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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys i got to thinking which sometimes isn't a good thing for me.But anyway i need a bigger shop.Got to wondering why not build the frame out of metal.Like 2inch angle iron.Im thinking it would be cheaper than wood and just as simple if not easier considering im a welder(or used to be).Could even set studs farther apart like 4ft centers.Then just cover with tin,like they use for roofing and carports.Attached with self tapping screws,or pre drilled holes pending cost of s/t screws.Metal framed doors could be welded in.
It would also make grounding stuff for welding much simpler.

Hopefully ill have the money to also pore a concrete floor complete with I-beam set in it to also use for grounding (tacking and bending) and to hold up over head rolling chain host on I-beam.

Any thoughts about this? Other things to consider adding in?
 

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Think of a 10' length of timber, 2"x4". Clamp one end of it, then haul on the other end. Fairly stiff? Bends a little, then no more, right? Try the same thing with angle iron. Bends - permanent bend - keeps bending. Won't go back.

Not to say it can't be done, but it needs either an awful lot of steel (say old railroad tracks) or some very carefully designed and engineered cross-sectional shapes. Can be done - they sell the stuff - try searching on something like "steel building frame". Just not as easy as it first sounds.
 

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I'd say go for it. Years ago I knew a farmer with a shed he stored his oil products in. It was maybe 15' X 20' and fairly tall, about 15' to the ridge. It was made with a steel frame, I can't recall exactly but it seems like it was 2" angle. It was welded in 4' squares, horizontal and vertical, then sheeted in corrugated tin. That was screwed thru the angle. The tin helped tie it all into one big hunk.

In the summer, the heat radiating off the roof and sides was intense.

I'm putting an overhead track in my new shop that will extend outside. It will exit over the door. Then I can grab something from the truck and roll it inside on the track.
 

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You need to design it in a truss fashion. Look at the trusses in a prefab metal building to get the idea. Then compare cost to same type truss if you made it from plywood and 2x4s. I've made my own wood trusses and they are much more rigid and quite light compared to say 2x12s. Course compare to ready made trusses on price. Trusses now even show up at salvage type places.
 

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Tubeluer hollow steel frameing members are available everywhere, they are attached with screws in the same pattern as wood, rafters included. You might save time by exploring this method. They are getting very popular around here, maybe even a complete kit may be available. No welding ,just screw it together, I'll see if I can find some sites.
 

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You guys are taking the difficult road. May I suggest another avenue? Used pallet racking is cheap. ( I recently bought 120 lineal feet,12 feet high, with the horizontal and verticals components for only $300) Buy enough to make 2 parallel rows the length of the building you want to erect. Pour your concrete floor first, erect the pallet racking on 2 opposing sides., span between the pallet racking with trusses and affix the trusses to the top horizontal bars of the pallet racking. Space the remaining horizontal bars to where you can affix the metal for the sides to the horizontals. This will give you the skeleton structure for the entire building and all and you now have to do is to fasten the siding and the roofing. Makes a cheap and sturdy building with plenty of built in storage.
 

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There was a fellow around here made a storage shed 40X 100 out of old 5 ton truck frames. I imagine the building inspector had a fit but its still standing unchanged. I've always thought "hey, if you don't like it, don't tax it" but I'm sure they don't follow that thinking at all.
 

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Build your frame with the metal, then cover it with window screen and brush on a mix of acrylic and portland cement. The acrylic can be cement bonding agent or just junk latex paint. A bag of portland will cover about 100 square feet. Add more layers for more durability. If you buy mis-mixed paints at the hardware store, you can do a wall for about 10 cents a square foot.
 

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Wrought Iron Harv over at www.tractorbynet.com is documenting a building he is welding up from oil field pipe I believe. Might want to check it out.

I'd be concerned about using angle iron. It's very weak in 2 directions, fairly strong in the other 2. I don't think it's a good choice for structural members unless you are doubling them up somehow into a truss or tube.

There are many metal buildings, and frame iron that is designed for the job. I'd use that rather than 'just' angle iron & suppose it will be strong enough.

--->Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good lord guys its not going to be a hurricane shelter! :D

Just a shop Probably 20x30.Needed to turn water and put up with a little wind from the occasional storm. I figured 3/16 thick 1.5inch wide would be plenty strong enough.Just thinking if 2 inch wasn't that much higher id rather use it,and center the studs wider.Also 2inch would give me more surface area to hit with the screws.

The angle iron will not be carring a load(other than its own wieght and the tin), the I-beam will be set on post.One inside , one out.So i can carry things out the door like some one mentioned.

Mainly wondering if i was right, in thinking it was cheaper than wood or prefab of some type.A Carport style building this size that i priced was $8500 with a roll up door,and side entry. :eek: Hoping i can build cheaper than this.Im thinking the tin will cost more than the frame work.

Also wondering how much flex it might have in high wind (bad storm).My major concern is not it blowing down but maybe causing the screw holes to get rounded out to where it leaks. But i think buy just framing it like a normal shed it will be plenty stiff enough.Might have to brace the corners.Or maybe set the I-beam under the center of the 20 rafters would stop it from moving at all.
 

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insanity said:
Good lord guys its not going to be a hurricane shelter! :D

The angle iron will not be carring a load(other than its own wieght and the tin), the I-beam will be set on post.One inside , one out.

You never mentioned I beams before. I guess I'm not sure how you are building it, your first message mentioned _only_ 2" angle for a 20 x 30 building. That would be a disaster here in Minnesota with our snow loads.....

We need an engineering stamp, so no one up here would have much experience in design. I guess with our blizzards, that's probably not such a bad thing.... :)

Iron isn't cheap these days by the lb, so I would at least look at the pre-made metal purloins designed for this. They might pencil out cheaper - I don't know.

--->Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I, now i see, i hadn't thought about the amount of snow some of you get in other parts. ;)
The most we usually get would be 4inches.The most i ever remember getting was 8inches.
Id love to trade some sun shine for some snow this winter.But just a few inchs to play in.
You can keep the feet of snow,our houses would not stand up to that. :D
 
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