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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in building a small cabin (12' x 12' is plenty big) for a hunting cabin on some property we own. Something our grandkids could point to and say - 'Yep, grandpa was the architect and builder of this place.' and say it with pride. I've looked at many alternative architecture plans (the sandbag palace looked most promising with our environment).

Rubble filled wall construction is where you place two board side by side, which will determine the thickness of your wall. You tie these boards together with wire, fill the cavity with stones, then fill the space with concrete. You install another board on top of this, lining up the boards with the bottom board, and wait for the bottom course to dry. When it does, repeat the steps.

Has anybody ever tried making a building with this method? Do you recommend it? Or does it require too much stone to do this right. I've seen some outstanding projects made, one made with riverstone in California in particular, wow. :eek: Fantastic.

I've got plenty of good detailing this - what did the books forget to add.

Thanks in advance for any help / advice given.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the suggestions folks. Yes, slipform is the descriptive term for this - thanks Unreg Dave. I have Ken Kerns book - it is an excellent resource.

I was hoping to make them cavity walls of at least 8" each with a cavity of at least three inches for a thermal break. The only reasons I am considering stone is its beauty, permanance (sp?)and strength. I was hoping to cover the bottom five feet of wall by either berming them, or digging out a hill allowing the soil to help insulate. The strength required to deal with wet earth is the reason I am considering stone. With only a minimum of exposed wall, superinsulating an earth roof, and installing wind scoops for air, I might have a shot for what I'm trying to accomplish.

My big problem, I think, will be humidity control - our climate is H U M I D and will be a big factor in maintaince, I think. Siting the building to be set on a north facing hill should also help with fighting heat gain.

Still grasping at straws for a solution - building a small with no utilities in a hot, humid environment. Mike Oehler's book The $50 and Up Underground Home looks very promising.

Thanks for the help.
 
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