Sheering your own sheep

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by HilltopDaisy, May 15, 2006.

  1. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Looks like I'm going to have to do my two ewes myself this year. Someone recommend a pair of clippers and give me an idea of where I start and where I finish? I do my own dogs so I have an idea of how to do this, and I watched the person do my ewes last year, but I need some guidance. TIA
     
  2. Dollysmom

    Dollysmom Member

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    I just happen to have a pair of clippers for sale on this forum. Look at the "Leaving the Sheep Business" thread. If you're interested, they just might be reduced!
     

  3. Terry W

    Terry W Duchess of Cynicism

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    HIlltop
    Flip the ewes onto their rumps, start under the chin down the middle of the front, and peel!! Pull those areas where the skin wrinkles-- if you groom dogs, you know them---- armpits, loins, genital areas, etc. keep your clippers cooled and well-oiled.
    My first sheep shearing experience was crazy, I used manual shears-- sheep were WILD and hadn't been sheared in over three years-- what a mess-- but I managed to avoid impaling and eviscerating them-- tied those bad critters down, front and back, and went to it.

    Terry
     
  4. MommaSasquatch

    MommaSasquatch Well-Known Member

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    I did mine and I'm as clueless as they come. I wound up tying them to a fence post and shearing standing up. I had them in a corner so it was easier to push them against the wall so they couldn't squirm so much. It wasn't as thorough that way but worked out fine and was less traumatic for all. I used hand shears and took some household scissors to the more difficult areas because they're easier to control but much slower. I had dd dole out tiny bits of grain every couple minutes to keep them placated which really helped. Did one one day and the other the next. Took 20-30 minutes per ewe.
     
  5. seymojo536

    seymojo536 Well-Known Member

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  6. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    My 5 are miserable with their heavy coats. The only shearer I could locate works full time, then goes home and plants corn, etc., and then, if he has "spare time", shears. He says "soon", but I am afraid I may need to do mlyself. I have visions of hog tying them and using the neighbor's antique hand shears--and shudder. :Bawling:
     
  7. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I find the sheep are calmer if I place a piece of paper towel with some lavender essential oil on it into a sandwich bag. I force the sheep to breath some of this and it seems to make the ordeal easier on them.
     
  8. GR8PMKN

    GR8PMKN Well-Known Member

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    Hubby Called me and told me to pick up a sheep Shears. I went to Farm & fleet and I was looking at the electric ones and they were 240.00. WOW for 1 sheep... SO I opted to buy the 10.00 sheep shears. It was alot of work and I had never done it. But my husband put the sheep on it's side and I pulled the wool back and there was a dandruff line and I started to cut below that. It worked out very well that way.It took me about 2 hours. At least the wool was off her. We just picked up 2 more sheep and they also have not been sheered in a year or two... Should be fun..

    April