sheep fence

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Callieslamb, May 12, 2007.

  1. Callieslamb

    Callieslamb Well-Known Member

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    What kind of fence do you need to keep sheep in? how tall? I am thinking 4 ft- welded wire, with metal posts?
     
  2. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    We have found that using more wooden posts gives a tighter fence, and if the fence isn't tight enough the sheep go underneath and escape.

    We use wooden posts at the corners, with "H"s made for sturdiness, then every other post (spaced 10-12 feet apart on level runs, closer where it gets hilly) can be a metal t-post.

    Good luck! Pound those posts in now while the ground's still wet from spring rains. :)
     

  3. Slev

    Slev Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I say DON'T go with the "H"s on your wooden posts! I made all of my corners with the H system, and one day coming home early from work I saw a coyote troting in on my pasture. At first I thought it was a dog out there so I went to look. That frightened him off and he turned and used the H as a step and right over he went! I couldn't believe I seen it with my own eyes!

    But since we've had the LGD's ...nothing "visits" my pastures, for very long.
     
  4. wendle

    wendle Well-Known Member

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    I've never used welded wire for sheep, we used to for bird pens, it seen seems to rust and fall apart much quicker than woven wire.
    If you want a good permanent fence go with the taller woven wire 4 foot should do it. Red brand is the good kind in my area. The lighter weight stuff tends to slump after a while and gets distorted easier. I use t posts and wood posts. Don't use landscape timbers they won't last.
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I use corner brace posts in an N configuration. Slev if you saw him use the H you could have set a snare there (if legal) and leashed the coyote up for disposal. The coyotes here can jump 4 feet easily so we top the wire with barbed. Sheep go under rather than over, unless the fence is temptingly low.
     
  6. redbudlane

    redbudlane Head Zookeeper

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    We are using 4 ft. woven wire with t-posts. Our corner and brace posts are hedge with a metal brace between (think N configuration). You have to get your fence pulled tight so it doesn't sag, then they could get out underneath. We also have had good luck using 4 strands of electric fence (narrow tape) to seperate pastures. Don't rely on this to keep rams from ewes but to keep the sheep seperate from donkeys or goats it has worked fine.

    A lot depends on what you are trying to keep out as much as what you are trying to keep in. We don't have a problem here with keeping anything out since the pastures are right next to the house and we have the two dogs. We have had coyotes sit across the road but they have never crossed over because of the dogs. We have never found the sheep (Shetlands) to test fencing.
     
  7. Callieslamb

    Callieslamb Well-Known Member

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    Many thanks.

    I can use the wooden posts every other one and on the corners - using cement on the corners too. I can see where woven wire would be better. If I put an "N" or "H" inside the fence, would that allow the sheep to climb over -like the fox? I believe I can get it tight enough so they can't go under - I think the woven wire would be easier than welded.

    I don't have anything to keep out except the neighbor's dogs and whatever wild animal wants to tackle those two. I fenced my garden to keep the deer and rabbits out - didn't see any of that. There is a nice hay fiend right behind us and a forest on the other side of that. Much easier pickings - and no dogs. The garden fence pretty much just keeps the dogs out.

    Thanks!
     
  8. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    You wont have to worry about sheep climbing anything.
     
  9. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    I read somewhere fences do not keep sheep in, they keep preditors out. My guess is that pretty much anything will do that will stop them from wandering as they graze. Goats, on the other hand, is an entirely different matter, from what I have heard.

    donsgal
     
  10. Goatsandsheep

    Goatsandsheep Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Are fences are 4 ft woven wire and t-post. Corners pipe with a foot weld in a two feet hole and the post with a gate have a brace. I've had sheep fall over a fence when stand up and lean up or over to get something and a couple of jumpers but none that climb over. Biggest problem is when they rub/scratch on the fence thats a lot of weight push and lean on the fence.
     
  11. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    We use high tension electric wire on one pasture. It works ok for sheep.

    The best fence we have is at our other pasture. It is horse fence. woven wire that has 3" x 5" holes in it. It is not welded wire but twisted around.

    On the inside we run 1 hot wire about 5 inches off. The sheep do not tare it up. They seem to like it. It keeps all the dangers out. We do not even have the electric on anymore.
     
  12. Callieslamb

    Callieslamb Well-Known Member

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    Boy, are you guys full of info. I love it!

    Now for the nitty gritty - what is a "t-post"? One of those metal posts?

    I really want to raise a couple of sheep just for meat. We only have just under an acre that is free but it is a great pasture! I know, I mow it all the time now. UGH.
     
  13. Goatsandsheep

    Goatsandsheep Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A t-post is a metal post you pound into the ground you can get them at stores like home depot or tractor supply. G&S
     
  14. FreeRanger

    FreeRanger Well-Known Member

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    Well I am suprised to learn that no one is using electric netting from Premier1! :shrug:

    I love it. Use it extensively for summer paddocks. In the winter my sheep are behind a combination of woven wire and cattle panels by the barn. In the summer they are only held in by the use of 38" high Electronet from Premier1 and four strand electric twine (also from Premier1) on temporary powerpost. I run both shetland and commercial cross sheep together. I do move the rams in late summer to either woven wire paddock or dog collars with 16' cable on a t-posts (for rotational grazing the lawn).

    I run the twine along the contour of my hillside for 500 feet four times with the grey stepin power post. (Spool of 2000 feet). That make the main power line for the charger. THen I build an L shape with the netting (80' legs) tying into the mainline for power. Then build a another L next to the first to close the paddock into an 80x80 space with the top of the box made from the four strand line and the three other sides made from the netting. With three pieces of netting I can make two paddocks next to each other. When the sheep finish the first area, I let them into the second. Take down the first L and rebuild at the other end to make a third paddock. Continue doing this until the 500 foot mainline is used up. So about six paddocks. Then I swing around to the other side of the mainline and do another six paddocks. That makes 12 paddocks with just three pieces of netting, 2000ft of electric twine and 20 power post. I can set this up anywhere on any slope. Even shape paddocks around my trees on the lawn if needed. I have even left town for 12 days (twice) with nothing but a super large paddock made from this arrangement. No loose sheep!
     
  15. Somerhill

    Somerhill Well-Known Member

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    I vote for high tensile electric perimeter fencing, and using electronet for the divisions. I agree FreeRanger, netting is the BEST! We have zillions of rolls. (well, maybe only billions) :rolleyes:

    Lisa at Somerhill
    www.somerhillfarm.com
     
  16. FreeRanger

    FreeRanger Well-Known Member

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    I have only 7 rolls and I can't think of a need for any more if you have time to take them down and put them back up (which usually I have). I don't like to put my sheep back on the same ground for at least 30 days to break the worm cycle. Sometimes I will make hay on the ground before they go back or before they are put on the ground. Lots of flexibilities.

    You can make the mainline with one net and the L's with the others, so as to not need the twine type fence line. I do that occassionally to put the sheep at the top of the hillside instead of the bottom. That's where I have trouble with deer jumping in to get to the water and salt.

    They seem to hold together well. The only long term problem I have is with deer getting tangled in them. Then I occassionally lose one of the built in post because it's in tall grass. We eventually find it after making hay or having the sheep eat the grass down. If the netting breaks, you just splice (tie) it back together.
     
  17. flannelberry

    flannelberry Pure mischief

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    I do and I cannot say enough good about it - keeps the pyr and the sheep in. I think everyone who has any stock shoudl have it, it's already saved my butt in a couple of would-be emergencies.
     
  18. Slev

    Slev Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I do have several rools of electro-net fence, but only for dividing up the inside property. I thought he was mainly asking for advice on property line fence. I still have to get my act together for the electro-net.

    What size of chargers does everyone use? no wait, I'll start a new thread for that....