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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #1
do i need to let the fruit totally mature on the vine to the point where the stem turns brown, or can i save seeds from younger fruit i harvest?
 

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Retired farmer-rancher
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I doubt that the seed will be matured if the fruit is immature. Also if you have any other types of squash nearby, the seeds may not produce the same fruit next year.
 

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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #3
yeah...i got the cross-pollination thingy, but how do i know when the squash is mature?

thanks!
 

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Retired farmer-rancher
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I would think you should leave it on the vine until the stem turns brown. Then remove the seeds and place them in a place to dry.
 

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We have lots of spaghetti squash from seeds we got from a squash we got last fall at Safeway. Ate the squash, dried the seeds on a paper towel, planted in the spring in the house in peat pots, transplanted etc, and now we have new squash.

Good luck,

Alex
 

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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #6
it was ironic that i searched high and low for white patty pan seeds, finally getting some from a member here late in the spring. lo and behold, a volunteer white patty pan popped up next to the compost pile, lol. that is the squash i want to save as i have not been able to germinate the donated seeds.
 

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I haven't been gardening that long but I saved squash, tomato, pepper, and water melon seeds from last year. All of them germinated as well as the new seeds I bought this year. I just looked at the seeds and compared them to what the bought seeds looked like. You can tell the mature seeds by doing this. I have about 18 or 19 paper plates on top of the cabinets drying now.
I took pictures of each fruit sitting on the plate before I deseeded it and numbered the plate so I can see it in the photo. I also took a picture of the plant the fruit came from, with the numbered plate in front of it.
I even have 6 ears of corn drying also. They are one of the supersweet hybrid vararities but I am going to give them a try and see how they do. I figured I would plant about 4 rows on the back side next year of them and compare them so I will know what the deal is about savring the hybrid seeds.
I am saving seeds from every type of plant I have this year.
This seed thing has me a little worried.
Dennis
 

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leave the fruit on the vine till the stem is drying out, them set the fruit on the shelf or 1 month. the seeds can be harvested and dryed for next year. The same method is good for all curbits. melons, squash and cukes. cukes should be left on the vine till they turn yellow.
 

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Saving seeds from any kind of hybrid plant usually means that the seeds will produce one of the parent plants which may be very undesirable. I let a few "volunteer" squash come up one year, and one was out of this world good. The other was so awful that I could not get the horrible taste out of my mouth for hours. FInally a bit of honey worked.

I'd google it if I were you so you don't waste a lot of time and energy like I did saving seeds from really great squash, only to have really awful stuff in my garden next year.

Pat
 

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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #11
white patty pan is not a hybrid...i am pretty sure. it came true to the "parent" squash, a gift from a neighbor that went bad before i used it, that was thrown on the compost heap. it is not a great distance from my other squash...about 15 yards, but i hope it will not cross pollinate with them. if it does...oh well.

i guess my question was more about being able to tell when the squash was mature enough to produce viable seeds.

thanks.
 

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crafty2002 said:
I took pictures of each fruit sitting on the plate before I deseeded it and numbered the plate so I can see it in the photo. I also took a picture of the plant the fruit came from, with the numbered plate in front of it.
Oh, CLEVER! You can use those pics on your seed envelopes, too. :dance:

I really like this idea. I think I'd have written the plant and variety rather than a number, but the number takes up less space.
 

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Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
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A number of years ago, I saved seeds from one of my acorn squash. I failed to consider the cross pollinating. I had some Zuccuni growing 100 feet away. My squash was dark green, shaped like a fat zuccuni, about 16 inches long and too hard to cut with a knife. Had to cut it with a hack saw/ meat saw.
 

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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #14
lol, half of my squash won't pollinate themselves this year, cross-pollination would be like a virgin birth.
 
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