Sales of White and Brown Eggs

Discussion in 'Poultry' started by Yellowsnow, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. FCLady

    FCLady Well-Known Member

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    Yellowsnow No I sell them for the same price. The chickens are in the same yard. Just different kinds of chickens lay different colors.

    I think it's all personal preferences. I've eaten brown eggs for so long, that one day I grabbed white eggs (from my own hens) for breakfast, I actually hesitated before I broke them in the pan... do I really want to eat that.... lol
     
  2. aart

    aart HOW do they DO that?

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    Regional yes, even micro-regional, but it's also marketing strategy.
    Who decided blue eggs would/should /could cost more?
     

  3. slingshot

    slingshot Well-Known Member

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    Blue eggs do cost more, much more to produce in any numbers actually.

    From a production standpoint they are a nightmare. The hens if we are lucky lay 70% and that depends on the way the wind blows I'd say yearly it's more like 50-60%.

    Comparatively my ISA browns currently lay 97% that's a HUGE difference. Cost per egg goes up dramatically when you need to feed twice as many birds to get the same number of eggs.

    Also the birds themselves are much harder to deal with, and the molt randomly which does not help the cause one bit.

    So each bird ingests $0.55 a week in feed, and if I'm lucky I'll get 3 eggs so about $0.18 an egg just in feed cost. Now the brown egg layers eat the same amount but give me 6-7 eggs per week at a cost of $0.9 per egg.

    That means the blue eggs cost 50% more to produce and that's just feed cost, the birds them selfs cost double the amount of the reds. Oh they don't start laying for 10 or so more weeks.

    That's why blue eggs cost more.
     
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  4. Christopher McClung

    Christopher McClung Active Member

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    Just my 2 cents. I was selling over 100 doz a month last year. I started separating in the beginning and noticed the white eggs were sitting a little longer. I then just mixed the different eggs up. Never had a single customer complain about it. I sell far less nowadays, but I just mix them up. We have mostly brown egg layers, but we do have some marans, easter eggers, and a few white egg layers.
     
  5. Alder

    Alder Well-Known Member

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    I'm not going to get into "religion" with my egg customers. ;) It's good enough for me that they buy my eggs, and I don't seem to have any shortage of customers. I do explain why some eggs are brown, green and blue, then let them sort out the rest. It's enough that my eggs taste better, are firmer and yellower than the expensive organic-free-range -mumbo-jumbo eggs in the stores at twice the price.
     
  6. KatsFarm

    KatsFarm Well-Known Member

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    Until this year when we moved far from our customers, we were selling eggs in many colors. I raised hens for the many colors of their shells and even die-hard brown or white egg buyers loved when they received thair cartons of many shell colors. The most popular were those with shades of blue shells. We had more customers than eggs and needed to keep increasing our flock. One man at first told his wife there was no way he would eat anthing but a white egg.... she slipped in our eggs and he refused to go back to his "store bought white" eggs, he also increased his consumption from 3-4 eggs a week, to one full dozen weekly. Another young father was frustrated because his 6 year old refused to eat eggs, until dad brought ours home. The little boy couldn't get enough of his special eggs after that.
    I was being paid $3 per dozen and sold enough to support the chickens and two goats for the year.
    We never told our customers anything about nutrition, etc. Just that the chickens foraged for their food, and we gave every potential customer a free dozen..... then they were hooked. The eggs spoke for themselves. The only thing we ever told them was the more deep yellow or orangey the yolk, the better the nutrition and flavor.
    A year later and we still hear from our customers that they miss our eggs.
     
  7. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    People are very strange
     
  8. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    Wow farmers here sell them $2-$3 a dozen
     
  9. slingshot

    slingshot Well-Known Member

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    I think the biggest difference is if we are talking about hobby farmers, backyard producers or full time farmers.

    It also depends on how your raising the birds, how many you have and how you market the products.

    I own and run a full time fully diversified farm, all the hens are pastured and rotated every 3 days behind our cattle. They also are fed verified non GMO feed, I also have my own egg cartons custom printed. Eggs are a business for me $2 a dozen is unsustainable and below my production costs.

    Many farmers or folks that want to be farmers fall into the trap of undervaluing their products and struggle or fail because of it.
     
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  10. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So many consumers want the best for their families. But few have the time to study what is real and what just sounds good. I've watched the Concerned Consumer movement evolve with the egg. I think it started with EB, Eggland's Best, lower in cholesterol than "normal" eggs. Then it was Brown eggs are better.
    I get such amusement watching people buy eggs. They seem to have these health concerns, morale dilemmas and cost concerns. Vegetarian fed sounds healthy. Brown looks "down on the farm". Cage free might mean happy chickens. Free Range sounds like someone's Grandma is gathering eggs into her apron from the back yard, while Grandpa waves from his tractor over yonder. Organic or Hormone-free is important, too. But the store brand is on sale for 55 cents a dozen.
    Most of our (that's a collective our) off farm sales is based heavily on mythical promotions that end up being half truths. Some the customers already have and some we promote. But the big chain markets do it too.
    Michigan has many millions of hens. I am familiar with one of the big businesses. They have millions of hens, supply eggs from organic fed hens, they offer eggs from un-caged hens and even have free range eggs. Whatever the consumer wants, they supply. They don't waste any time explaining that there isn't two hoots difference between any of those egg choices.

    But having millions of eggs each day means they have to collect, clean, package around the clock. They don't have an egg warehouse. When they get enough for a semi trailer, they ship. So, the eggs in the local stores are often under 24 hours old. So, when I see a sign at the end of a driveway, "Fresh Eggs" I have to smile. Chances are those eggs are a collection that is several days old. The once a week farmers market fresh eggs are the week's inventory.

    But if you are going to be successful, you'd better be a good salesman and promote your product. In my experience, Brown eggs set my eggs apart from store bought white.
     
  11. aart

    aart HOW do they DO that?

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    Very true...am too small scale to have taken that into consideration.
    Blue layers are definitely slackers, especially after the first year.

    Yes, Indeed.
    You've made some very good points, well stated, thank you.

    It's not 'religion'...it's reality, or maybe shining some reality onto that 'religion'.
    Some folks don't understand what the marketing terms really mean.
    I only have a half dozen 'customers'......most of them want to know that 'cage free' still means they are stuffed into a crowded space and that 'pastured' means there's a small door, to a small space outside the building, that the birds rarely pass thru.
     
  12. Alder

    Alder Well-Known Member

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    By the term "religion" I mean that the terminology is mostly based on "belief" not fact. I personally don't care if my customers think cage-free means something. I make no such claims - whether "organic", "cage-free" "non-GMO", "pasture-raised" or any of it. It's all pretty much hoke-um to me, and I refuse to participate, but that's my flavor of "religion". If they taste the eggs, they buy the eggs, That's all that matters on my feed bill. I'm an annoyingly confirmed pragmatist.

    Don't get me started on "Heirloom" vegetables... ;)
     
  13. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Marketing. That is an area I've tried to stay out of. While I'd make a good salesman, great gift of gab, I hate being a player in the misinformation game. Every year, there is more misinformation on food. The 5 or 6 different choices for eggs is one example. Then just when you have prioritized your egg choices, you discover that the words are either meaningless or misleading.
    Strips of breaded chicken breast labeled, "hormone free", when there never was any chicken added hormones. High priced steaks labeled, "Pasture raised" when most beef is raised on a pasture. Heirloom tomatoes that are new varieties selected due to their lumpy shapes or odd color, not from seeds saved by Grandma. Might as well put a label on a tub of lard, "sugar free" and a bag of white sugar, " fat free". True, but there is the implication that it is special.
     
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  14. ChocolateMouse

    ChocolateMouse Well-Known Member

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    ?????? Heirloom varieties of vegetables are just breeds that breed true or are open pollinated so the farmers can save seeds from one year to plant the next, as opposed to hybrid or genetically modified seeds which do not. Many (though not all) of the varieties are also old especially compared to hybrids, hence the name. How is that false???
    Admittedly, store bought eggs are all the same due to no real difference in regulation of care, but there have been accredited studies done on chicken showing that if the are fed/raised differently their nutritional contents can be different. Same with vegetables and meats. I pretty much won't buy store eggs any more except for baking (which usually I'm making a cake or something bad for you anyhow so I don't care as much).
    I totally understand not wanting to be misleading with labels, and many of them can be misleading. But sometimes it seems like some folks take it too far the other way cause there can be some real difference in nutrition (not to mention flavor!) based on care and this has been studied and proven. Some people are just eager to drink the kool-aid I guess.
     
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  15. Yellowsnow

    Yellowsnow Well-Known Member

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    IMO heirlooms are open pollinated, but a lot of open pollinated tomatoes are not heirlooms. To me heirlooms are the old time varieties that had been passed down over time.

    Yes, the marketing with eggs and meat is a little nuts. But when 5 corporations control almost the entire industry games can be played I guess.
     
  16. aart

    aart HOW do they DO that?

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    Yeppers, I knew that by your use of quotation marks, and agree 100%. But my few customers are acquaintances/friends and it's long been my "religion" to debunk marketing 'lies'......so I 'splained it to them and they were kinda glad to know.

    Me too.<thumbsup>
     
  17. wendygoerl

    wendygoerl Member

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    Well, I don't have any numbers, but as a thought experiment, I would have to conclude it depends on how knowledgeable your customers are. Most of the commercially-favored breeds lay white, so the average consumer has come to expect eggs to be white. Stupid consumers think white is the "right" color for eggs and anything else is either "wrong" or "doctored" and won't buy anything colored. Somewhat smart consumers realized most commercial eggs are white, and so associate brown eggs with non-commercial, likely "organic" production--which is probably why commercial production is starting to introduce more brown eggs. Really smart consumers know shell color doesn't have much to do with egg quality and will look for other factors.

    So the real question is: what kind of customers do you have?
    (Although you might get a bit more for blue/green eggs simply for the novelty of being "different"--especially around Easter.)
     
  18. slingshot

    slingshot Well-Known Member

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    This is true....

    Customers are extremely educated, and we as producers should never assume otherwise.

    The reason I sell so many blue eggs is because my customers know they are from heritage breed hens and like the sustainability. I've had entire conversations debating the merits of standard breed or hybrid breed hens and it's is remarkable the information they have on the subject.
     
  19. Yellowsnow

    Yellowsnow Well-Known Member

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    Stupid is a pretty strong word. I can understand your point, but not everyone studies eggs, farming practices, or the how's/why's of poultry, and food supply.
     
  20. Yellowsnow

    Yellowsnow Well-Known Member

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    Blue eggs can come from mutts, as most of them do. True heritage breeds lay white, brown (of all shades), and blue. Would those same customers buy white or brown eggs from say Leghorns/Spanish or Dominiques?