sun in that back yard. Most of those leafy vegetables you mention above will grow gangbusters during the winter in Texas. You may have to cover if we get a heavy freeze, but they will grow right through a frost. Add carrots and onions and you could do pretty well with a winter garden.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top