Scottish Highland and Belted Galloway -anyone milk these?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Ark, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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  2. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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    A Highland would produce planty of milk but they are not by nature milk cows. I would get kicked out of the milking shed if I tried it with mine. :)
     

  3. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well......I'm sure either breed could give you a decent amount of milk. My big thing would be how tame is "tame"?? :) I'd be wanting to find out *if* I could milk them before bringing them home.
     
  4. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    In the recent years I only have goat milking experience, and plenty of it!
    I did plenty of cow milking in my teen years, but I wasnt the one who got them used to the idea!
    How hard is it to train a cow to stand still to be milked compared to a goat? I've trained some first fresheners and it wasnt so bad - but that is probably because they were SO tame and were willing to let me do anything.
    I just REALLY want cow milk for the cream. The pigs could have what was left. I want to make butter and ice cream, and cheese sometimes. We make ALL SORTS of stuff with our goat milk and we love it, but obviously the cream doesnt rise much.
    I have had 2 different cream separators and didnt really think they were all that great so I sold them. I dont want another one. I just want a cow!! LOL
    The other day dh was saying, "Well, we have pigs, chickens, goats, a horse, dogs, cats, guineas, etc, etc... the only thing missing is a cow!" So, I said - "OK - let's get one!" And he rolled his eyes at me. IT was a joke. :Bawling:
    Well, he might eventually come to like the idea. :p
     
  5. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Its pretty much the same thing......but a cow is SO much bigger and if they are not tame.......They can pack a wallop!! A goat is an absolute love pat in comparison....I know. :) A cow who is used to having her legs and udder worked with may still sometimes kick, but its usually just protesting something and not *real* sincere. A cow who is no used to such handling can be downright wicked with her feet. Then again, depending on the cow, she might take it like a lamb.
    Again, I would want to try and milk these cows *before* buying.....but thats just me. :)
     
  6. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Emily!
     
  7. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    off topic a bit what are the highlanders worth?? i passed on 2 at the auction the other day.
     
  8. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    I milk a highland and have for years , they are no more prone to kick than any other breed of cattle , each one is an individual . if you start with a young heifer and work with her frequently , especially brushing her udder area she will be used to you handling her teats... take it from there when she freshens .. some like it some wont tolerate it or at least will give you grief .. just like any other . yes I find it is worthwhile to milk a highland , i dont need the gobs of milk as would be produced by the dairy breeds (I used to keep a jersey when the kids were young .. ) now i just prefer to have the cream .. and most beef breeds produce high butterfat percentages.. add to that that highlands can be very milky .. they were/ are a dual purpose animal .. in the states thats being bred out of them .. its also why on very old cows (15 and older ) and old genetics the cows are very angular. those are the bloodlines that reflect the fact that highlands were also kept as a milch cow .

    On the price of a highland .. well at the sale barn you are going to get/give sale barn prices .. added to the fact the price will reflect the horns and long hair .. most feedlot folks frown on horns and long hair is equated to unhealthy animals (ie internal parasites so they might even go a little cheaper .. its one reason I market not, at the sale barn .. If I have no room in the freezer for a cull animal thats the only time she/ he will be sent to the sale .. and there is a reason I am culling .. so be leary of that avenue of purchasing a highland
    temprement is my main reason of sending a good brood cow to salebarn (unless she is truely evil .. then I will find room in the freezer and be glad to eat her !!! )
    from a breeder, prices are all over the wall depending on teh bloodlines , you can find very good registered heifer and bull calves for as little as 500 dollars .. adn as much as 5000 or more .. it varies like any breed .. if it isnt registerd i would pay more than going rate per lb in your area .. if however you plan to milk .. then she will need to be bred and like any purebred her calves of coarse will have more value .. if you keep up the registry ....

    Paula Hyde
    Hyde Park Farm
     
  9. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    It was more an exotic/ small animal auction, people it seemed had them with out bothering to get them bred(mother daughter pair) they were registered and were quite docile, kept as pets i guess. just a fluke they were there. they did go for $500 a piece. i was just curious as we do like them and they looked in good health ect.
     
  10. arcticow

    arcticow Well-Known Member

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    I am milking a 4-year old Highland now. Very tough to handle-takes a bucket of feed in a tub in the middle of the lot. Seriously, they are all individuals. Take your time, give them time to understand what you want, & there is usually no problem. Like Jerseys or Ayrshires, you just gotta 'slpain what it is you want.They are smarter than most of the folks who can't handle them.
     
  11. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    I am training this year's Highland heifer to be our milk cow in three years. Halter breaking her now, getting her used to handling and grooming. At just shy of 5 months old its not easy to see what her ultimate dispostion will be like. She is my cow's fourth calf and second heifer. I sold last year's heifer for $1450 and turned down a $1600 offer for this years. When I butcher the steers I am able to sell the 3/4 I don't need for $5/lb plus c&w and slaughter fee. So, IMHO, it pays to buy registered breeding stock.
     
  12. JAM

    JAM Well-Known Member

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    I have a three year old S/H bull that is getting to dangerous to keep. He attacks the tractors and any other piece o machinery that comes into his field. He knocked my son out of the bulldozer yesterday, tossed him in the air, stomped on him, then walked away. Needless to say my son sports some beautiful bruises and a fraction of an inch closer on his thigh he would be a soprano. I think its time Angus heads for the freezer but have been told by an old farmeer that the meat will be no good since he was never castrated. Is this true?
     
  13. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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    We had a bull butchered a couple of years ago and he tasted fine. A little stronger beef taste but that's all. :)
     
  14. Ralph in N.E.Oh

    Ralph in N.E.Oh Humble Shepherd

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    Jam, Put that bull in a close pen 8x8 feet where he can't get at anybody. Put him on cracked, rolled or even whole corn for 90 days. Give him enough hay to keep his rumen working and all the fresh water he wants. Then butcher him. Do it yourself if you can if not take him to the slaughterhouse, but call ahead so he can be confined there, otherwise he'll spend the night mixed with all the cattle doing bull things... he'll get his adrenelin rush and be tougher than shoe leather. After knocking your son down and just being a bother, I'd smile every time I took a bite of him... My advice, get him penned and do not trust him for a second!
     
  15. JAM

    JAM Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. Angus is in a small field with a four year old heifer that I was hoping he would breed but I think he is gay. He runs the other way every time she comes in heat. Maybe he is lacking those male hormones. He must weigh close to 1500lbs.
     
  16. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    Jam, I am so sorry about your son getting hurt!! Thank goodness it wasnt any worse.
     
  17. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I want a milk cow too.... :p and DH just rolls his eyes...

    Can you get a bottle heifer to start with on goats milk? I've done a couple of bull/steer calves on our goat milk w/ good results. They were/are very tame.
     
  18. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    JAM - Without a moment's Hesitation, I would load that Bull into a stock Trailer....and leave him locked down there until the next weekly livestock market would accept him. You can put water and hay into trailer by pouring it through the slats until he is dispensed with. The Bull's value as freezer beef is not worth the risk, given the event that has allready occurred with your son.
    Plan B would be to take a HIGH Caliber Rifle and DROP HIM where he stands.

    Ask Yourself this: Are You prepared to attend your son's funeral? Or would you have him attend Your's?
     
  19. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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  20. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    Well, I really need a smaller breed cow because we dont have a lot of grass. And if I could get a calf then I would have the problem of getting her bred when she was old enough... But, otherwise, I like that idea because we could be SURE she was really tame and used to being handled.

    Thanks for the input everyone! Glad to hear some of yall are milking these kinds of cows. :p