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While I've never calculated the savings associated with line-drying and washing/drying dishes by-hand, reality tells me there are savings to be had in both categories.

I grew up in a home with no automatic dishwasher, so remember helping my mom wash and dry dishes all the time, and the same went for clothesline drying, we had a line, and we used it all the time.

Personally I love washing/drying dishes by-hand, and while we do actually have an automatic dishwasher, I rarely use it, in fact, I can't honestly remember the last I ran a load of dishes through my dishwasher. Been a good 2-3 years (anyhow).

As for line-drying, I line-dry from spring until fall (faithfully). Love the nostalgic look of clothes on a line!

Additionally, I find hand-washing and drying dishes (by-hand) to be relaxing and almost meditative.
 

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Got to love the good old-fashioned method of washing and drying dishes by-hand, which for the record, seldom takes me any longer than about 20-30 minutes, and on days where pots and pans are absent, I can complete a typical full kitchen cleanup in 10-15 minutes. That's dishes washed, dried, and put away, with counters and stovetop clean.
 

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My grandmother had a disdain for dishwashers. She used to say if you just wash what you used you'd always have an empty sink and a full cupboard. She also believed letting dirty dishes sit in the dishwasher waiting to fill up was like pooping in the toilet and flushing once a week.
 

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My grandmother had a disdain for dishwashers. She used to say if you just wash what you used you'd always have an empty sink and a full cupboard. She also believed letting dirty dishes sit in the dishwasher waiting to fill up was like pooping in the toilet and flushing once a week.
Your grandmother and I would have gotten along very well. :)
 

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I hand wash my dishes. I usually wash as I cook. I use my dishwasher when I have a lot of company or when I wash the dishes in my cabinet and shelves in the dining room that I only use occasionally. I also have a lot of tea sets on display. When all my grandchildren have the room I will give them the ones they have chosen. Until then, we enjoy having tea.
 

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cfuhrer and I are kindred, I hate dishes. I typically use the same bowl and glass for days if I can, rinsing and putting it back on the counter for my own use.

I grew up in a home that used both a dryer and the clothesline. I love the smell of dryer clothes and the warmth of them when it's cold. With pets, I also love the fact dryers help subtract animal hair. I do appreciate clothes racks and would likely use them more if my cats didn't sharpen their claws on my grandmother's rack. So now and again I'll throw an article of clothing I don't want in the dryer over a chair or something temporary.

Good original question though! My husband and I probably do dishes once a week and wash clothing even less than that so I don't think our savings would be extravagant but certainly every little bit helps.
 

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Washing dishes....

My wife and I have this conversation once in a while. Usually it’s after watching a home improvement or real estate show. We are always amazed when the people make such a big deal of the dishwasher - or the lack of one - e gads!

We’ve been married for some 25 years now and have never had one. When I ask her if she ever had one before we met she said no. Neither of us would know how to operate one if we had it.

We are both in the belief in washing dishes and pot/pans as we go. It only takes a few seconds each time. I just can’t see doing it any other way.
 

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I use a wringer washer so I can control how long the laundry washes, never owned a dryer, I hang outside until the temps hit about 0*then hang in the house. I've never owned a dish washer.
 

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I use a wringer washer so I can control how long the laundry washes, never owned a dryer, I hang outside until the temps hit about 0*then hang in the house. I've never owned a dish washer.
What I'd give to wash a load of laundry again using a good old-fashioned wringer washing machine!

Growing up in a home with baby siblings, not only did I help and pitch-in with the changing of their diapers, I used to help my mom wash their diapers, too, using a wringer washing machine. Occasionally a pair of rubber pants would find their way through the rollers (accidentally), and boy did they ever let out a loud bang! They'd pop just like a balloon!
 

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Was just giving thought to the diaper days in our house (my own children, 1983 to 1996), and how nice it was to pin those diapers up on the outdoor clothesline to dry. No additional heat coming from the electric tumble dryer on a hot summer day adding to the discomfort in the home, no listening to the steady hum of the motor of the electric tumble dryer, and line-drying the diapers meant no additional wear-and-tear on the fabric. Diapers lasted longer.

Also, with those old-fashioned cloth diapers came old-fashioned rubber pants, and being vinyl-plastic, having an outdoor clothesline to pin up those rubber pants to air and dry was a must! I remember cycling between two pairs of rubber pants throughout the day... with one pair on baby's bottom, and the other pair airing on the outdoor line between changes.

I tell people, when you remove the lint-filter after drying a load of laundry and it's full of fluff, that's the fibers from all of the clothing and items being dried in the tumbler, whereas line drying preserves the fabric longer. WAY less wear-and-tear on things when line-dried the old-fashioned way.
 

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I washed dishes by hand for over 25 years in hard lime laden water and always detested ever minute of it. I enjoy and find great satisfaction in cooking, but all the messy dishes and pots and pans ruined the joy from cooking. So when we built the new house I requested a water softner be installed and that was the greatest thing ever ! No need to routinely scrub sinks, tubs, shower stalls and their glass doors, the soft water left no water and soap residue anywhere. Only need a quarter of the detergent, shampoo, and soap to still get everything spotlessly clean and laundry soft and fluffy without fabric softner. So the water softner has paid for itself in conserved cleaning products in the first year of use. I go through one 40 pound bag of softner salt a month, purchased at Aldi for under $5 dollars.

Had to go look up the amount of water used by my top of the line, super duper efficient, and whisper quiet Bosch dishwasher: less than 7 gallons used for the Auto cycle for a full load of dishes and pots and pans. Auto cycle takes 2 hours and 15 minutes. The Speed 60 cycle only takes less than 5 gallons used, and gets the full load washed and dried in an hour. So it's more efficient to use the Speed 60 cycle, which really surprised me !

Where we live electricity is supplied by a Co-op and is very moderately priced, can't complain. But our water comes in from a private for profit water company (wells around here tend to go dry during the extended droughts in the summer) and costs over $100 for around 4,000 gallons. Average water bill is usually around $45 a month.

I can't even come close at water used by hand washing the amount of dishes a full load the magic Bosch does for under 5 gallons.

So, it depends on the make and model of the dishwasher when comparing total costs and efficiency of hand washing versus using a dishwasher. And for a Bosch model, cycles of an hour are even more efficient than the over two hour long cycles.
 

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I'm on town water. Everything I have in the house is a water saver type device, the dishwasher and washing machine included. The only time I've ever paid more than the minimum maintenance amount was when I had a leak.

I've got far too many trees to line dry clothes. I'd end having to rewash them after the birds in the trees had their way with them. And I really don't want to cut the trees down to put up a clothesline.
 

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Don't forget to factor in what your time is worth and how much you do or don't enjoy doing a job.

Line drying and hand washing take longer and take more labor input.

I abhor doing dishes - I am convinced dish water feeds on the human soul. So at our house dishes are likely to stack up, whereas if I had a dishwasher there'd never be a dirty dish in the house.
I have the same issue, the hubby hust got a generator, im very tempted to try to find a low wattage portable dishwasher. He had suggested a washer, however i think a dishwasher would make me much happier. Does this make me a bad homesteader?
 

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Bad experience line drying when lived in Florida. Teenager screaming in the bathroom. Towel she used apparently had fly larvae or something on it in excess. Re showered her and had to redo all my towels, drying on porch. To this day I never line dry without that 15 minutes in dryer after they are dry. We had no dryer in Florida.
 

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We down sized to 720 sq ft...no working dishwasher. When hubby remodeled the kitchen I wanted things organized in kitchen so I would not have to reach up in cupboards for everyday dishes and glasses.. There is just hubby and I so this is what I came up with. He instilled a very clean non working dishwasher next to the sink where you would put a working dish washer. I store everyday dishes, silverware, glasses etc. there, just like rollout kitchen cabinets but old dishwasher, free on craigs list. I wash the dishes in sink and put them on the dish washers"s roll out racks. I place a dish towel, to collect drips, on the door and leave the door open until the dishes drip dry, next to the other stored dishes. Then I pick up the towel and close the dishwasher door, So dishes dry in the place they are stored. Hang the towel up to dry ( has only clean water on it and ready for next time). No messy kitchen and saves a step from drainer to cupboard. I am coming 72 and always thinking of possible future needs. Works wonderful, broken dish washer free, no dishes in a drain and no lifting dishes into overhead cabinets.
 

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We down sized to 720 sq ft...no working dishwasher. When hubby remodeled the kitchen I wanted things organized in kitchen so I would not have to reach up in cupboards for everyday dishes and glasses.. There is just hubby and I so this is what I came up with. He instilled a very clean non working dishwasher next to the sink where you would put a working dish washer. I store everyday dishes, silverware, glasses etc. there, just like rollout kitchen cabinets but old dishwasher, free on craigs list. I wash the dishes in sink and put them on the dish washers"s roll out racks. I place a dish towel, to collect drips, on the door and leave the door open until the dishes drip dry, next to the other stored dishes. Then I pick up the towel and close the dishwasher door, So dishes dry in the place they are stored. Hang the towel up to dry ( has only clean water on it and ready for next time). No messy kitchen and saves a step from drainer to cupboard. I am coming 72 and always thinking of possible future needs. Works wonderful, broken dish washer free, no dishes in a drain and no lifting dishes into overhead cabinets.
Great idea for space saving
 
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