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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody know where I can find plans for a work shop that would have a mono pitch roof? My ideal shop would be about 48' wide x 32' deep, out of 2x6 construction. Probably would have 2- inner walls running north-south. I've looked online for plans, but no luck yet. Thanks.
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BTW, tall side would be to the south and would have overhead doors and solar collectors.
 

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No plans, but here's a few thoughts:

1. If you go 32 x 48 with 2 interior walls going n/s, then you end up with 3 bays each 16 x 32.

2. If you want your roof joists running front to back (n/s), then I think you would need a bearing wall or beam/posts running east/west about halfway back. In that situation, I would want to re-think the n/s interior walls unless you need the space subdivided for a particular reason.

I have been thinking about a similar shop/garage structure and am figuring that the single slope shed roof facing north should offer best protection from wind chill and maximize solar collection opportunities, which I assume is your thinking as well. I am kicking around the idea of using straw bale construction so that the solar heat gain is preserved for maximum effect.
 

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How big and how many doors?
How many bays?
What slope for the roof?

Give that info and I can draw it up using AutoCAD.
I would be able to give you general floor plan and elevations.
 

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Mono pitch roof is a term that I'm not faniliar with. Is that what could be called a shed roof? Would you want the roof to be a truss full of cross braces, a truss with a useful second level or just roof joists from front to back, high in the front, low in the back?
What is your snow load. I'm thinking that most of the snow around Red Deer Laks would blow off, but you'd want to build for the time it didn't.

A 32 foot truss wouldn't need a center support. A 48 foot truss could be built to work without center supports, but would take a lot of lumber.
 

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My version of mono-slope roof means a lean-too look, just one slope to it, not peaked or anything.

That would sure be difficult to do on such a large building, so must not be what you mean.

Here in Minnesota, you always - always! - want most of the doors in the end of the building, not on the side. Snow slides off the side & makes it very, very - very! frustrating to get the doors open.

I've been dealing with dad's mistake on that for all of my life.....

You need to look into snow loads, depending on the actual slope of the roof, you may need much more than 2x6 for construction of this size.

Would need a lot more detail of wall height, what roof you mean, and how big the doors are, to get real info on how to build this. It is bigger than the little sheds, and we have real snow up here to deal with, don't want to get it wrong. :)

Have you stopped by a Menard's and worked through their touch-screen shed builder, prints out a materials list to give you a wild idea of what you need to to get the type of building size you are looking for?

--->Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
...If you want your roof joists running front to back (n/s), then I think you would need a bearing wall or beam/posts running east/west about halfway back. In that situation, I would want to re-think the n/s interior walls unless you need the space subdivided for a particular reason.

I have been thinking about a similar shop/garage structure...
Interesting that that you've been thinking about a similar structure. Posts & beams as you described would be OK, and I would also want the interior walls to subdivide. The best insulated room would be in the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
How big and how many doors?
How many bays?
What slope for the roof?

Give that info and I can draw it up using AutoCAD.
I would be able to give you general floor plan and elevations.
Thanks for your interest. Still in early planning for this. May or may not contact you by PM.
 

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A mono slope like that wouldn't be any problem, the trusses might be more money than you want to spend but it's possible. There are a number of buildings around here with 50-60' single span monoslope trusses, some of them are half-scissors. The half-scissors would give you some nice door space. It might be more economical to find a steel frame for a building like that though.

Kinda depends on how you want to use it and what for? A 32x48 shop would be no use to me with any walls inside it, I'm working on a 44x48 single space inside a 44x88 building right now, but I'm probably working on bigger machinery than you'd have to. Your own needs make a big difference, got a friend here working in his 120x200 farm shop and when he's doing his winter maintenance in there it's crowded.
 

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Thanks for your interest. Still in early planning for this. May or may not contact you by PM.
No problem
As others have said, snow load would be the problem with a single run across a 32' wide building..
The slope would have to be pretty steep to get the snow to slide to the north side of the building, unless you used snow dogs/hooks, but then the trusses would have to be heavier to accommadate the weight.

Good luck with the planning
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Haypoint and Rambler, what some call a mono pitch roof is probably more often called a shed roof, but I've seen the term shed roof used on your basic pole shed type roof too, so that's why I said mono pitch. As Rambler said, this would have a lean-to look. And I too have seen a lot of snow buildup along the side door of a pole shed and I don't want to have that problem. So that's another reason why I like this simple 'shed' shape. Cowboy Joe, your first link shows the basic shape, but I would not want that small section of roof on the tall side. I'd want the shed roof to extend outward at least a few feet, in part to provide summer shade.
Regarding snow load, good question. I'd want the roof pitch to be sort of shallow, so that snow would build up and help with insulation.
Lots of details to work out. I wish there would be a HT forum to do that in. I'm not experienced with building construction but would like to learn the hows and whys of the design and construction, and to help the crew that would put up the building.
 

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I'd want the roof pitch to be sort of shallow, so that snow would build up and help with insulation.
No.

That does not work.

No.

No part of that sentence works in Minnesota.

No.

(This would bring me to the other machineshed dad/I have, which I have been on top of more often that I ever wanted to shovel off 3 foot drifts..... You want a picture of the depressed roof where the snow load got too much?)

Snow melts at 32 degrees, it has no value at all for roof insulation. It only creates ice dams.

A shallow roof of that size is certainly doable, but requires much more than 2x6 wood. You will need sturdy engineered trusses, steel might be more ecconomical.

I'm also planning bigger machine shed, I think i mentioned somewhere I had to deflate the tires on my combine to get it in the shed.... Anyhow, I'm location-challenged with hills in my yard, the only flat spot is covered in a lovely grove of nice hardwoods that protect my other sheds from huge snow drifts. So I plan & struggle with a location that works but doesn't take down the trees....

A steep slope allows using smaller wood, but it will be longer. A shallow slope is shorter pieces, but much much more massive up here in Minnesota with snowloads. A peaked roof instantly gets cheaper to build, with the middle ridge carrying so much stress load, the 2 sides of the roof can be much less massive.

Not talking you out of the monoslope. You might want to look at livestock buildings for ideas, a lot of them tend to be mono. With livestock laws in Minnesota, there are now huge, 300x100 or bigger mono roofs to cover feedlots - can't let it rain on the manure you know.... So it can be done. There are all massive iron truss things tho.

But the snow insulation, leave the snow there idea does _not_ work. Nope. No. No-how.

--->Paul
 

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No.

That does not work.

No.

No part of that sentence works in Minnesota.

No.

(This would bring me to the other machineshed dad/I have, which I have been on top of more often that I ever wanted to shovel off 3 foot drifts..... You want a picture of the depressed roof where the snow load got too much?)

Snow melts at 32 degrees, it has no value at all for roof insulation. It only creates ice dams.

A shallow roof of that size is certainly doable, but requires much more than 2x6 wood. You will need sturdy engineered trusses, steel might be more ecconomical.

I'm also planning bigger machine shed, I think i mentioned somewhere I had to deflate the tires on my combine to get it in the shed.... Anyhow, I'm location-challenged with hills in my yard, the only flat spot is covered in a lovely grove of nice hardwoods that protect my other sheds from huge snow drifts. So I plan & struggle with a location that works but doesn't take down the trees....

A steep slope allows using smaller wood, but it will be longer. A shallow slope is shorter pieces, but much much more massive up here in Minnesota with snowloads. A peaked roof instantly gets cheaper to build, with the middle ridge carrying so much stress load, the 2 sides of the roof can be much less massive.

Not talking you out of the monoslope. You might want to look at livestock buildings for ideas, a lot of them tend to be mono. With livestock laws in Minnesota, there are now huge, 300x100 or bigger mono roofs to cover feedlots - can't let it rain on the manure you know.... So it can be done. There are all massive iron truss things tho.

But the snow insulation, leave the snow there idea does _not_ work. Nope. No. No-how.

--->Paul
:rotfl:
I think he got the point..
I happen to agree with the steel joists and such..
 

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just_sawin:

Did any engineering go into the roof, other than "thats what they did, and its held so far?" If so, what was the snow load for the design? If I'm not mistaken, TN typically has 10psf snow loads, and NW MN has 42psf. That's a big difference.

As long as the roof is designed correctly, it should be fine. The simple 2x6's might have to be made up into trusses to have adequate support, but that's fairly easy.


Michael
 
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