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Honestly, this is all new to me. Having something that I could sell..... I am overwhelmed by butternut squash! I want to sell some. But I've never done it. Is it a price for each or price per pound? Where, how do you figure that out?


Thanks in advance.
 

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My name is not Alice
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Check your local store and local farmers market to get a fix on prices. Squash store well, so it's not like you need to unload spoiling product. Butternut will be in high demand in November.

I stopped buying from the store because the charged by the pound and a single squash cost about $5. That was 2-3 falls ago. Prices may have come down.


If I were selling, I'd sell by the each, so the question of scales never enters the fray. You can weigh a few to give someone an idea about how much they weigh, then let them do the math.

Don't be afraid to charge more than the supermarket. YOUR SQUASH ARE NOT THE SAME AS THEIR SQUASH!!!
 

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I recently bought four nice sized ones at the local pumpkin patch for $2.25 each except for one slightly smaller that cost $2.
I didn't weigh them but they're what I consider average-large size.
I don't see them priced per pound very often.
 

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de oppresso liber
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Sell squash?!? Used to be a joke that the only time you locked your car door when you went into our small town was in late summer. Because if you didn't you'd come back to find someone had loaded your back seat with squash. Its the one thing everyone seems to have too much of :)
 

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The usual problem is that when you have a lot of something, everyone has a lot of it. If you can safely put some on a table on the roadside, you may sell a few. To set up at a farmers' market, there is usually a fee for the space. It can take a lot of sales to raise that, forget about gas money. You can ask friends & neighbors. I have taken pick-up truckloads of produce from my garden, true loads, not a colorful exaggeration, to a shelter in the city north of my place. They feed many people, too many :( , every day. They folks there are happy for 100 zucchinis and the men politely come unload, too. It is almost an hour's drive, but some of the cost is tax-deductible, as is a fair estimate on the produce. That I figure at the grocery-store price for organic.
 

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A man opened a 'farmer's market' store in our nearby town where he is open every day and selling/promoting local grown produce. I stopped in and picked up butternut squash for 1.00$ each.

Apples were 3.00$ for a small bag of maybe 6-7 apples.

I thought the prices were good for the consumer but low for the farmers.
 

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Define overwhelmed. Winter squash are great for keeping over the winter. What looks like an over abundance today may look like an empty shelf in February. That being said, for a quick sale check your smaller, local groceries. You won't make as much money but you'll have less hassle. Any food co ops in your area? Most are always looking for locally grown. Any upscale restaurants? Knock on the back door when the chef is prepping, not during service. Local farmers market. You'll be competing with every other producer and their abundance and trying to lure their regulars to you. A wagon at the end of the drive with a secured money box is where I usually get my winter supply. Check prices in your area but a couple bucks a squash is what I usually pay.
 
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