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It is very easy! Be sure to collect the seeds from mature fruits. Just take out the seeds (and eat the fruit). Let the seeds dry for a couple of weeks before storing them.

Depending on which insects you have at your place, there may be a moderate risk for cross pollination if the jalapeño peppers and the bell peppers are planted close to each other.

I assume that you have open pollinated varieties, not F1?
 

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Just collect and dry them, taking into account what Brian said.

There's a tiny lump on each seed (at the pointy end) that you might prefer to remove with a very sharp knife (and a keen eye). Inside that lump is a growth inhibitor. It's a fiddly job, but you could experiment to see how germination is affected between seeds which have it removed, and those which don't. I only bothered removing it when I was growing commercially - now I don't bother, and I find that sometimes fruit that drops to the ground will self-seed anyway.
 

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culpeper said:
There's a tiny lump on each seed (at the pointy end) that you might prefer to remove with a very sharp knife (and a keen eye). Inside that lump is a growth inhibitor. It's a fiddly job, but you could experiment to see how germination is affected between seeds which have it removed, and those which don't. I only bothered removing it when I was growing commercially - now I don't bother, and I find that sometimes fruit that drops to the ground will self-seed anyway.
I really wouldn't bother about that. I never did anything other than collect and dry, and my experience has been a germination percentage very close to 100 (actually very often 100%) for at least 5 years after saving the seeds.
 

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We just ate a red bell pepper we thought was fantastic! Two weeks ago I dried them for a few days, planted, now we have 12 1" high plants.

Alex
 
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