Savings from using clothesline and hand washing dishes?

Discussion in 'Cleaning and Organizing' started by Countrygal23, Apr 4, 2016.

  1. Countrygal23

    Countrygal23 homesteader in the making

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    Anyone just use a clothesline for drying and hand wash their dishes? Do you have an estimate of how much money you've actually saved switching to those two instead of using the dryer and dishwasher? Thanks so much!!
     
  2. jwal10

    jwal10 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A lot. No power use, no appliance to buy. We heat the water with a coil in the wood stove, we have running hot water because we have a gravity fed spring. We don't use grid power or propane so can have a very small off grid system. We recycle the water used on the gardens, both edible and flowers. Soapy water is a good bug deterant....James
     

  3. doozie

    doozie Well-Known Member

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    It will all depend on how many loads you dry. Try line drying for a month and see the difference in your bill.
    I line dry almost everything except blankets or really bulky things, sometimes I just start in the dryer and finish off air drying.
    It also depends on humidity.
    In the winter things line dry so fast in my house. I think I may save 20.00+ a month, but it's just two of us.
    It really doesn't take that much time to line dry, but that dryer was a hard habit to break at first for me.

    I also have an electric water heater now, so I am getting used to cold water washing, that's a savings too.

    Never had a dishwasher so I just enjoy the extra cabinet space in my kitchen.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2016
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  4. Rural Economist

    Rural Economist Well-Known Member

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    This is very dependent on several things. Some have been mentioned already such as the number of loads.

    Another factor is how much you pay for the power. Here in Alabama we pay .0821 per kilowatt hour. I ajve heard of other states that pay upwards of .18 per kilowatt hour. Obviously they would save a lot more money doing this than we do.

    At our low rate we save only about 35 cents per load dried. Yes I did the math and I am that bad of a geek. Having said that, I just like my clothes line dried and 35 cents per load does add up. Just food for thought.
     
  5. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Your clothes last longer if they are line dried, so factor that in as well. As for the dishwasher, you don’t save water when hand washing. I don’t know that a dishwasher really ends up using less water, and it does not if you hand rinse everything before hand. Hand washing will save on electricity.
     
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  6. cfuhrer

    cfuhrer Wood Nymph / Toxophilite

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    Don't forget to factor in what your time is worth and how much you do or don't enjoy doing a job.

    Line drying and hand washing take longer and take more labor input.

    I abhor doing dishes - I am convinced dish water feeds on the human soul. So at our house dishes are likely to stack up, whereas if I had a dishwasher there'd never be a dirty dish in the house.
     
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  7. Moboiku

    Moboiku Well-Known Member

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    I've only ever line dried - better for the clothes and saves a ton on gas/electricity. In the winter I can sometimes line dry on a really nice day. Otherwise, I hang the clothes on a clothing rack indoors and place it over a heating vent. They don't dry as quickly as on the outside line but are dry in about 24 hours.

    I do use a dishwasher now, though for about 20 years I didn't even own one. The problem with hand-washing dishes is it is hard to have a neat looking kitchen as there are always either dirty dishes stacking up on one side of the sink, or clean dishes in a dish drainer on the other. Now that I own a dishwasher, I like that the dirty dishes are out of sight. However I still do one load per day of dishes like pots and pans that my manual recommended should not be washed in a dishwasher. These days I use the lower rack of the dishwasher as my dish drainer, so that I can close the door when I'm done and let them drain into the bottom of the dishwasher, then put them away later when they're completely dry. In the meantime the kitchen looks neat and clean.
     
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  8. DisasterCupcake

    DisasterCupcake Crazy Goat Lady

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    My house came with appliances. Electric stove, dishwater, clothes washer, gas (thankfully) clothes dryer, refridgerator.

    Since we wouldn't have spent any more or less on the house for or without the appliances, they were free.

    I only do laundry once a month. (lol) So I use the dryer. I hand wash most of the dishes. Only time I don't is when we have a party and have TONS of dishes to 'hide' away in a hurry. They just go in the ancient dishwasher and I run it a cycle. It doesn't do a good job anyway and uses a lot of water.
     
  9. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It doesn’t take long to discover the true use of the dishwasher. To hide the dishes, clean or dirty.
     
  10. cowbelle

    cowbelle Well-Known Member

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    I stopped using my dryer about 4 yrs ago when it quit working. I've used racks in front of the heater ever since, and the line outside when it's warm for sheets etc. Haven't ever owned a dishwasher. Of course, I'm a single, which makes a difference, but every little bit of savings helps
     
  11. cfuhrer

    cfuhrer Wood Nymph / Toxophilite

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    How does everyone keep their line dried items from getting stiff?
     
  12. Moboiku

    Moboiku Well-Known Member

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    I've never used a dryer on a regular basis so I may be the wrong one to make the comparison but I don't find line-dried clothes stiff at all. Maybe it is just that you are used to dryer-dried clothes?

    I wash in warm water, rinse in cold. My machine is a front-loader and I use Sun brand HE laundry detergent. No fabric softener. No bleach. Just water and detergent. Hang them to dry for a few hours and bring them in. I don't find them stiff at all and love how fresh they smell.
     
  13. BohemianWaxwing

    BohemianWaxwing Well-Known Member

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    We do have both a dishwasher and a drier (as of a couple months ago that someone gave us) but we hand wash and hang dry. To me, it's a life quality issue. Yes, it takes a few more minutes, but it's a zen way to spend those few minutes, kind of like trimming weeds in the pasture on a dewy morning with a scythe instead of running the noisy, stinky mower on a hot afternoon. The fact that it cuts down on the electric bill at all is just a bonus.
     
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  14. Countrygal23

    Countrygal23 homesteader in the making

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    Thanks y'all! I've been wanting a clothesline for a few years keep telling hubby and he hasn't put one in yet but this year im literally making him lol
     
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  15. doozie

    doozie Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to wait, I use my shower rod and hangers for light tops, tshirts.
    There are clips that attach to hangers to dry dish cloths,shorts, or jogging pants. Collapsible hanging racks for socks/undies. We used conduit attached to rafters in basement for hangers too.
     
  16. katlupe

    katlupe Off-The-Grid Homesteader Supporter

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    I have been washing clothes and dishes by hand since 1999, since I am off the grid too. I can't really say how much money it would have saved since we don't have anything to compare it to. I line dry and never had the laundry be stiff. In the winter, I have a laundry rack that I set up next to our chimney upstairs with plastic under the rack to catch any dripping water.

    Dishes is another story. I hate that job, but have been doing it every day since I moved here. But our system is pretty small and not able to handle a dishwasher and our water is not piped into the house anyway. Not going to complain about it since I really like the lifestyle.
     
  17. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Laundry hang dried will be stiff if you use too much detergent. Next time, run everything through with no detergent, just water. The remains of the detergent left in the clothes will be enough to clean them. Most things need half the amount of detergent that is recommended, often even less than that.
     
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  18. Vickivail98

    Vickivail98 Well-Known Member

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    In addition to reducing the amount of soap used I add a little white vinegar to the rinse cycle (in an old downy ball) and it zapps out all stiffness and static.
     
  19. n3ttst3r

    n3ttst3r Member

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    If you don't like the feel of line dried clothes line dry them then toss them in a drier on a fluff only no heat with a drier ball. Gives the drier drier feel without adding the extra electric to heat it, doesn't take long maybe 10ish minutes to fluff them up. My husband doesn't like the feel of line dried so that's our work around to it, saves some money and he gets the fluffy soft clothes he is use to having.
     
  20. Ladyleo191

    Ladyleo191 Member

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    Another trick to avoid stiff clothes is try to do laundry on a breezy day. The more clothes move, the softer they will be. It even improves towels.