Rufle Hunting

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by silent_monk, Jan 18, 2005.

  1. silent_monk

    silent_monk New Member

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    I am planning an expedition to interior BC and need to buy a gun. Could anyone suggest an appropriate model, caliber etc? So far people have reccomended 30-30 or .308 Thanks!
     
  2. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    depends mostly upon what you are figuring on hunting.... or protecting... and how much time you can spend learning to use it before you have to shoot at something....... also depends on the terrain..... brush guns are good for short range, while shooting between rigetops requires a long range pea shooter and fine optics.

    William
     

  3. wy0mn

    wy0mn Transplanted RedNeck

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    Since you don't have an appropriate firearm already, is it safe to assume that you know nothing of firearms? If this is the case, please take a class, or have a knowledgeable shooter instruct you.
    I've shot plenty of firearms in many calibers, both imperial & metric. Probably killed around a hundered white-tail deer in my life. While not a professional hunter, guide, nor self proclaimed guru, I'll give you my thoughts.
    Of all the guns I've owned, of all the calibers I've shot, I prefer my stainless Marlin Guide Gun in .45-70. I have never recovered a bullet inside a whitetail, regardless of the angle of the shot. Bloodtrails are entry & exit wounds, when the animal doesn't drop in its tracks.
    The .45-70 is powerful enough for the largest most dangerous game in North America, bears & moose.
    The Marlin is a lever action, so you have fewer small parts to fail at the wrong time. There is also no magazine, or clip, to lose, crush, nor jam up. In the stainless configuration its as weatherproof as anything you'll find that isn't soaked in cosmoline & wrapped in plastic.
    The only downside, if you wanna call it one, is its limited range. About 150m is as far as you want to shoot at game with it. But with my 45 year old hands & eyes, I shoot within my limitations.
    My wife swears by her .30-06, my hunting pardner uses the .300 magnum in standard & short version.
    Whatever you decide to get try to squeeze in some practice before your trip.
    Good luck
     
  4. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    [1] you have to take the firearms course befire you can buy or borrow a rifle
    [2] you have to take the hunter safety course before you can get a hunting
    licence
    [3] you better learn how to shoot first,get a 22 to practice-cheap and no recoil
    [4] either hunt with an experianced hunter who can show you how to field
    dress and care for game, or get some video's on the subject.
    [5 ] up here, you can get a decent 303 for arround $100, and ammunition is
    readily available., and probably more deer, moose and bear have been taken
    in BC with 303's than anything else
     
  5. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    -oh yeah, one more thing....hunt on the high side of the road- you don't even want to look on the downhill side......ever pack moose quarters out?....
     
  6. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) What's a Rufle? Just wondering. :confused:

    LQ
     
  7. aaatraker

    aaatraker Well-Known Member

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    12 ga shotgun w/rifle brl and slugs, pump action, any of the major brands also take extra shot brl., rifled slugs

    30/06 bolt action any major brand 165 gr or 180 gr ammo

    expedition? hunting or exploring? more info on what your planning to do could help narrow the choices
     
  8. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    Not knowing exactly what you will be using it for makes that a difficult question.

    First off like the others have said make sure you get proper training. If you are in the US the NRA would be more than happy get you in touch with a local club or instructor. Weapons are powerful tools that mus be treated with respect. The bullet has no brain and will destroy whatever you instruct it to destroy. Getting a little .22 to get familiar with firearms first if you aren't already would be a wise move. You just can't run out and get a rifle like you would a tent a backpack. It is fairly complex tool that you need to learn to use. In other words it isn't just an item on your packing checklist like socks or underwear.

    I kinda like these hypothetical. If I were planning to go into the wilds of BC I would have to limit my choices of course to comply with Canadian law unfortunately. That being said a weapon in 30/06 would be pretty hard to beat on many points.
    Lots of weapon choices-more on that later
    You can find 30/06 ammunition about anywhere such items are sold and it comes in about every type of bullet choice imaginable everything from frangible and varmint to steel cored stuff that will blow through concrete blocks.
    The same could really be said of .308 too. I have found .308 to be slightly more accurate but either one will be cable of more accuracy than most people are capable of utilizing. Another plus is that they are usually pretty tame as far as recoil goes.

    As for a weapon I would probably go with a bolt action for reliability and being in Canada legal purposes. Bolt action rifles are legal in Canada the last I knew. I wouldn't hesitate to take a Remington 700 in 30/06 or .308. Since this is an expedition I would prefer one of their lighter "Mountain Rifles". The Winchester Model 70 with it's reliable controlled feed and claw extractor would be great too. Make sure it also has rifle sights even though you will probably want a scope. In this case a rugged high quality scope is in order. Something from Leupold would be fine. Nothing fancy or really high powered. Do not get cheap optics. The scope will be very expensive but it is as important as the rifle. Again, don't buy cheap optics especially in this application. I would probably go with a stainless steel rifle with a synthetic stock for maintenance reasons.

    I would also make sure I took along some repair parts such as a firing pin and various parts that may break. Will only cost a few dollars but if you are 100 miles from nowhere and the firing bin breaks you are out of luck Charlie. A laser bore sighter (less than 100 bucks) to help check for proper zero after a bump to he scope of if you drop the rifle and it will save you all sorts of ammo during your sighting in process. You will also need a light packable cleaning kit and some simple gunsmithing tools like screwdrivers to make any repairs. A good comfortable rifle sling is also in order. A good lockable travel case is also a good idea.

    I probably wouldn't buy used. I would get a new rifle and scope and have it mounted by a competent gunsmith. He can also get you spare parts and would know the one you would most likely need. After you get your rifle and scope you need to buy a variety of ammunition for the types of game you would likely be using this for and go to the range. Get the rifle sighted in and find out which loads and brands your rifle prefers. Run several hundred rounds through the rifle before you set out on your expedition. I'd probably take a few hundred rounds with me depending on how long I would be gone but I tend to over prepare for trips.

    Sounds like quite and adventure but please, please, please learn firearms safety and get some qualified instruction. You need to be totally comfortable and proficient with your firearms especially on an expedition in the bush.
     
  9. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    if the hunter is a non resident of BC, they must hunt with a registered guide, so that eliminates a lot of the questions about familiarization with the actual hunting area.However, it still behooves the individual to comply with all the regulations re obtaining a valid hunting licence and firearm-plus learning how to use it for a humane one shot kill[not always possable, but that's the objective]
     
  10. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know about Canada, but around here hunting Rufles goes a lot better if you leave your gun at home and take flowers.
     
  11. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    dunno about that, there is a lot in common- it;s all about knowing your quarry, feeding grounds, and hitting the rut works pretty good too.And, a dab of scent won't be a bad idea either.
     
  12. silent_monk

    silent_monk New Member

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    I certainly do plan to get my FAC and take some gun safety and wilderness safety courses before i head out (it's a year and a half away). Thank you all very much for your advice. Your replies were very informative. Thanks a lot!
     
  13. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    What's a Rufle? Just wondering.



    It's what you hunt when they ain't no snipes around.
     
  14. kppop

    kppop Well-Known Member

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    I don't know where you live but here in Mi you do not have to take a course before you buy a gun. You do have to take the hunters safety course in order to the a hunting license.

    I think it would be smart for a first time gun owner to take a course but it's not required by law.
     
  15. silent_monk

    silent_monk New Member

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    For clarification, I mis-spelled the title of this thread. I do not know what a 'rufle' is. I mean to ask questions about RIFLES, as in guns. So please stop asking what a rufle is.
     
  16. kppop

    kppop Well-Known Member

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    They're just playing with ya..but I will admit the only reason I looked at this thread was to find was a rufle was! :)


    kppop
     
  17. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    Ohhhh, Sorry. :p I know different locals have different sayings for things. Like things going "Pear Shaped" in OZ..... Or Wonky. LOL Thanks! Good luck with your plans.

    LQ
     
  18. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    silent_monk... Please don't take offence to the jibes. I'm sure they were just all in good natured fun. You didn't indicate in your post what kind of game you expected to be hunting during your trip to BC,& the choice of a rifle would depend quite a bit on what game you would be hunting. As someone said, a bolt-action 30/06 or .308 or .303 would handle most anything that you would likely to be hunting. I have to think that this trip is probably a ''dream'' trip, & that you have been thinking about it for a while. I might suggest that you read some hunting & gun magazines, take the hunter safety course, buy an inexpensive .22, & practice,practice,practice with it untill you're confident of your marksmanship. Successful hunting is much more about shot placement than whatever gun you might have. You also didn't mention $money$. How much do you expect to be able to spend on a hunting rifle? That's fairly important. Once you become proficient with the .22 & you choose your centerfire rifle, then you have to practice with it... & it will be a LOT different. Any major calibre rifle will have quite a bit of Recoil. I really have no way of knowing what your experience is with centerfire rifles, but I suspect from your question that it isn't very much. Everyone has to start somewhere, & the FACT is that the recoil from some guns in some calibres can be disconcerting to beginers.You have to find out for yourself what you can comfortably tolerate.I can only say that you will only be able to make your deceision after some experience & research.Good Luck, & be Safe.