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So what is it with scrapeing the hair off? Is the hair shaved off right at the skin or is it kind of pulled out from the volicles? If it is just shaved off right at the skin then wouldn't it be faster to burn it off?

When I was a kid my Aunts and Uncles always scraped it off but I guess I really didn't pay any attention of just what the skin looked like after they were done with it. The last pig I raised myself and processed myself I skinned it. But this next pig that I'm raising I'm wanting to have a pig roast with it, so I want to leave the skin on and want it to look apetizing when it's done cooking.

So which way would be the best way to do it? Scrape or burn?
 

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Scraping pulls the hair out if it was scalded properly. Sometimes in some of the nooks and crannies the scald isn't good enough. That's where a really sharp knife can shave the hair off. You haven't lived until you've chewed on a cracklin with a three day beard. That's when it was nice to have Old Shep standing by. He loved them already warmed up!
He'll look better if you scrap him.
 
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Well that's what I was thinking "Unc". The reason behind the scraping was to pull the hair out. Otherwise we could apply shaving cream to the pig and use our straight razors. I have a bell scraper that I use to dehair deer hides so I think I will try it since it is suppose to be made to dehair hogs.
 

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Unk's right R.H.. They look better scraped too. The last hog I posted a picture of was torched and scraped. The skin held the moisture in while cooking which made the meat really juicy... But there was too much stubble to eat it.
Did you get one cooked this weekend?
 
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Cowgirl I just didn't have time to mess with a pig this last weekend. So now I'm shooten for 4th of July holiday. My pig will be a little more corn fed and should be a very good size by then also. Right now she only goes around 60 pounds or so. Hopefully she will be closer to a 100 pounder by then.
 

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My friend sells pigs to the Hmong on a regular basis. They scrape AND burn. They wet the hog good, and then burn the hair off with a propane blow torch. They alternate burning and scraping. Comes out slick as a whistle. They run a hose over the hog while they scrape.
 

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Folks,

We've covered this issue before. Look in the archives for even more info.

But in short, most people scrape to keep the hide on. Cracklings are good, but making a good ham with no skin is more difficult. My bride thinks the skin is the best part of the hog, too.

The killed hog is scalded with 160 F water to loosen the hair. Most folks add rosin or ashes to the scald water to scald faster. Helps a lot.

Skinning is OK, but you lose a lot of fat. Some folks simply nail the fat hide up on the barn for the birds. Others want as much fat as possible for lard or soap. You're doing the work and paying the bill so get what you want from the porker you're growing.

And don't forget to offer your thanks for the critters life!

bearkiller
 
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