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Septic tank flooding question

I got a 16 year old 1000 gallon septic tank attached to a leach field. The field has five lateral each 100 feet long. During heavy rain 2+inches at a time my tank will become flooded. After 35-48 hours it’s back to normal level. Never any backups in the house or drain issues. I also have no standing water in my leach field. I’ve added some soil to low spots in my field and reseeded with grass but I’m not sure what else I could do to fix this issue. Maybe a curtain drain? But I don’t have a lot of runoff from anywhere else onto the field. Is it possible that the water table has risen enough over the years that it is infiltrating my laterals during heavy rains now? Thanks for the help!
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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The top of your septic tank is leaking surface water into your tank. Also your tank walls or lid may also be cracked and or leaking.

You need an inspection.
 
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I am not an expert, but living in Florida during " hurricanado" season, many of us have this problem. Usually nature will correct this problem in a couple of days. Make sure you don't have a leaking toilet which adds even more water to the tank. Limit washing clothes & dishes , take quick showers , " PEE " twice or even more/Flush once , etc., etc., to conserve water going to the tank & fields. DO NOT pump out septic tank when it is flooded like this. The tank may rise due to the water & THEN you will have a problem. You can have it pumped out after it is dry. Link below has tips.

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An old friend of mine had a similar issue.
He had lived in a house for about 20 years since it was new. There was never an issue with the septic system that he was aware of. Everything always flushed and drained like it did when new.
He decides one spring to put his house up for sale. He gets an offer in 3 days. They sign a contract and the buyer orders a septic inspection. It then begins raining. It rains almost non stop for 10 straight days.
The guy has heavy clay soil and most any heavy rain turns the ground into pudding and unwalkable.
The septic inspector arrives, pulles the lid and sees that the tank is full. He fails the system.
The seller says he has no issues inside, no green spots in the yard, so soggy areas.
The septic guy tells him sorry, he can only judge the system by what he sees the day he is there.
He gets a quote of 14k to replace the system. He is furious.
He calls a second company and has it pumped. Ground water is backflowing thru the drain and into the tank as fast as they can pump it out.
Long story short, the water had no place to go as the soil was completely saturated. The soil in the leech field was marginal, however, and it came down to replace the system or lose the sale.

My brother in laws home has a 40 year old system on sandy soil that passed an inspection last summer.

A good and thorough inspection can give you more accurate and better answers than we can.
 

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If it were mine I'd have that septic tank cleaned out; and in the process examine it closely for possible exterior leaks. Your distributor tank may also need looked at which the plumber can do at the same time as the septic.
 

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We have also had a leak where the drain field line leaves the tank.
 

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Rain water is not sneaking into your septic tank through a crack and causing a flood. A septic system doesn't work like that. The 1000 gallon septic tank takes the sewage from the house. It's mostly water. The solids sink to the bottom and compost. The liquid goes out to the leach bed and filters through the gravel and filters into the ground or is taken up by the grass roots. It is important to have a leach field that will percolate water away from it. It can't be solid clay , solid rock or flooded. Sounds like water is staying in the leach field. The rain fills the leach field and the water runs back into the septic tank. It could be all the grease and crap from the garbage disposal has plugged up the drain field. Someone could have driven over it, crushing the drain tiles. Something has changed to raise the ground water level. If enough crushed stone wasn't used and that added soil you've put on it has plugged the drain tiles.

Years ago, as I was building my new home on a lake, neighbors built their dream home. The only high ground was away from the lake, between the house and road. But the soil was red clay, level from the road to the house. Their septic tank was installed and a big rectangle dug out for the drain field. The drain field was lots of gravel, drain pipes, covered in sand and top soil. Because they had a bathroom in the walkout basement, they had a sewage pump in the basement floor that pumped sewage up to the sewer line and out to the septic tank. After a rain, all the water stayed on the clay's surface, but the drain field was a rain water collection point. It attracted water untill itt reached the level of the surrounding level clay surface. That created water pressure into the septic tank and against the basement's sewage pump. The pump failed. The pressure pushed the pump's impellers backwards, allowing all the drain field's rain water to travel through the septic tank and into the sewage sump in the basement floor. Luckily, that is sealed. But, it didn't take long for the pressurized sewage to find the lowest opening. That was the toilet bowl. sewage water backed up flowed out the toilet, spreading out of the Master Bath, into both the family room and Master Bedroom. It was nearly 2 inches deep on the new carpet and wood paneling, before it silently cascaded out the base of the sliding glass doors. Following that incident, the County Health Department pulled my permit and added a requirement that my sewage be pumped to a lot across the street to a sandy spot. That upgrade cost me many thousands of dollars.
 

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Yep, sounds like the leech field simply gets water filled and won't take any more, so you can no longer flush or drain anything from the house.
I fought this stuff for several years and added length to my leech lines a couple times as a short term fix. Finally bit the bullet and put in a complete new larger tank and new large leech field, haven't had a problem since (knock on wood).

If you have the real estate to do it, expanding the leech field would be the easiest fix.
 
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