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Yesterday two of our sheep (who were separated from the rest at the time), were attacked by a large dog. We pulled them out of the holes they were hiding in and brought them down to be with the others, which seem to perk them up. At first they certainly seemed in shock, normally we can't even catch them let alone handle them. The female has many lacerations on one back side, lots of wool missing. Both pretty much just look chewed up in places. They are standing with the others now. We are trying to raise nonmedicated sheep, but since this is a special circumstance and these aren't for eating, but breeding we will use antibiotics if needed. How much? I have LA 2000 left from last year- a full bottle. Any other tips? We sort of follow a "natural order" sort of philosophy. But this is the only ram we have, and so would have to buy another if this one is put down. I prefer not to intervene unless absolutely neccesary, if too much is required I'd rather just put them down than make them suffer.
 

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We had this happen a couple years ago, except when we go tto the sheep, it was down and chilled. The most important thing we learned about sheep care through that was never let them lay on their side. If they are down, prop them up on their brisket. However, it sounds like your's are up and about, so personally I would give them the LA200 (since it only needs given once or possibly twice) and just keep a close eye on them. Their skin is pretty thin, so it looks really bad when they get chewed up, but them being up and around is a good sign. Hope they make it....oh, did the dog issue get resolved? They will be back if not.
 

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I have a thick iodine gel that a vet once gave to me :confused: sorry I can't remember the name of it now! :( that we use liberally in any cuts the sheep get at shearing time. The vet used it deeply inside a wound on a newly shorn ewe who ripped her shoulder open on a fence a few years ago. The stuff is amazing and it help prevent dirt getting into the wound. If I were you, I would catch them and carefully look them over for any large wounds that will need stitches and get them stiched! A lot of wool can hide a bad wound. Good luck!
 

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I agree with the above advise, and your approach. Sometimes it sounds like a lot is being done to a sick sheep when really it takes ten times the words to describe it than actually do it. Without knowing how much vitamin A is available to the sheep I'd suggest an optional injection of AD. They were stressed pretty badly and sheep loose a lot of vitamin A under stress. An oral dose would be fine too or good leafy green feeds (so long as it isn't a big change in their diet. if they aren't close to lambing (and I guess the ram isn't !) then the risk of meatbolic disturbance should be low. Keep the wounds clean (that gel sounds great!) or use any good wound dressing for a couple of days. I'll flog my favorite spray Boroform, it's top notch and helps seal the wound.
 
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Well we took the natural course by default so far. Both are up and around, though the ewe limps a little more than the ram. But then we saw the ram was sitting down (not on his side) but n0ot chewing his cud. I will go try to find all the goodies listed today to have on hand. unless they get worse we are going to have a hard time catching them to treat them without causeing them alot more stress. (These weren't very touchy feely sheep. ;)
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Its been said here before but it needs restated!KILL THE DOGS!Or it will soon be a habit with them! Then they start to bring their friends with them and it the end of your sheep herd!Take a quiet gun and a shovel and get it done!
 

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I had 2 goats attacked by a neighbors dog years ago. My goats were fenced ---a Nubian and a Toggenberg----and the dog got in. I was home but by the time I heard the noise he was running them in their area. He hamstrung the Nubian and bit the Tog several times on the sides and back. I got him off, grabbed him and ---well, lets say he didn't make it home alive. We had trouble with these people who were not critter people and lived about an eighth of a mile down the road. Many times we had asked, beggged and told them about the dog, to no avail. I had to take the goats to the vet, who BTW, hated goats, and the Nubian had to be EU'd. The Tog was ok. The dog was happy in dog heaven.

Once a dog runs animals they will always run them unless they are really well fenced or kept in. Not worth it to me to own a dog that runs critters.
 
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