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Hey Everyone
I have some questions! :confused: I was playing soccer with a good freind of mine and, for some odd reason we got on the topic of sheep, she said when she was little she had a sheep that did not need to be shorn in the spring or :eek: summer, and I said what, i had no idea what she was talking about. She said it just molted. Well any way here is my questions can they do that, and if so what breed. I would love all the help i can get. Thanks a bunch.....
Lynn :)
 

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Even if that were true, and I much doubt it, what would be the point?
Sheep are raised because of their duel purpose use. Wool and meat.

Sometimes childhood memories get a little mixed up. My guess is, that is what happened to your friend. I could be wrong. It has happened before. Once..... maybe. :haha:
 

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Could have been Soays, Shetlands, Icelandics or another primitive breed. Some of them shed their wool if they are not sheared and don't seem to be any worse for the experience.

Also, it could have been a hair sheep breed, which also do not need to be sheared.

Hair Sheep Breeds
 

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Corky said:
Sheep are raised because of their duel purpose use. Wool and meat.
Not necessarily. I raise Shetlands and my primary purpose is for their fleece. I can't imagine anyone raising them for meat as there is not much on them. On the other hand, a breed like a Dorper doesn't have much value for wool but is an excellent meat sheep. Point is that some sheep are dual purpose, but others are specialized. Some people want meat sheep and have no interest in dealing with shearing.
 

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There are many hair breeds (Barbados Blackbelly, St. Croix or Katahdin to name a couple). They are kept for the meat. When I was looking into getting into sheep, it costs almost as much to have them shorn as what the wool is worth to be sold. Unless you have them in the suits to keep their wool super clean.
The hair sheep don't need as much medication nor hoofs trimmed etc. either.



Corky said:
Even if that were true, and I much doubt it, what would be the point?
Sheep are raised because of their duel purpose use. Wool and meat.

Sometimes childhood memories get a little mixed up. My guess is, that is what happened to your friend. I could be wrong. It has happened before. Once..... maybe. :haha:
 

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We have Barbados Black belly hair sheep and a St Croix hair sheep.

Neither of them have to be shorn as they shed their hair each summer.

The meat from the lambs we have butchered is fabulous and with a mild taste, just the way we like it.
 

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Try to start as young as possible. The younger, the easier to tame. Then put them in a pen so that they rely on you for food and water. They will tame down pretty quickly, especially if you offer them treats. Mine were pretty wild to begin with but now they follow me everywhere. They will still "spook" like deer when something frightens them (even rabbits). I really like them myself.
 

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I'm not sure how wild Barbados sheep are, but all I keep my Katahdin hair sheep in with is 2 strands of electric fence. And, I find them like all other animals you have some super tame ones and some that just want nothing to do with you! Just like cows, some can tame right down and the next crazy one well, you know....... If you only have a couple for pets, they will probably get quiet.
 

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Farmgirl8388 said:
Hey Everyone
I have some questions! :confused: I was playing soccer with a good freind of mine and, for some odd reason we got on the topic of sheep, she said when she was little she had a sheep that did not need to be shorn in the spring or :eek: summer, and I said what, i had no idea what she was talking about. She said it just molted. Well any way here is my questions can they do that, and if so what breed. I would love all the help i can get. Thanks a bunch.....
Lynn :)

check out dorper sheep, I have them and they are called New Zealand Dorpers, Australian dorper...and I have not sheared one of mine (7 months old) now. Her brother went to the fair and was sheared and looked very handsome however.
 
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