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I may get corrected, too, but I use a 1"X30" belt sander to work all the knicks out and grind the bevel the way I like, then deburr with a stone.
 
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Ed Norman said:
I may get corrected, too, but I use a 1"X30" belt sander to work all the knicks out and grind the bevel the way I like, then deburr with a stone.
that's what I do, and I own a sharpening shop. http://professionaltool.com/

If it is reaaly chipped bad, I will start with a 4" grinder, then go to the 1 x 30 belt sander
 

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ive used a mill file to sharpen my axes and an oil stone to take the wire edge off and give that final little bit of edge. on the other hand ive used a belt grinder to good effect when the edge is badly beaten up and then use the stone. i use similar techniques to make my knives from good steel stock as well ( the grinder that is not the file :baby04: :rolleyes: )

dean
 

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Old Boy scout method of a flat file with a leather piece on the tang between the file and handle with the axe mounted firmly.
 

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You could always buy the book by my buddy John Juranitch from Ely Minnesota, called "The Razor Edge Book of Sharpening." That's John in the photo below:

 

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Wow. I just carry 2 files with me - coarse for dings, fine for putting more edge on. It's hard to carry power grinders back in the woods. Works for my scythe as well.
 
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caberjim said:
Wow. I just carry 2 files with me - coarse for dings, fine for putting more edge on. It's hard to carry power grinders back in the woods. Works for my scythe as well.
a file works really well. I file quite a bit of stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well according to the book woodcraft by A.R. Harding you are supposed to use a file or coarse grind stone (the pedle type I'm sure) and smooth out the factory ground edge starting 2 to 3 inches from the cutting edge so as not to have a sharp drop down to your edge. At the same time you want to have the thickest part of you blade be about 2/3 of the way from the bottom. It is supposed to help pop out the chips. I just finnished up my hatchet and this method works great. I'm fixing to start on my axe next. I was just wondering if this was something everyone knew or if it was a hidden treasure I had found. Sounds like the latter is true.
 

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michiganfarmer said:
a file works really well. I file quite a bit of stuff
There are times, tho, that I sit and file and dream of a power grinder.
 

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i use an antique knife sharpening stone thats 1"x1"x1' thats 50-50 fine and coarse... i start at the spine or rear of the axe head going towards the edge... neve at the edge towards the spine.

works quite well... use it to split almost all my wood
 

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tryinhard said:
Does anyone here know the proper way to sharpen an axe?
Go to Gransfors Bruks Axe Book and you can download a very good Axe how to book (including sharpening) for FREE or you can complete the form and they will mail it to you.

Good Luck :)
 

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4sarge said:
Go to Gransfors Bruks Axe Book and you can download a very good Axe how to book (including sharpening) for FREE or you can complete the form and they will mail it to you.

Good Luck :)
The Gransfors Bruks axes have got to be the very best axes made today! There's nothing better than Swedish steel and the craftsmanship is impeccible. These axes are almost too good to use. If I had one, I'd just hang it on the wall to admire.

(Sorry for the thread drift)
 

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Cabin Fever said:
The Gransfors Bruks axes have got to be the very best axes made today! There's nothing better than Swedish steel and the craftsmanship is impeccable. These axes are almost too good to use. If I had one, I'd just hang it on the wall to admire.

(Sorry for the thread drift)
No reason to be sorry because they are indeed great axes but becoming harder to find and always for more money :shrug: I own several but wood like to own more since they have just a wide variety of specialized axes :)
 
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