?'s @ finishing sheetrock????

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by lacyj, Feb 2, 2004.

  1. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    We're starting to tape and mud the sheetrock seams on a 1000' house.
    1)They had two kinds of mud, spackle and finish spackle, do I really need to use both types?
    The regular is pretty thick and hard to work with.The finish type goes on a bit easier. I still plan to coat, three times.
    We are not texturing the walls, as most will be covered with wallpaper or wood.
    I've been using the webbed tape, instead of paper.And, outer, corner strips of plastic.
    2)Someone told be to run a bead of paintable caulk on the inside corners, should I?
    I am making alot of caulk dust, and the shop vac, won't suck it up, 'cause it's too fine(It plugs up the bag, real fast)
    3)What's the best way to get the dust off?
    I will need to wipe down all surfaces, before applying paint.
    4)Can I use a damp cloth?
    5)What can I use for a tack rag, without actually buying them?
    Thanks in advance for any input...
    lacyj
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    1. The thick mud needs to be thinned with water, reguardless of what it says on the bucket. Add water and stir a big bunch.

    2. No, get an 'inside cornor' trowel, apply mud, insert paper strip, reapply mud.

    3. Damp 'turtle back' spounge. From the masonary section of tool suppliers.

    4. No, waste of time.

    5. Again, turtle back spounge.

    6 Purchase 'pole sander', a 4 foot device with a swivel head useing a partial piece of sand paper.

    7. Wear a spray painters mask when sanding.

    8. It takes 3 coats to do it right.
     

  3. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    Hi moopups,
    Is a spray painters mask, the cheapo paper kind or something with a canister on the front?
    lacyj
     
  4. For that much sanding, get a "vacuum sander". A little device that attaches to your shop vac with a pail of water to capture the dust and a hose with a sanding pad on the end. Used to be pricey, but just found the small one at Menards for $27. Works great and no anoying masks needed. There is a more deluxe model that includes a sanding pole attachment as well.
     
  5. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    A bit of Dawn dishsoap mixed in helps. A good sized squirt while you mix the mud (I really don't know why but my drywall guy swears by it). If you can find a 2' knife for the finnish coat get one. 6" for the first run 12" for the second and 2' for the third. Get a mixing paddle for a 1/2' drill don't just use it out of the bucket. Also if you can get the +3 in cardboard boxes it will be a buck or two cheaper then just thin it in a bucket. Ask lots of questions.


    mikell
     
  6. simpleman

    simpleman Well-Known Member

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    Hope I was some help.

    Ernest
     
  7. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you have a home depot nearby they rent a combination tool that has the sanding disk on the end of a vacuum hose/shop vac. When you turn on the sander, the vacuum comes on too. It will save a lot of time and with a little practice you can do a better job than by hand.
     
  8. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    If you use water to finish your drywall be prepaired for it to look like it.I have never seen a pro use anything but sandpaper. If your planning painting with semi-gloss you will need a great finished surface.


    mikell
     
  9. BetsyK in Mich

    BetsyK in Mich Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This posting brings to mind a question. I've done a LOT of drywalling in this old house and used a corner tool and three coats of mud. I would like to know why so many of my inside corners have cracked and opened up, some enough to see the web tape. I find myself "redoing" the corners when I paint. Maybe this is why the suggestion to use caulking in the corners. Have used the dust collector and they work great . . . wish I'd bought the thing before skim coating the plaster in the first four rooms.
     
  10. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    We have a makita orbital sander, with a little vacumne bag on it. It plugs up tooooo fast, I was wondering about adding a longer hose to it and putting it out the window or something. I have a large shop vaccumne that can use water, but it wasn't keeping the dust in the vacumne, it was blowing out the exit hole. Thought about putting an extension out the window for that too.
    1) which extension would be better?Would either work?
    My corners are showing hair line cracks too, that's why I was askin' about the paintable caulk.
    2) should I just keep, coating the corners, until the cracks disapear? Will they disapear?
    I've got the corner trowel and alll the other widths of trowels and am using them.There are some pin holes, up to the size of a fat headed pin, nothing as big as a thumb tack.
    3) How small of a blemish, can be overlooked?
    We have a box of sandpaper sponges, we're using, in three grits.
    4) Do you think that I can use the fine grit, wet, for final sanding? Or, would it make it worse, in the long run?
    Thanks,
    lacyj
     
  11. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    I thought I'd bump this, hope you don't mind...
    lacyj
     
  12. Ana Bluebird

    Ana Bluebird Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In our early 50's, my husband and I built our house ourselves. We are not any kind of carpenters, but decided to give it a try because people no smarter than us used to build their own houses all the time, right? We kept to a simple floor plan, asked lots of questions (amazing how helpful people are), and slowly made progress. We had never mudded before, but I'll have to say it looks pretty good. Looks like you've gotten lots of good advice right here, so don't be intimidated. If we can do it, you can do it. Enjoy!
     
  13. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    I'm an old contractor, been there, done that. But I will admit that the schooling I received by some of the best finishers in the business did not enable me to do taping and topping well.

    That said, nobody has clarified for you that there are two kinds of drywall mud. Taping mud is intended to stick the tape to the seams. This product contains glue and the pros often add extra Elmer's (white glue) to the bucket. A stir paddle on a drill motor makes mixing much easier and it is very necessary; available at Home Depot or equal.

    The second type of mud is called Topping mud and is used to finish the wall. No glue in this product. Topping becomes a repeated task of adding mud to the wall, let it dry, sand it , reapply. This is where I fall down...can never get it done to my satisfaction. And worse, if you intend to NOT texture the wall for painting, the finish is MUCH harder because every miserable little imperfection shows up advertising itself to you and everyone who looks.

    As a result of poor talents at taping and topping, I prefer to stick with other materials for walls and ceilings. My own house has 1 X 6 T & G V groove redwood that was stained before installation and all blind nailed. Looks pretty good.

    'nuf said,

    bearkiller
     
  14. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    They make a product called " Durabond" it comes in 25, 45 and 90 minute set times. Use it to pre-fill any cracks over 1/8". As far as corners cracking it's gonna happen sometimes. Just maks sure the space behind the tape is filled. A corner tool is not necessary. Just do 1 side of the corner (pre-mud both sides)then come back 15 minutes later and set the other side. Just remember it's easier to add mud than remove it.


    mikell
     
  15. We sponge our drywall joints and screw holes with a wet sponge. You dont make any dust
     
  16. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    We sponge our drywall joints and screw holes with a wet sponge. You dont make any dust

    That will work and it will look like crap. For a small repair in a closet perhaps.


    mikell
     
  17. Ed K

    Ed K Well-Known Member

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    A few comments some of which might be off point

    1) I agree with Mikell. "Sanding" with a wet sponge will be cleaner but will never look as good as sanded

    2) You said you're not painting much but if you do look into a special drywall primer from Valspar that contains joint compound. My neighbor used it on his new house and with one coat of primer you couldn't see where the mud lines were and where the unmudded spots were.

    3) If you're wallpapering you should probably prime and use a wallpering "size" primer coat. The "size" will allow you to remove the wallpaper later without tearing the sheetrock paper

    4) My Brother-in-law was a painter and always would apply a thin bead of paintable latex caulk to the corners as well as to any lines between painted trim and painted walls. Corner bead was thinned out very thin with a finger. This seems to stop the cracks from showing through the paint

    Best of luck
     
  18. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone,
    We started painting the bed room today. So far so good. The sponge worked real well. We haven't done much in the other rooms yet, as I really want a bedroom and bathroom, first...Like RIGHT NOW...I'll be using some of your other GREAT suggestions, when we start on the rest of the house.
    Thanks again,
    lacyj
     
  19. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    Here's my question. We are hanging the drywall now in our house. Where the sides come together the sheets are tapered, leaving room for tape and mud. What do you do where the ends come together or cut pieces touch, with no tapered edges?
     
  20. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Make the joint wider with a large knife.18"-24" wouldn't hurt. Seems large but your not using that much more mud just feathering it out more to cover and blend in the tape.

    mikell