Sassy Calved

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JeffNY, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Well at 4:30AM on Sunday Sassy calved. It wasn't an unassisted calving, had to pull the calf out. At about 12:45 or so I went down, hooves were barely visible, came down several more times after that and there was slow progress. Well at about 3:00am I came down again, and decided to go back get some sleep till 4:00am. Came back down, no gain from 3-4am. So I figured, time to pull! Grabbed a rope, tied it on the one leg to get them even, get those shoulders straight. Once I did this I noticed the calf starting to gag. Well not knowing what it was, not wanting a dead calf, I tied to the other leg and pulled hard. I was lucky I had a wall to leverage against. After a few minutes I got the calf half way out. Well the hips did get stuck, my mother came down, she shifted over some, she rached in a little and got the hip unstuck, out came the calf. This calf was BIG, first calf heifer, but because it was a bull calf it didn't help any. The calf weighs over 80lbs, is very long legged, the vet guessed him to be about 33" tall. So he is a big guy. Was hoping for a heifer, would be a really nice heifer too, but ah well, atleast she is fine, HOWEVER!


    She didn't get up for a while, called the vet, had him come down. He diagnosed her with milk fever, she was IVed half bottle calcium, and the sub-putaneous the other half of the bottle. She came to better, got up. The calf did pinch the nerve on one of her legs, so she didn't have full balence. The leg is getting better, and she appears to be better. So either way, things appear to be fine, but man what a calf. This makes 1 down, and a bunch more to go. Have one due May 22nd, and another June 6th, with more to follow.


    Jeff
     
  2. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Jeff - Good Job! Best thing you could do now is get that heifer off concrete as much as possible. Moving around using legs and fresh air provide best health for a big fresh heifer like that. If she is on a bedded pack or sod except for milking it will greatly speed her recovery and her chances of becoming a productive, profitable animal for you. Again, good job.
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    They live for the most part off of cement. The pen has cement under the straw, and compacted straw, so it is nice and soft. The walk ways have rubber mats, minus where 4 go on the opposite side of the barn, but that should be changed by this fall. The tie stalls have mattresses, so she has a nice comfortable stall once she gets her bearings back, probably shoot for Thursday. Maybe earlier if things improve faster. Her feeling in her leg has come back nicely, not as bad as it was. So hopefully by Tuesday I might be able to remove the hobble (vet put it on there for safety, due to her pinched nerve from calving), mainly due to her size as well. Her post calving weight is 1390lbs, and I am going to "chart" it so I can see what kind of progress she makes in the next month. It is amazing how much they shrink, from this filled out stomach to a delapedated animal. She has such a large frame it makes it look worse. I figure in a couple weeks she will put on condition, and look much better.


    Also I have a correction, the calf weighs 100lbs, and his height is 33", so the height isn't any different. That bull calf is tall, a lot of leg. For a first calf heifer that is impressive, but she is big, and it being a bull calf didn't make things better. All in all she is doing much better, milked out about 3 gallons, before pulling the milker off, got some corn meal in front of her, and some haylage. She was chewing her cud, drinking, eating and cleaning some. I am glad the ones due this summer are spaced apart some, this fall is going to be incredibly busy. I have 4 within 10 days, and 5-6 in October. Some are Jerseys, they tend to calve out easier. But if only that calf was a heifer, would have been easier, and would be a nice calf. His legs are straight, even though he is young. Nice body too, not dairy, but is built very nicely (not those calves with a tall rear, short front).


    Jeff
     
  4. JSIA

    JSIA Active Member

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    Jeff good to hear things are looking up. We seem to be playing tag on AIM. I forget to shut it off at times, well ok quiet often. :shrug:

    Anyways my heifer did calve. Had a heifer out of the O-man bull. She's small, but is a very vigorous calf. I had to put her on milk replacer as our throw milk is mastitis milk, which I don't realy want to feed to her. Don't really care for replacer as its not the real deal, but she's gotta eat.
    Mommas doing well also. Gave 19 lbs this AM. hopefully that gets a little heftier, but shes only 4 days fresh so can't expect alot.

    1 down, 2 to go.

    PS heifer finally cycled to.

    Jake
     
  5. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Jake,



    Good to hear about that heifer, always sucks if they cant settle and thinking about biting the bullet before sending her. Sassy the last 3 milkings gave about the same 19-20lbs per milking. Her right side isn't fully milked out, but that I don't expect to be milked out for a few more days (Jersey didn't fully milk for a week+. She is showing some promise with her udder, good mammary system is showing, considering she is only 36 hours fresh, but we'll see how things look in 4-6 weeks.


    Same here with the bull calf, very strong calf, getting moms milk. Really sucks it isn't a heifer :p, nice looking calf.


    Jeff