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agmantoo
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I would inject an ivermectin product. I would want to be certain they got the correct amount into their system without any doubt or question. A good mineral available could possible help also.
 

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The hay is coastal. Il go the 16% creep. Any suggestions on wormer.
The hay gut your calves are carrying makes me think they aren't getting enough protein in their feed. Adding a half to a pound of alfalfa pellets or a flake of alfalfa hay to their diet in addition to the creep pellets could help with that. Little calves need a highly digestible diet because they don't have the rumen capacity to handle what a bigger calf can. The better you do growing them now the better they will do later.

Your little bull calf doesn't look too bad but your heifer calf could look better. I bought an old pair a month ago and the calf looked worse then yours but has really grew since then, her hair probably won't look good until she sheds in the spring though. The old cow has gained with the feed she has been getting too.
 

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Bovine and Range Nerd
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My son in law brought me some creep that was pretty much powdered. I feed them that first and then put them on the small pelleted creep and calf starter. Now they get sweet feed. I noticed they have 12% and 16% what does the percentage mean.
Bobby is partially right. The percentages are Crude Protein, the stuff that includes protein nitrogen and non-protein nitrogen (which is urea). I hope you're not feeding any feed with NPN in them, because calves at this age cannot and should not have any urea simply because they are incapable of digesting it. They must have the protein nitrogen that comes in alfalfa, soybean meal, canola meal, etc.

I did say before to go with the high-protein stuff. The sweet feed is high in energy, but too much of a good thing. I concur with removing the sweet feed and going with the creep feed or calf starter. You might want to feed a little corn too to get some weight on them, especially that heifer. You can't feed something that is high in protein without feeding something else that is sufficient/high in energy, as these two nutrients go hand-in hand in ruminant nutrition, especially with young calves as these. Have the hay tested too, because a high fibre content can slow them down. Too much lignin (part of the fibre equation) is hard for a young calf or any age bovine to digest and simply stays in the gut and stays and stays until protein requirements are met and the animal can poop it out. (It's the exact opposite in horses.) I'm thinking that's part of the reason these calves look so pot-bellied, besides the parasite load, hence the term "hay belly".
 

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Since it's to late to edit my previous post I'll add here that calf mana would be another good product to add to their feed to up the protein instead of the alfalfa.
 

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Hi to all,
This is my first posting and wanted to respond to raising bottle calves. In the last 2 years I have raised over 300 calves. Most we get from local farmers and they keep them 3 days before we pick them up or one farmer give us the milk and I feed them this for 3 days. I really love bottle feeding and the calves they all have names and spoiled. I have a picture of a calf coat I make out of old quilts. The cost here in VA is anywhere from $20.00 to $175.00. We have a set price from the farmers and take them year round.
 

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ok so LOTS of questions here. My wife and I are school teachers ( her Sciences me History) we moved onto a 5 acre Homestead last year and decided to raise some of our own food. I have raised pigs, I have a flock of egg layers, and I just started a flock of Heavies for meat chickens. I really want to raise a cow also. do I do a cow or a bull? How long before I can put the meat in my freezer (quality meat)? Is there a breed I should look for? Is pasture going to be enough to feed it or should I plan on bringing in those big bales of hay? How much should I plan to spend on a cow. Are the $40-$60 prices I see here per head? are they still close to current market? Thanks for reading and your help.
 

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Hi jhammett , i know that angus are meat cows, hereford also, im originally from south Texas, by the king ranch, they developed the santa gertrudis by crossing the brahma and shorthorn. They are very tolerant of texas weather. I got mine from the feed lot which is probably considered high risk but i have had some good luck with these two. Probably because they are santa gertrudis and have a high tolerance. I got mine straight from the mama. Had to feed them the colostrum myself. I plan on breeding mine. I couldnt eat them after raising them. But the calves are a different story. I want get as close to them. Good luck with whatever choice you make.
 

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When I visit the sale barn I notice some bull calves sell for $10 while others sell for $60. What a big difference and in my opinion the $10 calves are high risk...Just my opinion.
I have raised 325 + bottle calves in the last 4 years with very good results, out of over 1and some yearly we average only 4 to 7 not to make it. I agree with the livestock sales some come in and not even have been with the mother. We don't buy from sales unless we know the farm they came from. Most of our calves come from 3 different farmers 2 are organic and they do very well they leave them with there mother 4 to 3 days and if they don't do well the refund the cost or another calf. I don't know where you are but here in Virginia in the valley you are lucky to get a calf under $100.00 to $i75.00 a better deal if you work with a farmer and take them year round.
Calflady
 

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This is all great information, something I will come back to many times I am sure. Can you guys tell me...do the same buyers guidelines apply to beef calves? I mean, shots, the MR routine, etc? Is there anything I would look for or do differently if I am buying a Brangus calf instead of a Jersey or similar?

Thanks in advance for any answers. I am not buying right now, but may someday...
 

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Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
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This is all great information, something I will come back to many times I am sure. Can you guys tell me...do the same buyers guidelines apply to beef calves? I mean, shots, the MR routine, etc? Is there anything I would look for or do differently if I am buying a Brangus calf instead of a Jersey or similar?

Thanks in advance for any answers. I am not buying right now, but may someday...
Around here it is rare to sell a beef calf days after birth. Beef cows' job is to give birth to a healthy calf and feed it. Dairy cows' job is to make milk to sell. The calf is important, but secondary. Many dairy farmers get rid of their unwanted calves right away. No reason to market a beef calf early, unless the cow died giving birth.
 

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Around here it is rare to sell a beef calf days after birth. Beef cows' job is to give birth to a healthy calf and feed it. Dairy cows' job is to make milk to sell. The calf is important, but secondary. Many dairy farmers get rid of their unwanted calves right away. No reason to market a beef calf early, unless the cow died giving birth.
Ok, that is good to know. I prefer not to buy beef calves at all, but to breed my own, but if I find no open heifers or cows at auction that are a good buy, I thought to possibly pick up young calves and raise them to sell when they are older and larger. The cattle prices here are very high right now, I have scoured ads in my area for a week, read all sale sights, etc, and I want to learn everything I can before going to a sale.

Thanks for the help, I appreciate it.
 

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Ok, that is good to know. I prefer not to buy beef calves at all, but to breed my own, but if I find no open heifers or cows at auction that are a good buy, I thought to possibly pick up young calves and raise them to sell when they are older and larger. The cattle prices here are very high right now, I have scoured ads in my area for a week, read all sale sights, etc, and I want to learn everything I can before going to a sale.

Thanks for the help, I appreciate it.

What is available varies from region to region. I can buy baby beef calves here regularly numbers available vary from season to season though.

Baby calves are off the wall here as far as price, I can buy a bigger calf for a couple hundred dollars more then the bottle calves are going for. Keep you pencil sharp and your mind open.
 

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This is a good post. Thanks. I haven't been to a sale barn in a few years because of my move out west and selling all of our head, but this is good information. From my experience, larger sale barns will not let you in to "commingle" with your possible purchases prior to the actual sale/auction. Glad whenever I was looking, I was at a small town gathering and most of the people in the sales I knew personally. Great topic.
 

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I only raise dairy heifers any dairy breed 7 days old or less last year I think it was 93 calfs I sold 60 at 400 lbs. and still have 33 left will sell in June


stress is the reason I give MR to the calfs the first few feedings the less change I can do the better I am sure most dairys feed calves MR or since most of my calves I buy are holstiens ...holstien milk ..... thats a big jump from MR or Holstien milk to jersey milk ......so I try to give them something they are use to.. then after they settle in they can handle the jersey milk

I also seem to be able count the days after I get them home on day 3 or day 10 you really need to spend some time with the calfs thats when every thing shows up that they might have picked up at the sale barn


tjm
If they pick up something at sale barn and it shows up on day 3 or day 10 what do you give them?:cow:myersfarm
 

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Ok here is what I do

I buy everything other people do not buy and I also buy everything you would buy

I buy 15 to 30 at a time ....but this is my 6 year doing this

A sale barn calf and a home bught calf are two totally different animals treated the same way the sale barn will die with a sale barn calf you have hours not days as a farm raised calf you have


I put 5 calves in a pen thats 5 calfs that usually cost me and average of $150 if i raise 3 of the 5 I make lots of money if get lucky and raise 4 of 5 then i really make a lot of money on that pen....I also buy the highest calfs at the sale barn those sell for a average of $400 put them in pen of 5 if I raise all 5 then I really make money on that pen ...

my usual average on the price of calves is $260 a calf thats the price I have in the LIVE CAlFS thats like buying 10 for $250 thats $2500 if I lost 2 then the average is $312

the best time to buy calfs is from October to January during the holidays when nobody wants to feed calfs on Christmas day Thanksgiving or New Years day


I give a shot of 1 cc batamine and 2 cc of LA200 when I put them in my trailer..as most time they have a 6 hour trip before they get to my house

I feed colostrum the first meal home then i feed Milk Replacer for the first 3 days then go to my Jersey Milk gradually

What you have to learn is what you have when you unload form the trailer

who needs what Calfs are like kids they can not tell you only show you they feel bad....I set out there every day for a hour watching the calfs see who is the last to the milk bar if the calfs swap on being last they get a shot

never believe that they will get better believe they will die in the night as they will

the way the coat on a calf lays tells me a lot about whats going on with the calf

A calf that cleans n it own coat does not need anything one that does not will die very fast


A calf when it sucks holds it's head high will be sick soon

A calf that does not meet you at the gate will be sick soon

A calf will die before you can go buy and get back with what you need so have it on hand now.


just my 2 cents


I have 31 on milk right now next week will be down to 20 on milk and be buying more
tjm
More information would be good....I am a begiinner in cattle.... pigs I dont have a problem. but cattle I need some one with plenty of experience that they are willing to share to get me up and running.

I swapped two calves for 30 kg of honey year before last year and they are nearly full grown...ready to mate well and truly. then i bought 5 calves last year and they have done well.....so just a month ago I bought 20 calves. they all had the scours and some still have the scours..have tried different things and have manage to dry some of them up....but what else can i do.

all receiving hay, group one on pellets, and grain mix with oaten hay and lucerne hay ground in to the mix but in a more substantial size than the grain. they also get bentonite and some psyllium husk in the trough....want to take them off the pellets and add milk to their mix...cheaper option.
theyg et hay when finished their ration. they also get a salt, sugar carb soda solution in their water trough which they drink when finished.

Second group were in the shed, but too wet and cold, so a new paddock with a hut. they get 2 litres of milk with 200g of powder aded they also get a pellet, grain ration and hay to last them out the day...they are given bentonite Also they are given the salt, sugar, carb soda water to drink for a few hours of the day.

calves were scouring kwhen i first bought them and was told they would just need hay, they were 4 - 7 weeks of age when I bought them.......they were skinny..... and really lacking. some have picked up but time is about all they have right now and me. any ideas on how long it will take for them to start to pick up...hads rained all day today and has been miserable and cold...
 

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If you do not know what you are doing, you may buy calves that are going to die, no matter the treatment.

Most avoid buying scouring calves.

Your sugar, salt, soda water is what we call electrolytes. Scours will quickly dehydrate a calf. The electrolytes replace the lost minerals and fluids, without upsetting their digestion like milk will.

I always keep scours tablets on hand. Not sure what pills are available to you.

The chances that you can save one often depends if they had colostrum right after birth to impart the antibodies that protect the calf in the crucial first weeks of a calf's life.

This thread has 200 posts. Read them all, preferably prior to a winter visit to the livestock auction. Many people have spent their lives in self-taught calve husbandry, this thread serves as a speed course and is valuable.

I use the bentonite to seal off a water well and leave it off the list of calf feed. Don't know why you'd want to use psyllium husks that increases fecal moisture in scouring calves? I have no idea what those pellets you are feeding might contain.

You mentioned 2 L of milk, each day. Is that all at once? Better to space it out in two, three or four feedings. You also said you add powder to the milk. Powdered what?

As far as your question about when they'll get over it, scours generally kills calves in just a few days. So, you won't have long to wonder. Weakened by scours, pneumonia often sets in and without antibiotics, leaves them dead in their pen in a couple days.
 
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