Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
House front is three stories above entry way because of slope of hill- stairway goes up above porch/crawl space to first floor of 2 story home. Had Leyland cypresses at corners front of house and either side of stairs too close to stairs and porch- first one and now the second stairway cypress have toppled over from shallow roots, too much rain at once, maybe crowding of being in a corner between porch and stairs. The two cypress on the corners of home look fine so far but are different heights so maybe one fell over and was replaced before we moved here.

I am not going to bother replacing the cypress by the stairs, not even 15 feet further into front lawn so they have a chance to grow taller before probably toppling. Feel it's an unsafe gamble and Mom tells me they symbolize death- though maybe just their own stupid deaths.

DH wants Bradley pears there. I plan to put sweet olives in close to porch where cypress used to be, the trees will be further away to have a chance at adequate space etc.

Heights 8 feet of steps to porch, then another story of porch/ first floor. It'd be nice if tree rose into view from first floor eventually. It can stop there and avoid branches dripping leaves into the gutters of the roof sloping from the top story.

So do you think the Bradfords are a good idea? Any other suggestions? We are uncertain when/if we will sell- if so likely in the next 5 years, or not for a long time.

BTW unlike first cypress which fell on Xmas or Boxing Day this one fell at Easter; we cabled it to porch all year but suspecting failure I let it topple over and we have a lovely 'free' Xmas tree from the top third of that cypress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Bradfords are very nice and hardy trees. If you want that variety and they are too tall for your liking,they now have smaller varieties..........Jack and Jill. Jack is 15' tall and wide and Jill is 12' tall and wide.

If you want the larger variety, I suggest the Cleveland Select. They maintain a very nice shape that does not require a lot of up keep.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Hacon! We'll be treeshopping today so I'll take those names along!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
I can't stand Bradfords, but it's a personal thing. lol.
On the outside corners, I'd look at Crepe mertyls or river birch, although the river birches do make a bit of a mess in fall/earlty winter. I've been using quite a few Chinese/Drake elms in my designs lately. VERY tough trees, fast growing, even, consistent canopies, and although they'll lose their leaves, have a really cool bark structure that I think looks nice in winter....as trees go, they're pretty cheap, too. Other options that come to mind are Japanese red maple (which can be kinda' spendy, but are gorgeous), or Little Gem magnolia.
To frame the steps, have a look at tree-form indian hawthorne. Camelias look good year-round and cover up with blooms during a time of year when the rest of the landscape is generally lookin' pretty drab. If the standard camelias are too big for the application, sasanqua camelias are smaller and are easily kept in a narrower, Christmas tree shape.
Our Camelias are bloomin' real good down here right now, and they're BEAUTIFUL!
 

·
Master Of My Domain
Joined
·
7,220 Posts
i actually sold a 20 foot tall river birch once for a couple hundred bucks to a landscaper buddy. he dug it out himself...unfortunately it died. i think it was a bit ambitious to transplant such a large one.

one tree i really like that i never see anyone use is beech. i love the the form and the bark. i guess they can be messy, but so are many trees. a smaller tree that is somewhat similar is ironwood. it is usually an understory tree and doesn't normally get as big as the beech.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top