seperating kids from mother part time?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by rootsandwings, May 5, 2006.

  1. rootsandwings

    rootsandwings Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We're expecting our first kid(s) any day. I was planning to leave the kid(s) on part time and milk once a day. When I read about people doing this, they seperate at night. would it be possible to reverse that?

    I'm asking because the way my barn is set up it would be easy to pen the doe in with her kid(s) at night and leave her with access to shelter, food, water, pasture and her friend during the day. If she spends the days with the kid(s) they will have to be all penned in the barn all the time (no pasture for mom) or all loose with the other goat during the day.

    And it won't bother anybody if the goats complain during the day, but at night it will be a pain.

    Also when you do this, when does the doe get milked in relation to being put with the kid? Milk her first and leave some for the kid then put them together?

    Also, if dd wants to bottle feed once a day will that work? could we milk out, bottle feed, and then put them together?
     
  2. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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    Either schedule can work. Do what works for your family. If it is easier to sep. kids during the day and milk at night, then that's what you should do. BTW , what is the issue that prevents you from wanting to put kids out with their mother and the "other" goat? I wouldn't keep the dam or her buddy locked away by themself. Why don't you allow them all to get together? Is the dam's companion an aggressive goat?
    I would be sure to allow the kids playtime outside during the day too. The sunshine and excercise is good for them. Maybe let them stay outside for part of the day w/mum. Also, the goats do not carry-on forever when you put them in different sleeping quarters. They will complain for the first few times, but once they realize every body is still in the barn, and they know they'll get together in the morning, everybody settles down.
    I wait until the kids are at least two weeks old before starting to pen them sep. at night. Whether you let them nurse before milking is up to you. Try letting the kids get first dibs on the udder for a few days, then try milking first(leaving some for the kids). Sometimes, if the kids get to nurse first, they will take ALL the milk. Also, I have heard that the last bit of milk that leaves the udder is higher in butterfat.
    As far as bottle-feeding, you can TRY to get the kids to accept both the nipple and a bottle. If they are going to take a bottle it is easier to do it from Day#1. Some kids won't nurse once they've learned to take a bottle, and some won't take a bottle once they have nursed from their dam. You need to realize that if you teach the kid to take a bottle, you might be stuck bottlefeeding a few times a day until they are weaned.
    I try only to bottle-feed if I HAVE to due to the kid being rejected by its dam or if there is sickness. I have been able to get a 2-3 wk. old to accept a bottle, but it is not easy. I personally prefer the kids to be dam raised, but well socialized. Others on this forum will tell you that you MUST steal the kid from its mother at birth b/c of CAE. If your goats are CAE positive, then removing kids and bottle-feeding with pasteurized milk can help prevent the kids from getting the virus. If the goats do not have CAE, and are healthy, stealing the doe's kids to bottlefeed would be just that. You need to decide if dd is going to be the kids "mom", or if the kids own dam is "mom". If you bottle-feed before putting the kids out with their dam(after being milked) they may learn that dd is the one with the easy milk supply, and may just wait for their next bottle. On the other hand, they might drink what they can from the dam and then wait to get back w/her, refusing the bottle. Maybe not. If you attempt doing both, let us know if it works.
    You will realize everyone here has different methods of raising goats, and you just have to figure out what works for you.
     

  3. rootsandwings

    rootsandwings Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thank you, I'll talk to my daughter about the bottle. She's old enough to suffer the results of her decision. She's been promised a doe kid as her own if there is one, and wanted to bottle feed for "bonding". Keeping the kid away all the time would be difficult for me, so it may stay on the dam, but if she decides to try and accidentally weans it completely then feeding it will be her chore.

    the buddy is the dominant goat. She's very good with her friend and with humans taller than she is, but thanks to my dh and son she knocks over small children. (another story) She also chases chickens. I'm not sure how she's be with a kid.

    If they were seperated, they could all see each other and the adult goats would still be able to stick their heads through the upper slats of the stall. the stall the kid would be in gets plenty of sun because it's right by the open (during the day) end of the barn and is 10x10. Some of my fence has rather large (to a kid) gaps - I didn't get my goats until they were a month old and there was still one place I had to board up. I'm a little worried a smaller kid will find a place I missed. Will they stick right by their mother, or are they likely to try to escape? the field is a square acre, but there are lots of yummy trees outside of it. (and a human playset, which was always where the first two ended up when they escaped)
     
  4. rootsandwings

    rootsandwings Well-Known Member Supporter

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    oh, and our goats are from a CAE free herd, were bottle fed anyway (because they were intended for early sale), and no other goats have ever lived here, so I believe I don't have to worry about that?
     
  5. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    they should all be fine put out togather, its better for everyone to be out in the sun during the day anyway, vitamin D that way and all, dominant goats will be bossy but as long as there is plenty of room to get away all should be fine, is it a doe that is the companyon? will she kidd soon?
    daylight is the active time for feeding and playing and everything that makes for nice strong goats so i wouldnt do the separated during the day thing,
     
  6. rootsandwings

    rootsandwings Well-Known Member Supporter

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    well, he arrived today - one buck kid. both adult goats are does, but the other isn't bred - tried 4 times with no luck.

    the dry doe was head crashing the gate for a while after the kid was born, but she settled down.

    I can't imagine this tiny little guy out in that big field! some of the grass is taller than he is. for now (tonight) he and mom are penned in one stall and the other goat is in the other the kidding stall gets afternoon sun - about half the stall - one side in the early part of the afternon and then it moves to the other by evening.

    looks like I may be milking one side while he nurses the other - so far he's stuck to the same side for every feeding. the other works fine - engorged and I milked out an ounce to check.
     
  7. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    dont let the one side stay full, eather make him nurse it or milk it off and store the colostrum, some singles wont nurse off both sides at least not at first and you will need to watch that she doesnt get Masstitis in that other side, some does do fine and can avoid any problems others will get masstitis at the drop of a hat, to be sure i would keep the side he isnt useing milked down at least even with the other,
    you can always use colostrum next season if needed.
     
  8. rootsandwings

    rootsandwings Well-Known Member Supporter

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    He had "his" side totally empty when we went in last night, so I decided to leave him the other milk. DD did the morning chores and says the kid looks great and the doe is smaller on the "extra" side than she was last night and almost as full on "his" side as the "extra". So things may be evening out. I thought I would try milking her later this morning.

    She definitely delivered the placenta yesterday (I cleaned it up) but is still having some "tissue" discharge. Is that normal? She seems fine.

    I'm planing to keep them both in for the first few days, unless she gets really restless.