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I don't know about other folks, but I do know that anything I may have canned was done so with the idea of having enough food in the pantry for the Winter..if folks sold from their pantries, they'd find themselves short for their families..
 

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Most folks are hanging on to their canned goods due to the hard times. I never have so much I can do more than share with my family. Then,you have the worries of something going wrong and getting sued or worse.
Some folks here in Longton have home-made jellies and jams for sale. I will try to see if they would be interested in shipping some to you. It might be more expensive than you want to spend.
 

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yep, I consider my home canned food very precious and would not consider selling it..I mean, my own organic veggies and fruits are very hard won and knowing the labor, love and care I put into my foods, nope, not interested in selling them...can't put dollars on my pancakes, would rather put on my own canned berry syrups

and the liability issue....not worth the hassle...
 

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Happy Scrounger
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As both Bostonlesley and Kshobbit said, most folks here that can do so with the intention of using it for their families, or perhaps gifts. It's hard to ship canned foods, too. Very expensive (weight) and dangerous because of the shipping company (UPS, USPS, whatever) dropping/breaking the jars. :(

It would help a LOT if you put your location (even just the state you live in) on your thread in the barter board. yes, I know you're talking about shipping and all, but you'd save yourself a lot of money if someone nearby read the thread...they could PM you and say "i'll meet you at <insert city name> " . You can put your location in your Profile, if you wish, and it will show up like mine does...on the right side of any post you make. Just go to the "user CP", and edit your profile.
 

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There's also a liability issue. If someone sells you homecanned food (without a license) and you get sick from it.
this is the answer, you can't sell any home made food product without the proper licenses, the kitchen has to be inspected by the D of H, any meat has to be inspected by another dept, the hassel is more than it's worth.Shipping, shipping containers. on a small scale you would have to get 9 bucks for a 2. jar of pea soup.
 

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I don't think it's rude, and I appreciate your desire for homemade. You might try looking around your area for a Mennonite/Amish store, a food co-op, etc. to buy reasonable equivalents to home-canned foods at a doable price. I agree with folks posting that they made just about what they will need for the year, since the whole task is so time-consuming. Folks around here sell jams, jellies, pickled stuff & grape filling at their stands & markets. Also that packing & shipping to guarantee safe delivery is another demanding task. // Do you have a freezer?? If not, it could be worth getting a small, efficient one, and start buying produce in season at farm markets. There are quite a few things you can just rinse and freeze, including tomatoes, peppers, zukes, summer squash, eggplant. If you want to use less freezer space, you can cut tomatoes in half and gently squeeze out seeds & fluid, ditto peppers into halves or quarters, grate the squashes. Other things require a brief blanching, which is basically a 3-4 minute dip in boiling water. Even this time of year (upstate NY), some things are still available at public markets or farms, like winter squash, pumpkins, apples, quinces, potatoes. If you have cool, dark storage, those will keep some weeks or months yet before spoiling. An old-fashioned "keeper" apple will last into next spring. Sue
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What is zzccdd?

I guess understand the liability concern, I'm just a little surprised to hear it coming from folks on here. I have purchased canned items from Amish families and liability was never an issue.

I know that people treasure their canned items but I thought that some people may have an abundance of items and would be willing to sell leftovers.
 

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Dallas
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There's a big liability issue, not to mention its illegal to sell prepared food out of a non-licensed kitchen.
Find yourself a farmers market and canning supplies if you can't grow your own food.
 

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Stating the price and not being willing to compensate someone for their time and expenses in shipping to you probably didn't help. I sold half pint jars of jam for $4 three years ago. The going rate here is $4.50 per half pint now. It takes time to get the boxes and bubble wrap needed for shipping, more time to do the packing, more time to go to the post office or UPS building to ship the box, and gas to get there.
 

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It's a lot of work to process the food. I put up enough for my family, and all the extra gets taken to work in the "unprocessed" stage and given to whoever wants it. Or it gets fed to the livestock in the raw form. I don't think many people put up more than they expect to need as there are much easier ways to get rid of any excess produce.

This year I got apricots, pears and cucumbers from folks with "extra" and I processed that myself. I brought in apples, tomatoes and squash, and if someone else wanted to can it up that didn't bother me a bit.

I'm also watching for deals on produce at the store, just bought 20 lbs of potatoes real cheap and I'll be canning that up. Sure is nice to open a jar of pealed potatoes and only have to heat them up to be ready to eat. My potato patch got drowned out, so I didn't have any of my own.

Cathy
 
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