sheep shouldn't eat...

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by MaKettle, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    416
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    Oct 1, 2003
    :help: ...No rain. Nothing left in pasture. However, on the other side of the fence there is LOTS to eat. Am about to order an electric netting thingie to make an enclosure for them, but need to check with you guys first. In this area are a few goldenrod, some milkweed, grapevine, mulberry sprouts, poison ivy, and a couple blackberry seedlings, and some wild rose shrubs. They have already decided not to eat grapevine and milkweed, so that must not be to their liking. How about the other stuff--do I need to get out the machete and hack out anything?
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Location:
    Ontario
    Personally I hate those electronets and would suggest regular ol electric fencing instead. My Sheep have eaten all of the above except maybe Mulberry and have multiplied just fine on it.
     

  3. Petsguy

    Petsguy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    114
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    Mar 16, 2005
    Location:
    IL
    My Sheep LOVE Mulberry leaves and the berries too. I cut off the branches when pruning and give to my sheep and goats as a treat. They go crazy for it.

    Take Care,
    Jeff Port
    Smallville Miniatures and Exotics
    Peoria, IL
     
  4. decamper

    decamper Well-Known Member

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    Mar 3, 2005
    Location:
    Staunton, IL
    Well, Illinois is as dry as it can be. I bought electronet fencing and a solar charger the beginning of spring. I have to move it alittle every day now but in the spring I moved it every few days. The 5 sheep, 5 lambs, 1 llama, and 2 angora goats even cleaned up the poison ivy in the timber. They too love mulberry leaves as well as maple leaves. Some of my sunflowers weren't doing very well due to lack of rain so I moved the fencing so they could eat that area. The ground is now so dry that I have to use water, I take it out of the trough and replace it with fresh water, to moisten the ground so I can push the fencing rods in. Needless to say, we've had to do very little mowing this year between the drought and the animals.

    I haven't found anything that bothers them but I do keep them away from the pokecherry. Heard that was bad for sheep and goats. Not sure if it is true but I haven't taken a chance.