Selling Potted Runner Beans?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by JAS, Jun 1, 2006.

  1. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    643
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    South Dakota
    I just read on another forum that someone was selling potted scarlet runner beans. Has anyone done this at a farmers market. Do they sell? Trying to come up with some easy projects to sell at the market. Thanks.
     
  2. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    19,807
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Not at a farmers market, but I've been working part time at a local nursery. We had some bean seedlings that did not sell all that well.

    Me, I don't understand why people would need to have starters for plants that do so much better in vivo from seed.

    Oh, well.

    Pony!
     

  3. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    643
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Hi Pony, how are the chokes doing?

    That's what I was wondering. I figured for the scarlet beans it would be more of an ornamental than other beans. It might not be bad to try, since I could put them in my garden if they don't sell.

    Do you have any tips as to what did sell at the nursery that would be easy for a semi-green thumb to do? Thanks.
     
  4. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    19,807
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003

    Chokes are happy as clams! :)

    I forgot about the ornamental value of the runners.

    At the nursery, herbs are selling like crazy, especially rosemary, basils, and mints. A really popular item is strawberry pots planted with herbs: cilantro, dill, rosemary, basil, mint, thyme.

    I was also surprised at the number of people who buy tomatoes in patio planters with a tomato cage in it! I mean, how much work is there to tossing some potting soil and a plant into a bucket? But there are people who prefer that their fingers never touch soil. (Lots of North Shore customers... a very different mindset!)

    People are also clamoring for cucumber and squash seedlings. Again, I know that those do not respond especially well to transplanting, but ... Oh, well. Maybe you could pick up some inexpensive plastic pots/buckets/whatever containers, drop some soil mix in, pick up a couple six-packs of tomato seedlings, and tie the seedlings to bamboo canes for support. Easy, quick, and could be quite profitable. They sell them for $10 at the nursery.

    Now I have to get out to MY garden and get things planted. I'm off for a couple of days, so I have to catch up!

    Here's to good sales at your Farmers Market!

    Pony!