Seed Ticks

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jynxt, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. jynxt

    jynxt Well-Known Member

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    We are having the worst time with those nasty little bloodsuckers. We just moved to an old farmhouse that had been empty for quite awhile. Now my children and us grown folks too are getting literally hundreds of those tiny ticks everyday.

    With all the illnesses that ticks carry this scares the snot out of me. What can I do to get rid of the ticks, or to keep them off of us? I'm not crazy about chemicals, but at this point I will try anything.

    Thanks in advance
    Jeannie
     
  2. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    You HAVE to use chemicals.

    Be mindful that, from what I understand, seed ticks are the ones which most likely transmit Lyme and other diseases. And, depending on the area you're in, they most likely carry a lot of other diseases, as well, including erhlichiosis, babesiosis, tularemia, Rocky Mountain Spotted fever, etc.

    First, mow religiously. Put all dogs and cats on frontline or, even better, K9 Advantix.

    I use a combination of Spectracide, tick granules, a product I get at the feed store for spraying and something by Bayer over tick season --- I start at the very beginning of the season and spray or sprinkle every couple of weeks.

    Do perimeter sprays, as well. They really do work. If you begin this early in the season, by this time of year, you can go a month w/o spraying or otherwise treating.

    Every time you go outside, the minute you come in, you need to strip naked :eek: :D , through your clothes in the washer and wash them in HOT water, then get in the shower. IMMEDIATELY.

    My place was infested when I moved in. It's no longer infested. But it took two years and the loss of my fave hound to erhlichiosis w/ babesiosis coinfection. :(

    Be mindful that, if you have dogs, ticks can still attach and transmit disease if you use Frontline. K9 Advantix, however, actually repels the ticks.

    Good luck. Ticks are very, very bad news. :no:
     

  3. bob

    bob New Member

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    My mother grew up in northeastern OK through the depression and she claims that Banty hens and Guinea Fowl will naturally eradicate these tiny beast.
     
  4. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Your mom is right.

    So, in addition to everything else, get some chickens and guineas.
     
  5. Timedess

    Timedess Guest

    I have a question about that. Would there ever be any dangers of one of the birds eating a poisoned insect, then the bird getting sick due to the poisoned insect it ate?

    I'd be more apt to get the guineas first, than to start out with chemicals, personally.

    in Him,
    Timedess
     
  6. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Timedess, there's chickens and guineas all over the place around here (just not on my land at the present moment! :rolleyes: ) and everyone here uses tick stuff --- I have yet to see any problems from it.

    I know dogs can have very big problems with herbicides --- not Round Up, but the other kinds people spray willy nilly to kill off dandelions and what not. I'm pretty sure they've established links between those kinds of herbicides and various bladder, etc. cancers.

    But so far, no probs with the pesticides.

    In some areas, too, you really have to weigh the risks of pesticides against the risks of tick disease. Tick disease where I am presents a very real danger, much more than pesticides.
     
  7. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    We used to have them extremely bad. One year you could step on the grass, step back on the porch and you had a patch of them crawling up your leg. We used that chemical crap for a couple years. After we got chickens we never had ticks in the yard again. They also clean them up in the field, they are wonderful. Haven't had to touch the chemicals since, and we have eggs. :D
     
  8. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The ticks have been bad this year, which is one reason I'm hoping for a very cold winter. We put Frontline on our dogs and this year used it plus flea/tick collars from the vet. Still were having ticks on our Border Collie so we had him clipped. He looked funny, but the short hair made it easier to see ticks that got on him and he didn't seem to be getting as many.

    By next Spring we will have guineas and chickens all over our yard (if I can keep the neighbor's dog from killing them) for tick and insect control. But I will continue to use Frontline on the dogs and cats.

    I have also always heard that the seed ticks were the worst for transmitting disease.
     
  9. SRSLADE

    SRSLADE Well-Known Member

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    Bob is right get chickens.
     
  10. jynxt

    jynxt Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all of your responses. We will be getting chickens, but most likely not until next spring. We have always used frontline on our pets and I have been faithful in using it with them here. I am afraid of the tickborne illnesses, but my dh is absolutely terrified of them. He had a very severe case of erliciosis (sp?) in his early twenties that nearly killed him, and left him having an extremely difficult time completing the simplest tasks for years after.

    I guess I'm off to the farm store tommorrow to see what kind of (yikes) chemicals we can get to kill the little nasties.
    Thanks
    Jeannie
     
  11. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I do not like to use any kind of chemicals, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do! I think that since you are waiting until Spring for the birds you may want to go on ahead and dose the yard right now and then make sure and get your birds in the earliest shipment you can get in the spring. If you can get some allready grown birds to fill in the gaps until your babies are big, even better. Guinneas are insectavores (SP?) and so are great for this purpose, Chickens and Ducks are omnivores (sp?) and will eat not only the bugs but seeds and grain as well. But it does take a couple of weeks in the Spring until they are able to get all the little beasties. One of the many reasons I love our birds!! When we first moved out here we did not have any birds and we where overun with ticks. Within two weeks of getting our ducks out here and buying some chickens we where tick free. Gotta love 'em!!
    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  12. East Texas Pine Rooter

    East Texas Pine Rooter Well-Known Member

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    I "was" a general building contractor. I built a house in the country, and the carpenters complained of the seed ticks. I went to the local feed store, and they recommended using sulfer powder. I spread it around the perimeter of the house, and the men put it on there pant legs, and boots, viola, no more problem. My dad who is 85, tells the story of taking a teaspoon full of sulfer in water every day, while in boot camp in Alexendria, Lousiana, while going through flight school during world war 2. They were keeping the ticks moskietoes at bay, and it worked. Only problem, when you sweat, you smell like sulfur.