safe, accessible shot gun storage?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dalilies, May 26, 2005.

  1. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    Hubby is finally going to third shift. Yipppee except for I'll be home alone with 3 kids all night. We currently keep a revolver by the bed in a gun vault. We like having the easy access but still safe from the kids. It is hubby's size gun and I am not very comfortable with it. I have weak wrists and waining hand strength. Makes it hard to hold his revolver steady for more than a minute or two, which would not be good in a bad situation. I am going to take it out for some target practice but I much prefer a good old fashion 12 gauge. It is much easier for me to steady it against my shoulder.

    Does anyone know of a safe or vault for a shot gun that gives easy access in the dark like the gun vault? The gun vault opens with a finger pressure combo that can be done silently in the dark. With kids, we won't store a gun that isn't locked up.

    Jennifer
     
  2. Conni

    Conni Well-Known Member

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    Could you find a lighter weight handgun to keep in your existing safe?
     

  3. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm not much of a fan of a long gun for defense inside the house, imho you're better off with a handgun at close quarters. Have you considered strengthening your wrists with a simple exercise? Wind a length of string on a piece of old broom handle or something similar. Attach a small weight of, oh, about one or two pounds to begin with. Now, lay the weight on the floor while holding the stick out in front of you at shoulder height. Start winding with your wrists. After you're able to do 20-25 of those, increase the weight.

    If you haven't already, take a firearms course, and practice, practice, practice. Nobody's saying you have to become Annie Oakly, but if you are serious about defending yourself and your loved ones it's necessary. Here's to hoping you're never in a situation where you learn if you've practiced enough.
     
  4. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps something like one of the airweight .38 revolvers if you want to keep to a handgun? I do agree that a 12ga with the shortest legal barrel makes a good home defense weapon, but I'm not aware of any quick access safes sized for a shotgun. I also encourage training, professional if possible, or at least practice on soda cans out back.
     
  5. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    I'm ex-Navy. Was a torpedoman's mate. :) I've had formal training. I also waitressed for quiet a few years. I battle carple tunnel. After this springs building frenzy. (Had to build a small building for my daughter's 4-H turkeys) my wrists just ache. I'll try the exersizes.

    Hubby said that he knows someone with a ladies smith and weson that I could look at. We do have a smaller revolver. I just prefer the shot gun because it is way easier for me to shoot and the chu-chuk of a shell loading, gives an intruder a chance to leave and if it is a friend or family member a warning to speak up quick!

    Thanks for the replies,
    Jennifer
     
  6. cast iron

    cast iron Well-Known Member

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  7. alabamared

    alabamared Well-Known Member

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    Also , those children should be taught to use and respect ALL the guns in your house.
     
  8. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I would also go with a smaller handgun. I just don't like long guns for inside the house. It is far too easy for an intruder to cover the distance to you and be inside the muzzle. Once an intruder grabs the end of the barrel you're pretty much in a wrestling match which is something I'd like to avoid with some drugged up goblin intent on doing harm to my delicate person. To get a long gun down to a usable length for inside requires you to go below the arbitrary and asinine NFA regs and you run afoul of various laws that will land you in federal PMITA prison. I've got a Mossberg 590 riot gun (the military model #50665 or something like that) which is a fine weapon but it just isn't practical for using inside the home.

    I would say a visit to your local well stocked gun store (which is always a good thing) for a feeling out session with various handguns is in order. They make oodles and gobs of handguns for ladies these days. You are sure to find something you like. Let hubby pick something out for himself too. 'tis only fair ;) Can't have too many firearms around.
     
  9. Big country

    Big country Well-Known Member

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    With others in the house I would prefer a short barrel shotgun; a handgun can easily shoot through wall and wound someone in another room. As long as you don’t load the shotgun with too large of a shot it will be unlikely to shot through a wall and possibly injure an unintended person.
    I would use a combination lock locking device on the gun, but would NOT keep it in a case or cabinet. Practice working the lock until you can do it in the dark, without the need to look at it.
     
  10. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    If you are truly battling carpal tunnel syndrome - exercise may aggravate not help.
    There may be other alternatives.
    If interested you can pm me and I will be glad to discuss this.
     
  11. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Appears to me that with a long gun all you need to control is the ammunition.
    An old shot gun could be easily loaded especially a breech type. You could store the shells where you now have the pistol.
     
  12. Hermit

    Hermit Active Member

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    I think a shotgun makes the most sense. Obviously, you want to avoid a wrestling match for the weapon of choice, but if the intruder is close enough to grab your shotgun, they really are close enough to grab your pistol too. The difference is only a few inches between a waist-high shotgun and a pistol at bent-arm length.

    There are some very simple self defense moves you can practise with a broom handle (cut to length) that will make anyone who grabs your shotgun very sorry they did, all without actually firing a shot.

    Please be very careful about trusting any kind of combination lock. Given enough time, a person can just sit patiently and try every combination, starting with 001 or 0001. For this reason, a combination lock isn't good for long-term storage. Someone (a kid who is curious and bored or a crook) can remove the weapon to a safe location where they won't be discovered, and eventually gain complete unfettered use of the firearm.

    I don't know of a real easy answer to your problem. You probably don't want to sleep with a shotgun next to you in bed (no round in chamber, please, if you do, but feel free to have shells in the magazine tube). A keyed lock is something you might have to fumble with in the dark. A combination lock can be figured out. A safe takes too much time to get into.

    Please take seriously the comments about projectiles (of any kind) penetrating walls and hitting people in other rooms. This might be desirable if a scumbag is hiding behind a door, but really bad if you've got kids in the room behind that scumbag. Just think it through, and buy/load what makes the most sense. Having the 1st round be a rubber bullet or a non-lethal beanbag might be an option.

    Food for thought.

    Hermit
     
  13. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Wayne :p I knew someone would know where to find what I was looking for.

    I am a firm believer in shoot first. That is one of the reasons I like the sound of chambering a round. If Hubby comes home early he can holler when he hears it and before I shoot!

    My concern with holding the weapon steady has more to do with a search of the house. It takes a couple minutes to search a house correctly. I find it much easier and less fatiguing to hold a shotgun than carrying a handgun.

    All of our kids are taught what guns are, what they do, and not to mess with them, but study after study has proven that sometimes kids get curious when Mom or Dad aren't looking and you don't know if their playmates have been taught to respect firearms. That is why all of ours are in safes. It is a pain when a coon is into something, but I would prefer to miss the coon than loose a kid.

    Quint, if we buy many more we will need another big safe! Hubby was a gun dealer before the paperwork got to be such a pain. The Mossberg 590 is my favorite. I just love it. It is so cute! :haha: We even have the bayonet so I can dress it up and black goes so well with so many things. Who says shot guns can't be fashion accesseries!


    Thanks for all the input.
    Jennifer
     
  14. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    Hermit,

    One of the things we love about the gunvault is that it locks down if you mess the combination up too many times in a row and there is an indicator light if someone has been messing with it. It is at gunvault.com.

    Jennifer
     
  15. Hermit

    Hermit Active Member

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    Thanks for the link - I'll check them out.
     
  16. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    First off i gotta ask how old your kids are? mine are 4,3 and 1 and the older 2 leave my firearms alone, they know not to touch them at all..... so my firearms are right there in plain sight no mysteries, just like when i was growing up..... education starts early, demsytification is the key.

    secondly, I personally am not aware of any vaults for a long rifle, or shotgun that act similar to the pistol vault you already have and are familiar with.

    third, investing in a well trained gaurd dog may be a better option, if you think about it, even though one costs more the right trained dog will be loyal to your family and wont harm the kids and dont have to be locked up, and will prtect your property whether alone or with you. And they are so much more warm late at night in the middle of winter too if you can pull them off the kids bed.

    Just a thought

    William
     
  17. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    My kids are 2,4, and 12. The 12 yr old has been taught proper safety and shooting. She is a pretty good shot. I have fond childhood memories of doing stuff that I knew wasn't allowed but my parents weren't looking. Luckily, none of it was deadly. I teach them and they won't touch one when we are around, but I can't say that I trust my 4 yr old boy if I was out of the room. He is very bright and inquisitive. He likes to try everything himself. He already thinks he know better than Mom what is safe and isn't. I'm letting him find out on his own that Mom knows best but I won't risk it with a gun. Plus, we have other kids over to play pretty often.

    We do have a dog, but she is my early warning and diversion while I aim and shoot. Dogs can be shot and then I would be defensless.

    We live in a very low crime area of Ohio. I really don't believe I would ever have need of a weapon, I just don't want to regret not being prepared if I'm wrong.

    Right now, we are leaning towards the shells in the safe idea. Bedroom decorating gets complicated with gun safes surrounding the bed. :rolleyes:
     
  18. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    agmantoo hit it on the head. Control the ammunition. Tell your kids to stay away from the shotgun. Period. Keep the ammunition locked up but nearby.
     
  19. thebeav

    thebeav Well-Known Member

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    Someone help me out there. I think its 45 cal. that is the same size as a 410 shotgun. Anyway, a long time ago a friend of mine had a little derringer. I think it was 45 cal. 410 shotgun shells fit perfect. The end of the shells came just inside the end of the little over/under barrels. This was the perfect “up close and personal” weapon.
     
  20. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    The problem I have with using shotguns inside is not only that an assailant can grab the muzzle it is that they are just too long and unwieldy.....at least in my house. I had a shortened shotgun once (well still have) that was just an inch or two over the legal limits. It didn't have a buttstock just pistol grips. While this was a bit easier to maneuver and less likely to be wrenched away in actual practice the weapon wasn't quite as useful as I had hoped. It was difficult to shoot accurately, a chore to hold on to when firing and awkward to operate. Oh, it looked positively evil and was entertaining/painful to shoot occasionally but not really the "house gun" I had hoped it would be. Loading it up with full house slug and buck loads and rapidly running through a magazine was an exercise in masochism. In a word....ouch.

    I just prefer a handgun for inside. A shotgun when loaded with defensive ammunition is going to be just as apt to penetrate walls and doors as a bullet fired from a handgun and since you are throwing more projectiles downrange may be even more likely to hit someone you didn't intend it to. Some people will use a load of birdshot instead but that is a less than effective defensive load. Birdshot just isn't incapacitating.

    Whatever you choose, invest in a good high intensity flashlight designed for use with a handgun or other weapon. A great help in identifying who exactly is crawling through your window and the good ones are so bright they can actually temporarily blind and dazzle your opponent and give you an extra split second to take whatever action you deem necessary. Trying to figure out who is who in the dark while flailing around trying to find a light switches with one hand while your gun is in the other isn't the best way to defend ones family. I've always found it to very helpful to run through different situations in the house with whatever weapon you would likely use both in the daytime and in the dark. It helps more than you think it would and can reveal lots of things you might not otherwise think of.