Seed packet plant info ?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by horsegurl146, Jun 2, 2006.

  1. horsegurl146

    horsegurl146 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    When it says on the back of the seed packet "days to crop: 55 days" is that 55 days from when you plant the seed, when you transplant it, or after it germinates? Does it vary for different plants? Like for tomatoes (which are mostly transplanted) or for carrots (which usually aren't)?

    Thanks!
     
  2. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,187
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2002
    Location:
    Australia
    X days to crop means just that. X days from planting the seeds. In theory, in optimal conditions. According to statistics gained from years of observation and averaging things out. Consider it a bit like calculating the expected date of delivery of your child. How many babies actually arrive on the due date, huh?
     

  3. MaineFarmMom

    MaineFarmMom Columnist, Feature Writer

    Messages:
    4,568
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Location:
    Maine
    It varies. For some things it's from the day of direct seeding (brassicas, for example) and other things it's from transplanting (tomatoes, melons, artichokes). When you transplant things like broccoli you subtract 20 days from the number of days it would take to reach maturity from direct seeding.
     
  4. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

    Messages:
    692
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    SW Missouri
    It means days to maturity. That means the day until it opens a flower and has nothing to do with harvest.
     
  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    That is totally incorrect! If one waited for many vegetables to produce a flower, one would wait a full year or more after planting!

    Days to crop, for many garden vegetables, are counted from emergence of the plant/seedling. For tomatoes, peppers, and brassica which are normally set out as 4 to 6 week old plants, it's from the transplant time.

    Martin
     
  6. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

    Messages:
    827
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Location:
    NW Iowa
    There are other factors to be considered also, so the time on pkt., although I am sure technicaly correct if growing conditions were ideal, but they seldom are. Soil temp, weather, adequate rainfall/moisture or lack of, sunny days vs. cloudy days, even wind can have an effect since it effects the moisture level of the soil. All can contribute to quite a variation in the time it takes any given crop. Just something to keep in mind. Deb :cool:
     
  7. Thoughthound

    Thoughthound Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    280
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Location:
    Iowa
    The numbers are a guideline of earliness vs. lateness because your plants can't be grown under the scientific conditions where they are tested.

    A 55 day plant may produce in 55 days when planted on May 20. If you wanted to harvest a week earlier, you might have to plant 3 weeks earlier due to light and temperature conditions.

    There are so many variables involved that it is impossible to accurately predict without years of experience with a vegetable, a specific cultivar, and in your specific environment.

    Use the numbers as a guideline of comparison. When in doubt, succession plant every two weeks during specific growing periods.

    If you have too much, give it to an elderly care center, the VA, a food bank, a horse farm or compost pile.
     
  8. horsegurl146

    horsegurl146 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    Thanks for the info. everyone! I guess I'll stop examining my radishes/peas/cabbages 3 times a day wondering when they'll be big enough to eat because they're all at least 15 days late! :rolleyes: