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I have had it sprayed on my fields in Missouri.
Just don't eat the fish in Lake of the Ozarks. In their newspaper I have read the fish have a large dose of various hormones like estrogen in them. All those houses around the lake-guess where their septic systems empty into?
 

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I researched that and couldn’t find any articles referring to that issue in that lake. Do you have a source?

Here is what I could find.

 

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I shudder to think what happens to these pump-out loads after they leave your property, and the OP's story is most likely indicative of what really happens.
About 20 years ago I was on the poor side of a medium sized city looking at investment property. I was parked along the road halfway down a cul de sac of mostly vacant run down tract homes. Here comes a pump truck right past me. They get to a vacant lot at the end of the road, which was overgrown with brush and saplings, swing around and back in.
The guy in the passenger seat gets out and goes around back.
The driver opens up a newspaper and relaxes, lol. 10 minutes later they fire up and move out.
I decided against buying anything on that street.
 

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It’s legal here in my state, where very few things are legal..... there are some rules to follow, but generally out in the country you can have your septic pumping applied to your farm land.

wouldnt want it on a garden or where carrots and peas and such are grown, but for hay land (with some time before cutting or grazing) or grain crops it’s a great fertilizer, sure wouldn’t want to see it go to a landfill or otherwise wasted?

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
It’s legal here in my state, where very few things are legal..... there are some rules to follow, but generally out in the country you can have your septic pumping applied to your farm land.

wouldnt want it on a garden or where carrots and peas and such are grown, but for hay land (with some time before cutting or grazing) or grain crops it’s a great fertilizer, sure wouldn’t want to see it go to a landfill or otherwise wasted?

Paul
I can appreciate the above.
 
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