See if you know this fungus?

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by moonwolf, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,576
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    This is actually a parasite of a mushroom.
    The red crust on the outside is the stromatic sterile tissue of the ascomycete, and the white flest on the inside is the flesh of a basidiomycete mushroom, presumably Russula or Lactarius species. It's almost like mycological cannabilism: "fungi eating other fungi".
    This edible fungus has been eaten for hundreds of years with a very slim chance of any problems, unless a known poisionous species might be the one being parasitized by the ascomycete portion of the complex.
    This mushroom 'complex' has a red to red orange shell and a white inside. It can grow quite large, typically the size of a mans hand and shaped often to resemble a funnel. The original gilled basidiomycete that is parasitized underneath the ascomycete lives little resemblence to it's original form, thus the surface is smooth to slightly ridged on the underside and a rough texture to the surface. It can be abundant through summer into fall and often on in association with leaf litter and a partial conifer canopy. Can be found in mixed decidous and evergreen older growth forests.
    A hint for cooking is that it is excellent with garlic and seafood, and has a texture similar to some of the shelled seafoods.

    Can you guess the name of this fungus?
     
  2. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

    Messages:
    15,607
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Between Crosslake and Emily Minnesota
    I dunno the name of the fungus, but it seems to me that you are describing one of our favorite mushrooms....the Lobster mushroom.
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,576
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Canada

    Yes, indeed. Congratulations!

    I found some nice fresh ones today.

    Hypomyces Lactifluorum or commonly called Lobster Mushroom:

    http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/aug2001.html