Rotating Potatoes

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by sylvar, Jun 30, 2006.

  1. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    Hello all!
    Every year I try to plant something I have never planted before. I have had a garden since I was a little boy, but I had never grown potatos till this year. They seem to be doing great, but I am thinking ahead to next year.

    What do you rotate your potatoes with? My soil is naturally a 7.0ph. I added a lot of sulfer to the potato patch to try to drop the PH. What other vegatables do well in acidic soil?

    Thanks!

    Shane
     
  2. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The simplest rotation I ever heard was to rotate by part of the plant used: leaves, roots, fruits. Never follow the same types, and that's it.

    You might want to test your soil for pH at the end of the season, as it takes a tremendous amount of material to affect it. You may not have to worry about acidity at all.
     

  3. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    You also don't want to plant similar types of plants behind each other. For instance, tomatoes and potatoes are both members of the night shade family, and are both heavy feeders, so you would not want to plant tomatoes behind your potatoes.
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Shane, the best thing that you can do is to continue to change that one area of your garden. Then, make it your permanent potato patch. That was how it was done for centuries. I've got a separate plot which has been growing only potatoes since 1990. My soil was only slightly acidic but the potato patch is now close to 6.0. That's to help prevent common scab that exists in this area. By adding shredded pine boughs and needles plus shredded maple and oak leaves compost, all tubers are scab-free and production gets better and better each year,

    Martin
     
  5. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Martin!
    I was hoping that I could do that.

    Shane