Scarlet runner trelis ideas

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ross, Feb 1, 2005.

  1. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    13,084
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ontario
    What can I use for scarlet runners to climb on to? I'm thinking of planting 200-300 feet of them using cedar pickets and round baler net wrap (looks like plastic bird screen)
     
  2. Lilandra

    Lilandra talk little, listen much

    Messages:
    1,696
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2004
    Location:
    IOWA

    I'm going to plant them on a garden arbor to create a path through a flower bed in the front yard.

    I hope other's share their ideas -- this is my first year planning on using them instead of other bean varieties.
     

  3. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

    Messages:
    7,380
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2003
    Location:
    east ont canada
    you will not be sorry for planting them !!great looking with the red flowers.very prolific with great tasting fruit. we have grown them on a 6 foot chain link fence around"grampas" garden.now we want to grow them in our own gardens. an arbour sounds nice but they will be hard to pick with out a step ladder. would love an arbour covered in morning glories coming in our front yard but still have not built the arbour!
     
  4. becky4050

    becky4050 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    Location:
    California
    I haven't used it for runner beans but other climbing things in my garden have been successfully raised using old cattle panels held up by metal fence posts - 2 at each end and slide the panel between them. If your fence posts are tall enough you can raise the panel up a foot or so, tying it to the fence and just use sticks stuck in the ground to get the vines up to the fence. I like this because it is easy to move next year. A friend of mine has sometimes made a "sandwich" of the cattle panels, planting the vines in between.

    One year when the kids were small we did the "tepee" thing with runner beans, using long tomato stakes (are they 1X2s?) and then winding twine back and forth. Leave an opening on one side so they (the kids) can get inside. The kids loved it but it was kind of a pain to get all that twine off in the fall. Probably plastic snow fence or something like that would be easier.

    Have you ever tried planting hyacinth beans? They AREN'T edible but the flowers are an incredible pink and the bean pods are deep purple - truly a spectacular sight although they need a heavy duty support. They grew so thick and heavy that they collapsed a cheap tubular arbor I had them growing on. The dried seeds are very unusual, too. Definitely worth growing if you have a showy spot.
     
  5. Lilandra

    Lilandra talk little, listen much

    Messages:
    1,696
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2004
    Location:
    IOWA

    that was one of my worries about them - I wasn't sure they'd cover the arbor...
    we don't eat that many beans around here so if there were some that spoiled on the vine that wouldn't be a great loss... the chickens would get the vines in the fall so they wouldn't be totally wasted and maybe would work out good for them to have a bit of a surprize treat.

    what else can you use these beans for other than freezing for casseroles and side dishes?
     
  6. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    561
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    Location:
    ontario
    what else can you use these beans for other than freezing for casseroles and side dishes?[/QUOTE]

    They are as good as bush beans if picked when very young.
     
  7. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

    Messages:
    11,076
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Kansas
    Ross, which size of round bales do you use? I was wondering which width/height of netting a person should use?

    Will you need to run a taut wire along the top to keep the netting from sagging?

    I suppose you would plant, then place the netting, correct? I can't imagine that you would put up the netting and try to plant close enough for the plants to find it and climb on.
     
  8. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

    Messages:
    7,380
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2003
    Location:
    east ont canada
    why do you call hyacinth beans inedible? when i googled it they talk about an herbal remidy that has no know toxisity.we have had scarlets as a stir fried ,boiled bean any where you use a bush bean. eaten green they are tasty! but the methane could run a car!! hey ,new energy source!! chickens like the over ripe or wilted beans and sheep love the greenery.
     
  9. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    13,084
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ontario
    Windy it is 4 foot net (NH Fasnet) I was thinking of nailing a board between the posts and tying it up . Yes I'd plant first, build the trelis second. I was thinking today maybe I should use some old sheep electronet we have and charge it for deer protection. ( Nasty stuff to fence sheep with!) Deer might get put off the idea on the first mouthful!