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Sitting here typing a noticed this little fellow... :nono:

We have learned here in Panama it's more polite to waggle your finger to say no than to shake your head.

I don't know about you, but I go to great lengths in the US to make sure I don't have someone in my face waggling a finger.

I kind of like this Panamaian gesture and have been practicing quite a bit on my kiddos.
 

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I have often held up one finger at my kids when I scolded them so that, in public, all I had to do was hold up that finger. Gestures can be marvelous discipline tools :)

When I worked in England, I saw people hold up two fingers, pointer and middle, when they got angry. The fingers were curved towards them as if poised to pull a bow back.

Found that, during war times, the French would cut off the right hand of any English archer that they captured. The English would taunt the French by holding up the two fingers to show that they still had them. This became a rude gesture tantamount to the American middle finger in England.

Fun facts to thrill and amaze your friends with..... can you tell that my work attention span is waning today?
 

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Yes it is a clutural thing. In some places you wag your head from side to side and that mean no in others you way wour head from side to side it means yes. It means that people from diferent reagons of the workd have a hard time adjusting from one way to another.
 

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When Finns spean English, it's common they say cusswords since they can't translate well. Going number one or two..that's a fun thing to hear Finns say in English lol.

Also never talk about your third eye either to a Finn..it's about where the sun doesn't shine :D lol

Kat
 

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Is it just me, or does this little guy look like he's waving his middle finger? :nono:
 

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cjb said:
I have often held up one finger at my kids when I scolded them so that, in public, all I had to do was hold up that finger. Gestures can be marvelous discipline tools :)

When I worked in England, I saw people hold up two fingers, pointer and middle, when they got angry. The fingers were curved towards them as if poised to pull a bow back.

Found that, during war times, the French would cut off the right hand of any English archer that they captured. The English would taunt the French by holding up the two fingers to show that they still had them. This became a rude gesture tantamount to the American middle finger in England.

Fun facts to thrill and amaze your friends with..... can you tell that my work attention span is waning today?
This English gesture is called the V sign and is very vulgar- don't make a peace sign and turn it around (backs of fingers facing the audience) or you have really erred there. BTW we were taught (by the British Plate Armour Society) that the Normans just cut off the index and middle finger not the hand...
 

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I used the pointy finger all the time for my children when we were in public! The easy moving, waggling finger :nono: meant 'no' or 'enough'. If I placed it on the corner of my eye, it meant look, on my ear it meant listen, on my temple it meant think, on my heart it meant be nice, if I held it straight up with a quick jerk --it meant I'd had enough and you better stop it right NOW!" Funny thing is, I now see my children using this with the grands...

No one in my family could talk if you were to hold their hands, we use hand gesters all the time.
 

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vickiesmom said:
Fags are cigarettes in England...
Yeah, I worked in a global company for several years and telephoned a counterpart in England. Someone else picked up his phone and I said, "Oh, I'm sorry, I was trying to reach Paul."
"Well, this is his number, all right," came the reply, "only you've just missed him. He stepped outside to have a fag."

Took me a moment for that to sink in.
 

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Down here we tend to talk with our hands just as much with our mouths. Not that you can just look at our hand motions and see what we mean, but they need to be moving in order to talk(even on the phone).

Thats why we don't do well in large crowds. I remember when I was young we were in the airport in New Orleans and some out of towners hadn't learned this I guess. After my mom hit the woman who insisted on standing right by her side 4 times she moved.

I am quick to put up my middle finger when driving. I've been known to mean to wave at someone I knew and end up flicking them off. It doesn't mean much to me(or most anyone here), just used to let you know that what you did was wrong. Now when the lips are moving and the finger in the air thats bad.
 

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You also don't say "spunky" or "fanny" in England and, if your name is Willie or Randy... you'll suffer.
 
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cjb said:
I have often held up one finger at my kids when I scolded them so that, in public, all I had to do was hold up that finger. Gestures can be marvelous discipline tools :)

When I worked in England, I saw people hold up two fingers, pointer and middle, when they got angry. The fingers were curved towards them as if poised to pull a bow back.

Found that, during war times, the French would cut off the right hand of any English archer that they captured. The English would taunt the French by holding up the two fingers to show that they still had them. This became a rude gesture tantamount to the American middle finger in England.

Fun facts to thrill and amaze your friends with..... can you tell that my work attention span is waning today?
this whole post is pretty cool,lol.
 

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Have a friend who tells a funny story about eating dinner at a very nice restaraunt with English family who he had gone to visit. When he was done, he announced, "I'm stuffed!" cheerfully.

... 'get stuffed' has a very different meaning in England, apparently.

I also have a friend from the Netherlands who was out here visiting a mutual friend. He speaks very grammatically good English, but doesn't have a complete grasp of American innuendo. I was surprised by the number of times he accidentally said something that would be very off color if an American said it. We have a rather large amount of innuendo in our language that we don't even think of and we automatically avoid saying things certain ways without any conscious thought ...
 

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I watch Coronation Street from England here in Detroit...which is the world's greatest soap opera!!!!! I have picked up so many Englandisms...as I call them...I call my kids 'pikers' when they don't want to pay for something...I told a person in a store to 'sling yer hook'...which means to get lost...and my favorite...'I could be an umbrella, I'm so over you"...I want to date somebody just so I can use that..LOL!
 
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