Septic system chlorine tube questions...

Discussion in 'How-To Threads of the past' started by cityboyinthecountry, Apr 27, 2020.

  1. cityboyinthecountry

    cityboyinthecountry Member

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    Just moved from the city to a 5-acre property in rural MO. There will be many more questions to come for sure.

    Our septic system has a 4-inch tube for chlorination, but there doesn't appear to be a chlorination tube to put the tablets into.

    My question is about how to accomplish this. I have seen chlorine feeder tubes that you load the "cakes" into then that goes into the 4-inch access tube. Most of the tablet tubes I have seen are 24" long which would not even reach down to the water level in my tank.

    I put a stick down to get a measurement, and think I felt gravel on the bottom of this tank (is that normal?).

    I am assuming the tablets need to be submerged, but is it just below the water level? Is it to the bottom? (that seems like it would be covering multiple tablets and not proper dispersal).

    Further, what keeps the tube from being lost down the bigger pipe?

    Need some basic education here. I haven't been able to find enough detailed information and I would like to see how others are doing this.
     
  2. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO Be powerful. No other option exists. Supporter

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    One of my systems has a tube for liquid chlorine. You need to find out for sure which system you have.
     

  3. cityboyinthecountry

    cityboyinthecountry Member

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    Mine takes "cakes". I know that much because they told me as much during the inspection. But they didn't elaborate on how to actually do it.
     
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  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    The chlorine tablets stack into the tube. The tube is located between the septic/treatment tank and the effluent pump tank. As the effluent moves from one tank to the other, it passes through the chlorine tablets. As the effluent rises in the pump tank, it will trip a pump switch (float) and the effluent tank will empty. The pump sends the disinfected effluent to a drainfield or spray irrigation system.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. cityboyinthecountry

    cityboyinthecountry Member

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    Thank you Cabin Fever. Unfortunately, this is not my system. I don't have any pumps and drainage is to a lagoon.
     
  6. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    There should not be any gravel in the bottom of a pump tank, unless this is a really old system and that last tank is a dry well.
     
  7. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Then what you likely have is likely a typical septic tank with 4" inspection (monitoring) tubes.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. cityboyinthecountry

    cityboyinthecountry Member

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    I have three openings. The main primary input where the solids are (and where the tank was pumped from), the middle where the aerator goes, then the last one where I'm told a chlorine tablet basket or something similar should go.
     
  9. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    I have seen two-compartment septic tanks that have three inspection tubes. If your effluent is being pumped - sorry you said there are no pumps - drained to a lagoon, I don't see why it would have to be disinfected first. Disinfection of septic effluent is generally required for one of two reasons (1) when the effluent is discharged to a drainfield that is placed just above the watertable and (2) when the effluent is sprayed onto the homeowner's yard.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    You have an aerobic treatment unit (ATU). Every ATU that I have seen have three inspection risers and/or manholes that come to (or above) the surface of the soil. A chlorination unit can be used with these systems, but again, if your system is discharging to a lagoon, I am very doubtful that one was placed into your ATU.
     
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  11. cityboyinthecountry

    cityboyinthecountry Member

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    Our lagoon is getting overrun with algae and it is my understanding that chlorinating our output will help with that.
     
  12. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    There is nothing wrong with algae in a septic lagoon. A septic lagoon is a biological treatment system, it is not a swimming pool. The algae is helping to treat the wastewater. In fact, the algae are a sign that the water in the lagoon contains dissolved oxygen. A lagoon is full of helpful microorganisms that are breaking down the nutrients and solids that are dissolved and/or suspended in the discharged effluent. Don't "kill" your treatment system with chlorine.
     
  13. cityboyinthecountry

    cityboyinthecountry Member

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  14. Miguel Martinez

    Miguel Martinez Member

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    This is a very good answer. Modern sewage treatment plants are just massive versions of a basic septic tank. Sewage comes in , is broken up with aeration. Oxygen is introduced at this time. The sewage is moved to a secondary tank or lagoon were algae and bacteria before the process of breaking down sewage into smaller particles, from there the sewage (now mostly water and algae) is chlorinated to kill off the algae before it is pumped back into rivers, lakes and marshes. The sun and the biodiversity of nature helps to remove the chlorine and clean the last little bit of "particulate". A healthy bacterial colony and good biodiversity is important for proper cleaning of the system. If you have a lagoon, the presence of algae, cat tails, duckweed and other aquatic plants are a really good sign. Don't flush chlorine or harsh chemicals into your system or you'll kill off the beneficial bacteria in the system. You can help it out by flushing rotten milk, dark beers, etc down the drain. The more biodiversity, the healthier the system.
     
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  15. MrSteve

    MrSteve Member

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    My dad built a septic system for me and my then wife that had a clorination tube. that was 40 years ago. She still lives there. Never put any tablets in the tube yet.