Scalding v Skinning: A Personal Comparison

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Tango, Oct 20, 2004.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    We spoke of Ol Bauldy last week so I wanted to offer this comparison. I had the chance (nay the necessity) to butcher two pigs today - alone again- and without the energy to scald. I decided to try my hand at skinning alone. Two 60 pound pigs- two hours. :) No prep time needed other than getting the darned blade into the saw :no: (okay prep time 15 minutes for that)

    I used the electric saw to sever the heads and feet. Gutted them. Then skinned them. The first one was more time-consuming. It was laid flat on the table. The second one, I hung and skinned in strips- much easier and quicker. I cut them into large pieces (hams, picnics, ribs, tenderloins) and packaged. Not bad methinks. Still not thrilled about all those little hairs that cling to the meat. These pigs are very hairy :rolleyes: but in an emergency it is a viable and worthwhile time saver. And the gators get some tasty treats as well :)
     
  2. tobo6

    tobo6 Well-Known Member

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    I admire you!! :worship: I've watched hundreds of butcherings, but just recently butchered two turkeys myself. I skinned instead of plucking for the first time too. Now, we've had 2 pigs and had the butcher come out both times to butcher for us. Watching him, it looks super easy. One of these days dh will try a pig himself I'm sure. I just really like someone else to cut up my meat on the pigs because they know what they are cutting for, lol.

    Deb
     

  3. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Deb, you'll get the hang of it- I know you will. Three years ago I might have shot my own foot :rolleyes: But to be honest I am not a good cutter. I recognize cuts but don't know how to get to them. Notice I didn't say pork chops in my post? LOL :) I had two teeny tiny pork chops for lunch today. I didn't dare do anything other than the big stuff. First chops we did last year, I called bone chops :eek: Live and learn :)
     
  4. vtfarma

    vtfarma Well-Known Member

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    We just skinned our first pig Monday. She would not fit in the tub we scald in so we hung her and skinned her like a cow. It is how we will do the rest of them in the future. People have been saying for years around here that skinning is so easy we thought they were full of it... ah well live and learn.

    Tango, it certainly takes gumption to do 2 pigs alone. Julie dressed (skinned) at 342. It took 3 of us.

    Laurie
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    That was a huge pig. Mine were small. Mostly it just took an angry self in the morning once I saw that the pigs had gotten out again :no: Since the last hurricane, they've been tearing up the place and I was real tired in a very big way. Once these pigs start understanding there is a way to get out, oh boy :rolleyes:
     
  6. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    I've always skinned in strips too. I use a pair of vicegrip pliers that are made for welding clamping. It makes it way easy to hold on the strips as you peel them off.

    You can solve the hair issue with a small torch. Just burn them off.
     
  7. Tango, not sure just how you go about scraping your pig. Whether you dip the whole pig at once or do as we do. We warm up a 55 gallon drum barrel full of water and instead of dipping the pig in it we just dip out a pan full of water and pour it over the immediate area that we are going to scrape on the hog. It seems a lot easier to me. As your pouring the hot water over the intended area to be scraped you will see the skin draw up. When the skin draws up (kind of like using a heat gun on plastic film) it is ready to scrape. Pour, scrape,pour, scrape, pour, scrape until you have the whole pig finished. This method one person can easily do any size of pig. Well maybe. A 500-600 pound pig would be kind of hard to turn over if your by yourself.
     
  8. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    My bro in laws father told us to get some towels and soak them in hot water, lay them on the pig and scrape after, saves on water, when you don't have a great well. We're going to try it this weekend and will let you know how it turns out. The size of these guys negates the use of a barrel.
    Tango, I don't know how on earth you could do these guys alone, I butchered three big toms (20lbs dressed, not that big) I definately need help!
     
  9. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    sounds about right or maybe a little faster than me. that's the nice thing about smaller pigs, you dont need extra people around if they aren't able to or willing to help. What parts did you toss as an offering to the gators?
     
  10. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    you do tend to get different cuts, from different sized animals. I usually save the 2 whole front legs for stewing, (easier to cube the meat after it has been cooked off the bone), each hind leg as a roast, everything else that is easy to take off the bone goes into sausage, and the entire rest of the skeleton is cooked down into stock, (oh the head and feet I give to the dog)


     
  11. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Gators got it all -the heads, feet, skin, and guts. My bulldog got many prime tasty morsels beside me as I worked but he can't eat cooked pork I don't save anything for him or the others.
     
  12. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Thank r.h. I sue Old Baldy Hog Scald and I've done two pigs on my own with that. It is more time consuming because I clean the head, ears, feet, etc. i just didn't have the time or energy yesterday so I tried skinning. It was very easy on my back. With Old Baldy the pig has to be dipped- pouring doesnt' work.
     
  13. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I did three heritage turkeys by myself on Monday :) comes with the teritory around my house. I'm usually the only one here and things don't get done, unless I do them.
     
  14. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    now that's a thought, anyone ever tried a heat gun? seems analagous to the fire method common in Romania


     
  15. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    We skinned our first pig just a couple of weeks ago. I would never think of scalding!! It was really easy. My husband and I skinned him out in about 25 minutes and he dressed at 275. As far as skinning in strips, that is a big waste of time. We had read in all the books to do it that way but it is really time consuming and you waste a lot of meat that way. We tried that first then quickly switched to skinning him out in one big piece. It was very easy. This was our first pig so I'm hoping skinning goes much faster next time. Also, if you skin one big piece, NO HAIR on the meat :haha: Getting started takes the longest time then we just went right thru it. Once you have enough to hold in your left hand just keep it pulled tight and cut the tissue attached to the skin. It makes a very clean carcass too. No patches missing or uneven.
     
  16. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    It will be different for every person and every set up. For me, skinning in one piece was a chore and my hands hurt. There was more hair on the meat that way as well- again- for me. I don't see how any meat can be lost with either method though. I've done two scalded and two skinned by myself in the past 2 weeks, and have done a lot of scalded and a few skinned with help. Given the additional time to clean every little part of the pig, I prefer to scald.
     
  17. Epona

    Epona Member

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    Hmm just wondering what some of you do with your skins other than feed them to the gators??
     
  18. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    UPS just brought my box of "Ol Bauldy", can't wait to try it! :D
    I am planning on cleaning at least two this week. If time allows.

    Tango, do your wild hogs have more hair than domestic ones? Do they have more hair year round?
    Our hogs are putting on their winter coats and I just wondered how they would compare to the wild ones.

    Epona, good question! We don't use our skins unless we clean and cook them. Now deer hides are a different story. :)
     
  19. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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  20. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tips Tango!
    Looks like I might not get to the hogs til next week. Too much going on right now.