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In Remembrance
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Discussion Starter #1
http://www.scottsliquidgold.com/mold-control-500/Default.aspx

Anybody ever try this? Does it work? How does it smell? Does the smell linger? I'm nervous about trying it because of sensitivities to chemicals, but the mold keeps coming back on walls and floors. I've been cleaning with vinegar and have air circulating.
 

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I used Liquid Gold many many years ago. Oil based, never really liked the smell of it.

As far as mold: why not use bleach? works better than vinegar.

Walls & floors? In the bathroom or where? Maybe something is leaking behind a wall? What kind of mold? If it's black, may be bad for your health.

Guess I'm asking for more information. :)
 

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I'm extremely allergic to chlorine so no bleach. It doesn't really solve the problem. We got flooded and it has been too wet for anybody to get under the house and take the wet insulation out. I've tried H2O2 and it isn't really helping either.
 

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I think you'll continue to have mold until the cause - wet insullation - is removed.
Can you put a fan (maybe up on some bricks) under the house to speed it's drying? I think that I'd try the formula that gccrooks site suggests. Sounds pretty nontoxic to me.

So sorry for you! ((((hugs))))
 

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Be EXTREMELY careful when cleaning any kind of mold - wear a face mask and avoid breathing in the spores. I spent 10 days in ICU last year due to a lung fungal infection from mold spores.....
 

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Master Of My Domain
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research mold and boric acid.
 

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Hey, Cyng, tea tree oil is antibacterial and antifungal. (I don't know how exactly that applies to mold?)

When it stops raining enough to let me cross your bridge, I'll crawl under there and help you tear it out. It is still supposed to be raining all this week and weekend. You call when it dries up enough!

I'm thinking about you!
 

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Thanks, Rhonda, you don't need to be under there any more than I do! LOL

I wonder if borax would work. I have some of that. Don't know if I can get out to try to find anything else right now anyhow.

I don't think I could stand the smell of tea tree oil all over my walls. I'll give the borax a shot.
 

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I would wear a mask in the presence of mold (fungus) spores, no matter what you would use to clean! Any kind of modification of the Ph would change the environment in which the mold spores would develop. Boric acid has been used for yeast infections succesfuly. I don't know how effective it would be for a surface that is impregnated with mold spores and not just... candida albicanis or mycosis.
"One possible alternative is the use of simple boron compounds such as boric acid, sodium tetraborate and other oxides of boron. Borates are among the oldest preservatives still in use. They display broad spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi, and wood boring insects. However, they have low mammalian toxicity, are non-corrosive, non-combustible and odourless.

Despite their favourable attributes, their use as wood preservatives is limited to dry timber applications because of their tendency to leach from wood products under wet conditions."
This is a cut and paste from this site: http://www.future.org.au/news_2005/may/green.html
 

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Master Of My Domain
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you would mix it with water to apply it and it will soak into the wood. hopefully the wood being treated is not in standing water or under a leaky roof and is only damp, so leaching should not be a problem.
 

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Where on your walls is the mold or mildew - I don't remember seeing any.
What if (someone?) went in and cleaned the places with the appropriate cleaning/"killing" agents, rinsed really well (or counter acted with vinegar or whatever) and you stayed out a few days.
When you moved back in, maybe it wouldn't bother you?

Just a thought.
 

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We used to have a house that had mold on the lower walls and some on the floor. We found out the floor of the crawlspace was lower than the backfill around the house, and that was retaining moisture -- and sometimes actual standing water after heavy rains. We installed a sump pump and ditched around the inner foundation blocks to the sump. We then covered everything with black 4-mil plastic.

Part of the problem in our house, too, was that it was a 1950s home built with no wall insulation at all. The cold air caused an almost imperceptable condensation of our humid indoor air on the lower walls, promoting mold. We chose to drill at the top of each wall from outside, and blow in insulation. We replaced the plugs we took out with construction adhesive.

All that worked great and fixed the problem. We scrubbed with bleach, and that was that.

So I would suggest you check if you are on a crawlspace to see if the dirt is moist or wet there. If it does not have standing water but is always wet or very moist, cover the whole area under there with plastic and seal the seams with duct tape. You can also install self-opening foundation vents, and even a small fan in a foundation vent to circulate air UNDER the house and draw in less humid air.

Check your worst exterior walls for insulation by just pulling off a few wall switch covers and seeing if there is any evident around the outside of the electrical box. If not, insulation will also help. Last, you can purchase a portable dehumidifier to dry your indoor air. They are very inexpensive to run, way cheaper than an a/c unit. Run it alone, or with your a/c.

Hope this helps. That house was tough to cure for us, but we were happy with the results.
 

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As someone who tests molds and fungi to see what they like to eat..

Certain molds love certain things..they don't all thrive in the same conditions.
That said, if you have plaster/wallboard/sheetrock material you will need to replace it if it becomes infested with mold as there are certain types that thrive by living on the paper/glue that the sheetrock is covered with.

same for wallpaper and certain latex paints.

I would hire a good cleaning crew to come in and thoroughly clean with a mold removal product - go stay with friends until the house airs out.

Otherwise you will be fighting a long hard battle. As others have stated, the first thing to do is stop the water, dry it up, etc. but you already know that. The second is treatment or repairs (tear out wallboard that is heavily soaked). If you do not, you will continue to battle the mold spores as most will live deep within tissues of wood, paper, glue, etc. and surface from time to time (where you can visually see them) when it is time to "fly off" to reproduce. Hard to explain but every few days, a new crop of mold will reproduce via spores, those spores are microscopic and can get into the a/c and heating systems of your house. If you think of a dandelion when it makes seed, then that is how some molds spread their spores..just need a gentle puff of wind as one walks by..and poof..lots of new little mold spores looking for a place to call home. Other molds are what I call the slimes..they don't send spores "out" but rather reproduce and add to the present colony so the area gets bigger and bigger.

Sounds dreary I know, but "SOME" people are allergic to mold spores and only a few spores will make life miserable for them, others like myself, well I deal with them daily and have never been sick but I do mask and glove before handling in a lab environment. For those allergic, hire professionals and move out for a few days.

Unless I know what you are dealing with, I cannot be of more help other than in a general manner. To say it is "black" mold, is not enough..as there are several hundreds of "black molds", but to say it is aspergillious niger..then I can help more. Where is this mold located? what type of "wall" are you dealing with?

Bleach will work temporarily..it will kill mold that it comes into contact with, but will not be long acting..if one imagines a wall in "layers", the bleach is in contact with the external layer and maybe a few centimeters into the inner layers..mold I can almost bet will be found all the way through the wall to the backsides and will continue to come up. BTW - it is a myth that mold spores are GONE once a place dries out..what happens is that they go dormant..when wetness reoccurs..they "come back" to life..as before..

I know this as I rehydrate mold spores every 14 days for testing..I get pellets of compressed, dried spores..add water, apply to agar and poof..in 14 days I have beautiful mold colonies..ready for harvest.

who says farmers can't be found everywhere..l
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I went around and cut the plastic under the house around the edge and as far back as I could reach. Then used the rake to drag out wet insulation till my back was hurting too bad to do more. Maybe can get some more out tomorrow. At least some of what is left will drain out better. I think I will cut the wallboard out that is the worst. I can't really get to the stuff in the mid section under the house.

Rhonda, I had just cleaned all the walls before you came. It is coming back everywhere I cleaned and then some. The humidity has been in the 80s and 90s, it was 99% this morning. I have pools of water under the house still from all the rain.

I am NOT putting new fiberglass batt insulation under the house when I replace it. That is just a recipe for trouble if you ask me!
 

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Master Of My Domain
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about the bleach...i read that while highly efective at killing mold, the size of the molecules of bleach do not allow it to penetrate very far into wood. when people use a bleach and water solution to kill mold on wood, the water may actually do more damage as it will penetrate the wood and actually feed the mold by allowing it to have moisture when it may have been better to just leave it alone. that is why any solution containing water needs to be a solution that contains a chemical that will penetrate as far as the water will.
 

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Cyngbaeld:

when you get everything cleaned/cleared up, there's a do it yourself spray on foam you can use to insulate under the house. Wish I could find the site for you - maybe someone else remembers, it was on a thread about 6 months ago.

It comes in containers like propane tanks & the foam is like the stuff in the canisters one uses for sealing cracks.

Sounds like it would be perfect for your situation - waterproof, bug proof, etc.

Sounds like you have a job on your hands. I wish you well.
 
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