seeking the perfect HOE!!

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by mpillow, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have 3 hoe heads, a gravel rake head, a snapped pitchfork.... My husband has had it with me! I'm not a very big person mind you but I'm a tool-breaker. I like to tell my husband more things would break for him if he only used them. :eek:

    Can handles be made to hold my hoes, rakes pitchforks and shovels? I did have a nice old hoe about 30yo we found at our cabin up North that lasted 7 years but I broke it last Fall. :waa: It was/is my favorite smaller and more balanced than newer ones.
     
  2. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    Handles can be made to fit nearly every hand tool.

    Wood (naturally) is the most commonly found. Fiberglass handles are rugged, but not "destruction-proof".
    Fiskars makes tools with steel handles.

    If you or your husband is handy with a welder (or know someone who is), a steel handle can be fabricated from pipe fairly easily.
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Tru value hardware has a hoe that takes replacement handles it has a large eye for the handle to fit in just like a pick or mattaxe has .
     
  4. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The older favorite hoe has hollow where the handle goes into the the tool which is more easily replaced. The other hoe is like 1/2" square that goes into handle. I like the welded handle idea but not sure hubby will go for it. When the old one gets its new handle of wood we are going to put a skinny bolt thru metal receiver and wood and see if it helps. We have a new fiberglass pitchfork from Sears that I absolutely hate but the wooden one snapped and thats what the store replaced it with.

    My dad loaned me his tined hoe and I am in love with it....he may never see that baby again. I mucked out an 8*8 goat barn with 2 ft of poo and hay really easy. Way more productive than the pitchfork and lighter with longer handle so you can swing and sink it to grab the packed hay. Did I mention that he loaned it to me 1&1/2 years ago? :eek: I hide it when I know hes coming to visit!

    I'll give it back when I can afford a tractor! :D

    Thanks for the ideas!
     
  5. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    I have old privit hedges that have grown into near trees. I find privit wood is generally streight and oddly of uniform diamiter the whole elngth of the trunks. the wood pf the privir is dense, super hard and makes excelent handles.

    get a good fire going, set your broken toys on the coals and burnnout the wood. find a nice privit hedge and pick a handle. oak saplings and other treess make good handle wood.
    hickory.... elm ect.

    or, Ya can just go to AGWAY and pay top buck for a good hoe, and they have lifetime warranty. Ive had them replace my grain shovel 3 times over the last few yrs, no cost.
    if your a tool breaker, the extra cash for the lifetime replacement warranty is worth your wile.
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You need an old fashioned grubbing hoe. They are heavy but they will take out small trees and never hurt the handle.
     
  7. tooltime

    tooltime Border Ruffian

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    I use what some old-timers call a tobacco hoe. It's a bit heavier blade on a straight wooden handle.

    A grubbing hoe I suspect might be the same thing as a forestry hoe. The hoe "blade" on these is almost a square. I have one that is 7" by 8". These hoes typically have a bit shorter handle.
     
  8. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    If you are breaking that many handles it is likely you, and not the handles which is the problem. Don't use them as levers. Each time you are through with a tool give the handle a good coating of something like linseed oil to try to keep it from drying out.

    Handles should never be burned out of tools. Ruins the temper (hardness) on the tool. This is especially true for cutting tools, such as axes.

    Ken S. in WC TN