???'s on laying slate.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by crashy, Jun 14, 2006.

  1. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    Ok I want to put slate in my house. For the entry way theres linoleum(sp?) then a layer of the pressboard stuff then below that is 2x6 t.n.g. My question is can I lay the tiles on top of the press board or do I need to rip that out and lay down that cement board stuff. If I just lay it on the press board will it work out ok?
     
  2. albionjessica

    albionjessica Hiccoughs after eating

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    I'm guessing Melissa would be able to answer any slate questions. :D
     

  3. gardenwitch

    gardenwitch Well-Known Member

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    When we put our slate in, we ripped up the linoleum till we got to the subfloor. Then we put underlayment down...it is that really thin wood. then we put the slate in. That was about a year ago, and it is in our mud room and panty. Both get a lot of traffic, and it still looks great.

    Just my opinion, but it was the worst job I think I ever had to do. I mean it looks great, it was the worst in the way of work. I am pretty tough, and will do anything around the house, but those two floors.....I don't think I ever cursed so much at an inanimate object before!! It was the grout that did me in. The slate we got is pretty rough, so the grout would stick in there, and washing it off was so hard!! If we ever do slate again, (I love the look) I would hire someone to do it. Yes we saved money, but the time doing the grout I was about to snap. I get that twitch back now that I'm thinking about it... :grit:

    But that was just the way we did it. Worked great.
     
  4. gardenwitch

    gardenwitch Well-Known Member

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    oh, I almost forgot, They do have this stuff that I kick myself for not buying, but you put it on the slate before you grout it, and you make sure you dont get any in the crevise where the grout goes. Then when you grout, it's like a barrier for the tile, and any grout that got on the tile should wipe right off. I think I just did a search for slate sealer, and I found that.

    Man I wish I bought it.
     
  5. dseng

    dseng Member

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    BEFORE you start laying any of that expensive slate do yourself a favor and pay a visit to the John Bridge website. The forum there can provide you with an incredible amount of knowledgable advice. http://www.johnbridge.com/ Go to the Tile Advice Forums.
     
  6. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Since it is not a location I'd expect to get wet all the time (unlike laundry or bath) I think you'd be just fine putting in on a wood substrate, assuming the floor is in good shape and there is no great flexing. A thin luan sheet on top would make a nice clean base. Use the flexible thin set and go for it. If you expect a lot of moisture I'd put down a cement board backer first.
     
  7. dseng

    dseng Member

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    Oh - and to answer your question myself - slate tiles need to go over Cement Backer Board (Hardiboard, Wonderboard, etc).

    The tile pros on the John Bridge forum can walk you through every step of the entire project - from calculating your floor deflection (don't want those tiles to crack because the floor moves!) through a great grout job.
     
  8. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    Slate and tile do not NEED to go over a cement backer. There are countless millions of feet of slate, stone and tile that are thinsetted to plywood. Prior to the availabilty of backer board, I did many kitchens and baths with a layer of 1/2 ply screwed to the subfloor. they still look great today.
     
  9. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    with todays products, hardy board or durock would be best, 1/2 plywood, well screwed ,would be fine as a second choice.Luan in my opinion is for sheetgoods only, not good under tile or slate.
     
  10. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    I would generally agree with your statement. I did have an odd experience with luan. On a house I was building, a tilesetter prepped a small foyer for tile by stapling 1/4" luan over the 3/4" plywood. I was furious, and told him to rip it out. Somehow, he convinced the homeowner that everything would be fine and he tiled it. Seventeen years later the job still looks good. He was right. He claimed that he has done hundreds of installations like this, and never had a problem. Hard to argue with something that hasn't been a problem in nearly two decades of hard use?
     
  11. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

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    as an aside,
    Home Depot has gauged slate on for a regular price of 1.05$/sq.'....I bought a pallet and a half last Friday... thinking about getting another couple of pallets...this is the lowest price I've ever found. (find it cheaper online, but with shipping, it get's expensive)...

    Is the pressboard solid? Real solid? If not I'd probably put another layer of something down... also, I trust the folks over at the johnbridge site.
     
  12. djb473

    djb473 Well-Known Member

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    rip up everything to the toung and groove plywood,cover the surface with 1/4 " luanan & PLACE SCREWS EVERY 3-4 INCHES,(THIS IS CRITTICAL SO THAT THE FLOOR DOES NOT FLEX BENEATH YOURFLOOR SURFACE AND CAUSE IT TO CRACK)then apply the slate. as long as you use enough screws you should be good to go
     
  13. jill.costello

    jill.costello Well-Known Member

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    Wow, thanks for the info about Home Depot's low price! I have always loved the look of slate, but never pursued it because of what I thought it would cost....

    An aside: How do you cut the slate to fit at walls and turns? Must you have one of those big tile cutters with the water/ etc, or is there a cheaper, more common-person way????
     
  14. dseng

    dseng Member

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    You can cut slate with a carbide blade in a circular saw, but if you have very many cuts to make a wet saw will be worth its weight in gold. You should be able to rent a wet saw for $30-40/day.

    As has been indicated throughout this thread, there are always many ways to do things when it comes to your house. Every choice, from materials, to tools and methods, will impact the final results that hopefully will last for many years. The amount of care and craftsmanship put into a job are critical. Do it right and only do it once.

    The previous owner of our house laid beautiful ceramic tile on 1.5 inches of plywood - apparently thinking that the plywood would be thick enough to handle the tile - but what he DIDN'T think about was that the plywood is only supported by 2x8 floor joists across a 12 foot span - which allows the whole floor to flex enough that rolling our refrigerator and pellet stove across the floor cracked most of the tiles! :( You can't feel it when you walk on it, but it certainly moved enough to break! Thus my "do it right" comment above...
     
  15. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    Never thought about staples. the problem we had was nails popping or blowing through which would loosen up and cause cracks. Staples would hold far better. might try it on the next job, they have water resistant luan now, might be ok for the mud rooms etc.
     
  16. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    I bought a cheapie 4" wetsaw for about $40.00 at Lowes. I did all my entrances and bathrooms in ceramic tile with this cheapie saw....

    I still have it, and I'm thinking about adding a ceramic backsplash in the kitchen around the sink and stove.

    As far as the cement board, I used it over the subflooring and then added the tile. The only purpose is to keep the floor from flexing and breaking out the tiles and grout.

    My sister laid ceramic tiles over plywood and has not had any troubles either...I think mostly you need a solid and stable floor...
     
  17. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Main purpose for the cement board was to have a water resistent backing--around shower or tub surrounds, bathroom or laundry floors. If it can get a lot of soaking use a substrate that is not going to rot or delaminate like wood or plywood. If you are only getting occasional water from wet feet when it rains, cleaning a floor, ect. than the wood products will be fine. The luan will provide a clean unblemished subtrate for the quickset. Either backer requires a stable subfloor that will resist flexing.
     
  18. gardenwitch

    gardenwitch Well-Known Member

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    Luan, thats what it was that we used...I couldn't think of the name!
     
  19. Gideon

    Gideon Well-Known Member

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    If there is ANY particle board down there get it out completely. The stuff will swell when wet-just sawdust and glue. Waferboard is almost as bad. Marine plywood is what we used under ours in the baths. Now I would use the cement board.